A Glory on Venus

Venus_glory_largeA rainbow-like feature known as a “glory” has been seen by ESA’s Venus Express orbiter in the atmosphere of our nearest planetary neighbor—the first time one has been fully imaged on another planet.

Rainbows and glories occur when sunlight shines on cloud droplets—water particles here on Earth. While rainbows arch across the sky, glories are typically much smaller and are made up of a series of coloured concentric rings centred on a bright core. Glories are only seen when the observer is situated directly between the Sun and the cloud particles that are reflecting sunlight. On Earth, they are often seen from aircraft, surrounding the shadow of the aircraft on the clouds below.

In order for a glory to occur, the particles must be spherical and the same size. The atmosphere of Venus is thought to contain droplets rich in sulphuric acid.

Mission scientists at ESA hoped to find a glory in the atmosphere of Venus by imaging the clouds with the Sun directly behind the Venus Express spacecraft. They were successful. The glory in this image was seen at the Venus cloud tops, 70 km above the planet’s surface. It is 1,200 km wide as seen from the spacecraft, 6,000 km away.

Image Credit: ESA

A Glory on Venus

Venus_glory_largeA rainbow-like feature known as a “glory” has been seen by ESA’s Venus Express orbiter in the atmosphere of our nearest planetary neighbor—the first time one has been fully imaged on another planet.

Rainbows and glories occur when sunlight shines on cloud droplets—water particles here on Earth. While rainbows arch across the sky, glories are typically much smaller and are made up of a series of coloured concentric rings centred on a bright core. Glories are only seen when the observer is situated directly between the Sun and the cloud particles that are reflecting sunlight. On Earth, they are often seen from aircraft, surrounding the shadow of the aircraft on the clouds below.

In order for a glory to occur, the particles must be spherical and the same size. The atmosphere of Venus is thought to contain droplets rich in sulphuric acid.

Mission scientists at ESA hoped to find a glory in the atmosphere of Venus by imaging the clouds with the Sun directly behind the Venus Express spacecraft. They were successful. The glory in this image was seen at the Venus cloud tops, 70 km above the planet’s surface. It is 1,200 km wide as seen from the spacecraft, 6,000 km away.

Image Credit: ESA

Venus in UV

Global_dynamics_of_Venus_northern_hemisphere_node_full_imageThis false-colour movie was put together using ultraviolet images taken by the Venus Monitoring Camera on board ESA’s Venus Express spacecraft on 22 May, 2006. The spacecraft was flying over the northern hemisphere at distances ranging between about 39,100 and 22,600 km from the surface.

Video Credit: ESA

A Day in the Life of Venus Express

These false color images of the cloud tops of Venus taken during nearly a full orbit of ESA’s Venus Express around the planet. The inset shows the corresponding position and relative speed of Venus Express as it approaches from its furthest distance of 66,000 km above the south pole, swooping down to 250 km above the north pole.

Video Credit: ESA