Staring at the Sun

On 29 April, 2015, three satellite observatories—NuSTAR, Hinode, and Solar Dynamics Observatory—all stared at our Sun. This image merges data from  Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array, or NuSTAR (high-energy x-rays shown in blue), Japan’s Hinode spacecraft (low-energy x-rays in green), and SDO (extreme UV in yellow and red). The blue-white NuSTAR data pinpoint the most energetic areas.

Image Credit: NASA  /JPL-Caltech / GSFC / JAXA

We Can’t See This *On* The Earth

aurora uvThis is the first image of Saturn’s aurora that was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 1997 when Saturn was 1.3 billion km from Earth. Saturn’s auroral displays are caused by an energetic wind of charged particles from the Sun that sweeps over the planet. Unlike the Earth’s, Saturn’s aurora is only seen in ultraviolet light. Because the UV doesn’t penetrate our atmosphere, Saturn’s aurora can only be observed from space.

Image Credit: NASA

NASA/ESA Release the First Images from the Solar Orbiter

This animation shows a series of views of the Sun captured by Extreme Ultraviolet Imager on the Solar Orbiter on 30 May. They show the Sun’s appearance at a wavelength of 17 nanometers in the extreme ultraviolet region of the electromagnetic spectrum. Images at this wavelength allow examination of the Sun’s upper atmosphere and the corona, regions with temperatures of more than 1,000,000 C.
Image Credits: ESA, NASA, CSL, IAS, MPS, PMOD/WRC, ROB, UCL/MSSL