Some Thoughts

The Gentle Reader may remember that the Washington (Democracy Dies in Derpness™) Post published a false story saying the Eire, Pennsylvania, postal worker who had offered testimony about backdated postmarks on mail-in ballots had “recanted.” I found it interesting that when Project Veritas published the raw audio tapes of the interrogation of the postal worker, we found out the investigator conducting the interrogation was named Strasser. Neither Captain Renault nor any of the usual suspects were available for comment.

Following along a mid-20th-century line of thought, Don Surber has a post up suggesting that we Don’t blow off AOC. He writes,

Let’s not blow off Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. You may not see her appeal, but millions of Democrats do. She is the soul of the soulless Democrat Party.

AOC’s danger is that unlike Obama, Manchin, and the rest of the 50 and older crowd in the Democrat Party, she does not seek power. She seeks a revolution.

I think I understand her appeal to the younger cohort of socialists. It’s this: When we had Obama as President, we were fundamentally changing America. But then the old men and women in our party let Orange Man Bad win. We were stabbed in the back.

You may not want to buy what she’s selling, but there’s historical precedent for that sales pitch working, particularly when tied to appeals to racial superiority. That’s where the other members of the Squad come in. Surber’s post notes that Politico has quoted Rashida Tlaib as saying,

“We are not interested in unity that asks people to sacrifice their freedom and their rights any longer. And if we truly want to unify our country, we have to really respect every single voice. We say that so willingly when we talk about Trump supporters, but we don’t say that willingly for my black and brown neighbors and from LGBTQ neighbors or marginalized people.”

Surber adds:

Take her seriously.

She is playing with racist fire. Her message is clear. Black and brown people are superior to white people.

This is not the Democrat Party’s worst nightmare. Democrats believe this rhetoric and the ideas it stands for will propel them to power.

No, this is America’s worst nightmare.

I’ll be 73 on New Year’s Eve. Over my life, I’ve watched most of America move away from the ugliness of racial superiority. Most but not all. It seems that a portion of the Democrats have held on to it, merely flipping on which side they imagine to be superior.

We really don’t want a redo of the 1920’s and ’30s.

The Old Normal

Several conservative commentators have taken the position that Donald Trump’s tweets about The Squad last weekend were a PR blunder. One pundit described it as an “own goal.” I disagree. While I might not have phrased those tweets exactly as the President did, I believe that his main point—Why don’t you go straighten out one of those troubled foreign countries you admire (eg., Somalia, “Palestine”) to provide a worked example of how you think we should change America?—is a valid put-up-or-shut-up challenge to those congressional novices.

I also think that he’s been smart in refusing to back down, and there’s a post over at Bookworm Room that provides a partial explanation of my view. Over the past decade, the Left has successfully narrowed the range of “respectable” public opinion (called the Overton Window). Trump is forcing the allowable range of our public conversation back to realm of opinions held by most sentient adult Americans, including many, if not most, Leftists.

Think of ideas that were normal just a decade ago: using pronouns consistent with biological sex, worrying about Muslim-inspired terrorism, admiring the Founding Fathers, believing that a traditional male-female marriage is optimal for raising children, mentioning the Judeo-Christian God in public, questioning anthropogenic climate change, or being anything but mindlessly positive about a member of a “Progressive protected victim class.” Nowadays, thanks to relentless media, entertainment, political, and educational pressure, voicing those ideas creates the risk that the speaker will be shouted down, humiliated, fired, or even physically attacked.

Read the whole thing.

Donald Trump is sometimes inarticulate or coarse. But just as the economy has improved by the changes the President has championed to the New Normal economy, our public discourse will likely benefit in the long run as we allow the values that made America great to compete with the New Normal in the marketplace of ideas.