Saturn and Some of Its Moons


The animation shows the orbits of Saturn’s visible moons Tethys, Janus, Mimas, Enceladus, and Rhea over the observing run in June, 2019 (with elapsed time bar).

Video Credits: NASA / ESA / A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center) / M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley) / J. DePasquale (STScI)

Odysseus


Don’t worry. It’s a moon, not a space station.

It’s Saturn’s icy moon Tethys. The enormous impact created the crater is named Odysseus. The crater is about 450 km across surrounded by a ring of steep cliffs and and has a rang of mountains rising from its center. Tethys is only a bit over 1070 km in diameter.

This picture is a composite assembled from images taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft in 2015 when is was roughly 44,500 km from the moon.

Image Credit: NASA

Saturn, Rings, and Moons


Cassini snapped this picture with its narrow-angle camera. It shows Saturn and its rings seen here nearly edge on. The image also shows the moons Mimas (above the rings), tiny Janus (apparently almost in the rings), and Tethys (below the rings). “Above” and “below” the rings is a matter of perspective. All three moons and the rings orbit Saturn in roughly the same plane.

Image Credit: NASA

Saturn and Tethys


Saturn & TethysAt 116,500 km across, Saturn is roughly 10 times the diameter of Earth. The planet is much larger in relation to its moons than our Earth to its Moon. Saturn’s moon Tethys (which is a bit more than 1,000 km in diameter and could be counted as a dwarf planet it orbited the Sun by itself) can be seen as a speck in the lower right of the picture.

Image Credit: NASA

Bullseye


Enceladus_Tethys_bullseyEnceladus and Tethys line up almost perfectly in this shot from the Cassini spacecraft. Since the two moons are not only aligned, but also at nearly the same distance from Cassini, their apparent sizes are a reasonable approximation of their relative sizes. Enceladus is 504 km across, and Tethys is 1,062 km in diameter.

Image Credit: NASA