Panning Across the Starburst Arc


This Hubble image shows a massive galaxy about 4.6 billion light years away. Around that galaxy’s border are four bright arcs. They are images the same distant galaxy nicknamed the Sunburst Arc. The Sunburst Arc galaxy is almost 11 billion light-years away. Its light is lensed into multiple images by gravitational lensing of the nearer galaxy. The Sunburst Arc is one of the brightest lensed galaxies known, and its image is visible at least 12 times within the four arcs.

Video Credit: ESA / NASA / Rivera-Thorsen et al.

A Starbursting Galaxy


This is the dwarf galaxy known as NGC 1140. It lies 60 million light-years away in the constellation of Eridanus. It has an irregular form, much like the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small galaxy that orbits the Milky Way. This small galaxy is undergoing a starburst. Despite being only about one-tenth the size of the Milky Way, it is creating stars at about the same rate—the equivalent of one star the size of our sun being created per year. The galaxy is full of bright, blue-white, young stars.

Galaxies like NGC 1140 are of particular interest to astronomers because their composition makes them similar to the intensely star-forming galaxies in the early Universe, and those early Universe galaxies were the building blocks of present-day large galaxies like our Milky Way. Because they are so far away, the early Universe galaxies are harder to study, so these closer starbursting galaxies are a good substitute for studyingt galaxy evolution.

Its vigorous star formation eventually will have a very destructive effect on this small dwarf galaxy. When the larger stars in the galaxy die and explode as supernovae, the gas blown into space may escape the gravitational pull of the galaxy. The ejection of gas from the galaxy throws away one of the building blocks for future star formation. Thus, NGC 1140’s starburst cannot last for long.

Image Credit: ESA

IC 10


This is an irregular galaxy named IC 10, a member of the Local Group — the nearby group of over 50 galaxies that includes the Milky Way. IC 10 is the closest-known starburst galaxy to us. It is the site of rapid star formation fueled by ample supplies of cool hydrogen gas. This gas condenses into vast molecular clouds which further contract into dense knots where pressures and temperatures reach a point sufficient to ignite nuclear fusion, and new stars are born.

Image Credit: ESA / NASA

A Dwarf Starburst Galaxy


NGC 1705 is a oddball irregular dwarf galaxy undergoing a starburst. It’s about 17 million light-years from the Earth in the constellation Pictor. Dwarf galaxies were probably the first systems to collapse and start forming stars in the early universe. They represent the building blocks from which more massive objects (such as spiral and elliptical galaxies) were formed through mergers. The remaining dwarf galaxies are thought to be the leftovers of the galaxy-formation process.

Image Credit: NASA

M94


Starburst galaxy Messier 94This is the galaxy Messier 94 which lies about 16 million light-years away. Within the bright ring around Messier 94, new stars are forming at a high rate, so many that that feature is called a starburst ring. This peculiarly-shaped star-forming region is likely the result of a pressure wave going outwards from the galactic center, compressing the gas and dust in the outer region. The compression causes the gas to collapse into denser clouds, and gravity pulls the gas and dust together inside the clouds until temperature and pressure are high enough for stars to be born.

Image Credit: ESA / NASA