A Speck in the Corner


Saturn & TethysAt 116,500 km across, Saturn is roughly 10 times the diameter of Earth. The planet is much larger in relation to its moons than our Earth to its Moon. Saturn’s moon Tethys (which is a bit more than 1,000 km in diameter and could be counted as a dwarf planet it orbited the Sun by itself) can be seen as a speck in the lower right of the picture.

Image Credit: NASA

The Star of Bethlehem


Roughly every twenty years, the paths of Jupiter and Saturn line up in the night sky, and the planets appear close together, an event called the Grand Conjunction. One occurs this evening. Look toward the southwest just after sunset, and if the sky is clear, you’ll see Jupiter and Saturn almost perfectly aligned, only about 0.1 degree apart. They haven’t come this close since 1623, but they were nearly aligned with the Sun and hard to see that year. The last time they were this close and relatively far from the Sun was in 1226.Grand Conjunctions occurred three times in 7 BC and again as a triple conjunction with Jupiter, Saturn, and Mars in early 6 BC. You can find more about those conjunctions and the Star of Bethlehem here.

A Lunar Lineup


Enceladus_Tethys_bullseyEnceladus and Tethys line up almost perfectly in this shot from the Cassini spacecraft. Since the two moons are not only aligned, but also at nearly the same distance from Cassini, their apparent sizes are a reasonable approximation of their relative sizes. Enceladus is 504 km across, and Tethys is 1,062 km in diameter.

Image Credit: NASA

A Pair of Moons


Dione_EnceladusAlthough Saturn’s moons Dione (in the foreground) and Enceladus are made of more or less the same stuff, Enceladus has a considerably higher reflectivity than Dione. Therefore, it appears brighter against the blackness of space.

Enceladus has a constant rain of ice grains from its south polar jets which cover its surface with a bright snow. Dione’s older, weathered surface has slowly gathered dust and radiation damage, darkening through a process known as “space weathering.”

Image Credit: NASA

Look Closely, You’re In This Picture


Click the image to embiggen it. No, really, do it, and click on the new image a second time. You can use your BACK button to return.saturn_full_annotated

On 19 July, 2013,  the Cassini spacecraft slipped into Saturn’s shadow and turned to image the planet, seven of its moons, its inner rings,and—in the background—Earth.

With the Sun eclipsed by Saturn, Cassini‘s cameras were able to take advantage of this unusual viewing geometry. A panoramic mosaic of the Saturn system was taken that allows details in the rings backlit by the sun to be seen. This event was the third time Earth was imaged from the outer solar system.

Cassini captured 323 images in just over four hours. This final mosaic uses 141 of them. Images taken using the red, green, and blue spectral filters of the wide-angle camera were combined to create this natural-color view. This image spans a bit more than 650,000 km.

Make sure you embiggen it and scroll around.

Image Credit: NASA

Titan and Tethys


converted PNM fileSaturn’s moon Tethys with its prominent Odysseus Crater seems to lurk behind Saturn’s largest moon Titan in this image taken by the Cassini spacecraft in 2014.

The Titans were the pre-Olympian gods in Greek mythology. Tethys was a Titan daughter of Uranus and Gaia, sister and wife of the Titan Oceanus, and mother of the river gods and the Oceanids

Image Credit: NASA

Crescent Saturn


On Earth we never see Saturn in a crescent phase because it is farther from the Sun than Earth, and it is always fully illuminated from our point of view. The Cassini spacecraft’s orbits around the planet allowed its cameras to see Saturn in ways not possible from Earth.

Image Credit: NASA

Saturn and Some of Its Moons


The animation shows the orbits of Saturn’s visible moons Tethys, Janus, Mimas, Enceladus, and Rhea over the observing run in June, 2019 (with elapsed time bar).

Video Credits: NASA / ESA / A. Simon (Goddard Space Flight Center) / M.H. Wong (University of California, Berkeley) / J. DePasquale (STScI)

Herschel Crater


Herschel Crater is 130 km wide, covering a large portion of Saturn’s moon Mimas. The moon itself is only 396 km wide.

The dayside terrain seen here is on leading hemisphere of Mimas. North on Mimas is up and rotated 1 degree to the left in this image which was taken in visible light by the Cassini spacecraft in 2010.

Image Credit: NASA

Moar Science from Cassini


As the Cassini spacecraft was running out of fuel for the thrusters used to maintain control of its attitude so that it could point it instruments at the desired targets and its antenna toward Earth so send back data, it was placed in a series of Grand Finale orbits that took it between Saturn’s rings and the planet’s upper atmosphere. Eventually, an orbit was low enough that the spacecraft burned up in the upper atmosphere. It will take years to go through all the data, but papers are beginning to be published with findings from the Grand Finale. Interesting findings include an electric current that flows between the rings and the upper atmosphere and organic compounds falling as “rain” from the rings. There’s more interesting stuff here. Go take a look.

Image Credit: NASA