Tuning in on Saturn


New research from the up-close Grand Finale orbits of the Cassini mission shows a surprisingly powerful interaction of plasma waves moving from Saturn to its moon Enceladus. The data used to make this video was captured by the Radio Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) instrument two weeks before Cassini was deliberately plunged into the atmosphere of Saturn.

Video Credit: NASA / JPL-Caltech / University of Iowa

Odysseus


Don’t worry. It’s a moon, not a space station.

It’s Saturn’s icy moon Tethys. The enormous impact created the crater is named Odysseus. The crater is about 450 km across surrounded by a ring of steep cliffs and and has a rang of mountains rising from its center. Tethys is only a bit over 1070 km in diameter.

This picture is a composite assembled from images taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft in 2015 when is was roughly 44,500 km from the moon.

Image Credit: NASA

Saturn, Rings, and Moons


Cassini snapped this picture with its narrow-angle camera. It shows Saturn and its rings seen here nearly edge on. The image also shows the moons Mimas (above the rings), tiny Janus (apparently almost in the rings), and Tethys (below the rings). “Above” and “below” the rings is a matter of perspective. All three moons and the rings orbit Saturn in roughly the same plane.

Image Credit: NASA

Enceladus, Pandora, and Rings (Oh, My!)


Saturn’s moon Enceladus is backlit by the Sun in this Cassini spacecraft image from 2009. The dramatic lighting shows of the plumes that continuously spew into space from the south pole of 500 km diameter moon. The icy plumes are likely fed by an ocean beneath the ice shell of Enceladus. They supply material directly to Saturn’s outer, tenuous E ring and make the surface of Enceladus as reflective as snow. Behind Enceladus, Saturn’s rings scatter sunlight toward Cassini. Beyond the rings, the night side of the 80 km diameter moon Pandora is faintly lit by light reflecting off of Saturn.

Image Credit: NASA