NGC 6153


A nitrogen-rich nebula This is NGC 6153. The faint blue haze is what remains of a star like the sun after it had depleted most of its fuel. When that happened, the outer layers of the star were ejected and then ionized by the ultraviolet light from hot core of the star, forming the nebula.

NGC 6153 is a planetary nebula which contains large amounts of neon, argon, oxygen, carbon and chlorine—up to three times more than can be found in our solar system. It contains five times more nitrogen than our sun! It could be that the star developed higher levels of these elements as it grew and evolved, but it is more likely that the star originally formed from a cloud of material that already contained an abundance of those elements.

Image Credit: ESA / NASA

NCG 6153


A nitrogen-rich nebula This is NGC 6153. The faint blue haze is what remains of a star like the sun after it had depleted most of its fuel. When that happened, the outer layers of the star were ejected and then ionized by the ultraviolet light from hot core of the star, forming the nebula.

NGC 6153 is a planetary nebula which contains large amounts of neon, argon, oxygen, carbon and chlorine—up to three times more than can be found in our solar system. It contains five times more nitrogen than our sun! It could be that the star developed higher levels of these elements as it grew and evolved, but it is more likely that the star originally formed from a cloud of material that already contained an abundance of those elements.

Image Credit: ESA / NASA

NGC 7027


NGC 7027 is a very young (only about 600 years old) and dense planetary nebula located roughly 3,000 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus. NGC 7027 is one of the visually brightest planetary nebulae. In a 6-in telescope at 50x it appears as a relatively bright bluish star. At magnifications around 180x it has a vaguely ursine shape which has led to the nickname “Gummy Bear Nebula”. It is best viewed with the highest magnification possible. This image was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Image Credit: NASA

The Little Ghost Nebula


NGC 6369 is a planetary nebula also known as the Little Ghost Nebula. Planetary nebulae aren’t related to planets. They’re gaseous shrouds created at the end of a Sun-like star’s life as the dying star’s outer layers expand while its core shrinks to become a white dwarf. The white dwarf radiates strongly at ultraviolet wavelengths, powering the expanding nebula’s glow. NGC 636’s main round structure is about a light-year across, and the glow from its ionized oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen atoms are colored blue, green, and red respectively. The Little Ghost Nebula offers a glimpse of the likely fate of our Sun which could produce its own planetary nebula about 5 billion years from now.

Image Credit: NASA

IC 1295


The glowing green planetary nebula IC 1295 surrounds a dim and dying star. It is located about 3300 light-years away in the constellation of Scutum (The Shield). The white dwarf star is softly shedding its outer layers, like an unfolding flower in space. It will continue this process for a few tens of thousands of years.

Image Credit: ESO