Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin has failed at a great many more things than his attempts to use lawfare to silence people who have written truthful things about him and his activities. He’s tried to make a go of using music as a tool for left-wing activism, and failed as The Dread Deadbeat Performer/Producer/Promoter/Protester Kimberlin as well. Consider this post from seven years ago today titled Justice Through Music Project, Soooper Promoters.

* * * * *

Gentle Reader, I’ll bet you didn’t know how critical having their music on the Justice Through Music Project has been for so many recording artists. What follows is from a press release dated in 2006. The subject of Craig Gillette’s PR release was the work JTMP was doing to promote a Neal Young album. I really liked this bit:

Justice Through Music has been a pioneer for the past five years in using famous bands and artists to promote civil rights. More and more artists are coming to JTM to get out their political message, including recently, Pink, Eminem, the Dixie Chicks, and many others.

JTMP’s incorporation papers show a start up date in 2003 but I suppose that Brett Kimberlin could have be operating the organization as an unincorporated entity for a couple of years. He was released from prison in 2001.

And I’m gratified to know how JTMP was so helpful to struggling acts like Pink, Eminem, the Dixie Chicks. Who knows? Maybe one day Brett Kimberlin will put that same powerful soooper promotion behind his own musical career.

* * * * *

It’s been over a year and a half since there has been any new material posted to the Justice Through Music Project website. Indeed, when Kimberlin put up a post promotion the most recent music project he’d been associated with, he published it on his Ukrainian site empr dot media.

Perhaps Justice Through Music and the band Op-Critical are now abandoned failures.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


A commenter to yesterday’s TKPOTD asks if Lobotomy, the song in the music video referenced in the post, is a recycled Op-Critical tune. I believe so. Here’s a song list from op-critical dot com, the website for what used to be the house band for The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s not-for-profit Justice Through Music Project. Lobotomy is one of the titles listed.That website doesn’t appear to have had any maintenance for several years. All of the links are broken.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


One of the most persistent wastes of Internet bandwidth inflicted on the Universe by Team Kimberlin is the op-critical dot com website that allegedly promotes The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s band Op-Critical. Seven years ago, I posted #BrettKimberlin and Op-Critical which noted … oh, I’ll let it speak for itself.

* * * * *

Tuesday night, I posted a review of the CD released by Brett Kimberlin’s previous band Epoxy. His most recent music group is called Op-Critical. The band has a website, a rather stale one that doesn’t appear to have been updated for several years.

While nosing about the site, I found these lyrics as part of a song called Fork

I am losing all control and I just don’t know what to do …

Yep, we are controlling transmission. If we wish to make it louder, we will bring up the volume. If we wish to make it softer, we will tune it to a whisper. We will control the horizontal. We will control the vertical. We can roll the image, make it flutter. We can change the focus to a soft blur or sharpen it to crystal clarity.

You have gone past the outer limit of what you might have been able to control, but the truth will bring clarity. But clarity may not be your friend.

* * * * *

Yep. The result of The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberli’s lawfare campaign of brass knuckles reputation management was that he lost control of his public persona.

Oh, and as for the op-critical dot com website, it doesn’t seem to have been updated since my post was published in 2012. Here’s a snapshot of it from yesterday evening.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


This appeared in my Twitter Notifications yesterday—I went over to MySpace (yes, it’s still on the web) and checked out the Op-Critical (Brett’s most recent band) songs posted there. While I was able to see the web pages for them, I couldn’t get any of them to play. All were posted during the 2003 to 2012 period supposed to be affected.

BTW, the times played listed for every one other of the songs I checked were all the same. Karma seems to be catching up with The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Lying liars gotta lie, and that explains the bulk of the nonsense that The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin has put out in support of his lawfare. The TDPOTD from four years ago today cataloged this set of lies.

* * * * *

Here’s an interesting claim from one of Exhibit 7 of The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin’s omnibus opposition to the motions to dismiss his Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness. ECF 231 EX7-9The SAC (that’s the second amended complaint) alleges that the mythical RICO enterprise began picking on Brett in August, 2010, although it doesn’t mention any specific acts occurring until October. So what sort of “social causes” was The Dread Performer Kimberlin “highlighting” before August, 2010? Well, in March of that year he was promoting teenage love with werewolves.Op-Crit Tweets

As for TDPK’s claim that he was unable to produce songs and videos after August, 2010, Freakin Frackin was posted to YouTube on 12 January, 2011; Occupy Music Video: Anonymous was posted to YouTube on 17 June, 2011; Coal Miner’s Family was posted to YoutTube on 5 December, 2012; and that’s not a complete list of TDPK’s work published online since 2010.

The most amazing things about Brett’s lying is how clumsy he is with it. You’d think that after all those years of practice, … oh, never mind.

* * * * *

The Twilight Angel video is still up on YouTube. I don’t recommend listening to it unless you have a large quantity of industrial-strength weapons-grade ear bleach available.

The Gentle Reader who is familiar with The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s background may draw his own conclusions about why Op-Critical might put out a music video related to a movie targeted at underage girls.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


As part of a continuing search to find a relevant cause that would motivate donors, Justice Through Music Project got involved with the anti-fracking movement. the TKPOTD from five years ago today dealt with part of that effort.

* * * * *

Justice Through Music Project has posted another music video on YouTube. It’s a sorta/kinda cover of John Prine’s Paradise. It’s an anti-natural-resource-extraction propaganda piece aimed at the Keystone XL pipeline. In fact, the band calls themselves the Keystone Pipeline Kops instead of Op-Critical.

Now, if I were Brett Kimberlin, I would avoid having anything to do with any song from John Prine’s first album lest I remind listeners of other songs from that album that might have unfortunate references to drug dealing, porn, etc.

Sam Stone: “There’s a hole in daddy’s arm where all the money goes.”

Your Flag Decal Won’t Get You Into Heaven Anymore: “While digesting Reader’s Digest in the back of a dirty book store …”

Illegal Smile: “Won’t you please tell the man I didn’t kill anyone …”

Just sayin’ …

* * * * *

The failure of The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s music career sounds like a real Dear Abby.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


One of the claims that The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin has made in his LOLsuits is that all of us bloggers writing truthful things about him have hurt his ability to write and produce his songs and music videos. As this post from five years ago demonstrates, some folks might view a reduction in The Dread Deadbeat Performers output to be a good thing.

* * * * *

Brett Kimberlin fancies himself a great musician. (H/T, Kimberlin Unmaksked)

The term “delusions of adequacy” comes to mind.

UPDATE—Here’s a statement made by a Justice Through Music Project spokesman (not Brett Kimberlin) about the time this video was released:

We want videos that have staying power, that make a cultural statement, and that have an emotional component to them so that they will influence youth. Politicians spend hundreds of millions if not billions of dollars on ads to influence middle class America, and they basically ignore young people totally; and we feel like the music videos are like the cultural statements or the ads for young people, so we hope to get them involved and influence them to make the right decision in November.

Uh, huh.

* * * * *

Kimberlin and Op-Critical really ought to do a cover of I Fought the Law (And the Law Won).

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Here’s an interesting claim from one of Exhibit 7 of The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin’s omnibus opposition to the motions to dismiss his Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness. ECF 231 EX7-9The SAC (that’s the second amended complaint) alleges that the mythical RICO enterprise began picking on Brett in August, 2010, although it doesn’t mention any specific acts occurring until October. So what sort of “social causes” was The Dread Performer Kimberlin “highlighting” before August, 2010? Well, in March of that year he was promoting teenage love with werewolves.Op-Crit Tweets

As for TDPK’s claim that he was unable to produce songs and videos after August, 2010, Freakin Frackin was posted to YouTube on 12 January, 2011; Occupy Music Video: Anonymous was posted to YouTube on 17 June, 2011; Coal Miner’s Family was posted to YoutTube on 5 December, 2012; and that’s not a complete list of TDPK’s work published online since 2010.

The most amazing things about Brett’s lying is how clumsy he is with it. You’d think that after all those years of practice, … oh, never mind.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Gentle Reader, do you ever wonder what the Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin does when he isn’t involved in vexatious lawsuit? He’s got himself a rock-and-roll band called Op-Critical. One of the sca … uh … promotions he’s attempted for the band was trying to get a performance by Op-Critical included in the soundtrack of the Twilight movie Eclipse.Op-Crit TweetsEar-plugsIt shouldn’t surprise anyone familiar with Op-Critical’s body of work to learn that Twilight Angel isn’t on the album. You can listen to The Dread Performer Kimberlin singing Twilight Angel on YouTube, but I don’t recommend doing so. Normally, folks with TDPK’s level of talent are advised not to give up their day jobs, but I’m not sure which causes more harm in Kimberlin’s case.

Taking Sides


I support Israel in its existential battles with enemies dedicated to its destruction. Israel is the only country in the region that is recognizable as a democratic state. It is at war with totalitarian thugs. In such a struggle, I support the democracy against the thugs.

Some folks seem to favor Hamas. Over at the Justice Through Music Project website, they’re headlining a video by Op-Critical called My Eyes.

In 2010, JTMP teamed up with musical-activist band Op-Critical and made the music video “My Eyes” criticizing the use of disproportionate force the Israeli Defense Force always uses against innocent Palestinian civilians. Four years later in 2014, the video still is relevant and needs to be reposted in light of the hundreds of civilians recently being killed by the IDF in the Gaza Strip. … Watch “My Eyes” below, and contact the Israeli embassy in DC and tell them to stop responding with such disproportionate military force in civilian areas.

If you can stomach the singing, you can watch the music video on YouTube.

Hamas has brought about the situation in Gaza. I’ve been amazed by the restraint the Israelis have shown. If I were going to call their embassy, it would be to offer my support.

Weaponized Music


A Canadian industrial rock band called Skinny Puppy has sent an invoice for $660,000 to the U. S. Department of Defense. The band says its music has been played at the Guantanamo Bay Detention Center during the interrogation of detainees, and it is now demanding compensation. The band disapproves of its music being used for “torture.”

Here we have a example of foreigners doing a job that should have been filled by Americans. Why couldn’t Op-Critical’s music have been used?

On Copyright Infringement


Some people seem to think that just because they can write a set of lyrics that fit the melody of an existing piece of music that that are entitled to use someone else’s tune. A parody of the original work might qualify under the Fair Use doctrine, but using the tune for the purpose of parodying something or someone else is a clear violation of the songwriter’s  copyright.

For example, Justice Through Music Project has posted a music video called Happy Springtime (Bush is Over). The music is clearly ripped off from John Lennon and Yoko Ono’s Happy Xmas (War is Over). Now it may be that permission was obtained from Lenono Music and Ono Music, the copyright holders, to use the tune. OTOH, I doubt that those music publishers would have agreed to the copyright notice placed on the video:

Music by
John Lennon
Lyrics by
Brett C. Kimberlin
Copyright 2007
BrettSongs / Innocent Music

The plain reading of that notice is that BrettSongs / Innocent Music claims a copyright on John Lennon’s tune.

Another example, would be some of the songs that have recently appeared on RadioWMS. I doubt that The End Of Music, Mj Twelve Music, or Primary Wave Tunes, the copyright holders of Smells Like Teen Spirit granted permission for use of the tune by Bill Schmalfeldt in Smells Like Groundswell.

Neither of these examples is a parody of the original song involved. When that’s the case, permission is required from copyright holder in order to produce a derivative work. I can’t find the words “Used by permission” on anything associated with those two examples. If the copyright holders were to take notice and legal action, the results could be very, very expensive.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Over the past decade, Brett Kimberlin has raised a couple of million dollars that have flowed through Justice Through Music Project and Velvet Revolution US. What has really been accomplished with those assets? Just how much impact do Brett Kimberlin and his “charities” have in the real world?

As we saw a couple of days ago, the Justice Through Music Project’s online petition drive against the Keystone XL pipeline is a dud. Has any JTMP petition ever had a net positive influence on a decision maker?

He doesn’t seem to have much of an effective web presence either. Here are the Alexa traffic stats for his main websites:dpk_sitestats_201305His site with the most traffic hasn’t been updated since 23 April. Even a bush league site like Hogewash! has significantly more traffic.

Velvet Revolution US has offered huge rewards for information concerning nonexistent crimes allegedly committed by Karl Rove and the NRA. Nothing has ever been paid out. Of course.

Op-Critical, the JTMP house band, has made a bunch of almost-but-not-quite mediocre music videos that lurk on YouTube; the most viewed of them is probably Exile which stars Brett Kimberlin reprising his imagined role as a political prisoner.

When Brett Kimberlin threatened “CPAC maggots” with a massive demonstration at BlogBash this past March, the best he could produce was one guy with a camera.

So how has any of this brought about change in the real world?

This is not to say that Brett Kimberlin and his cronies have had not any effect. Their lawfare and online thuggery have been bothersome to some people and devastating to others. One wonders how much of that two million dollars has gone into funding those activities.

We may begin to find out soon.

Stay tuned.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


cameramanThe Justice Through Music Project house band Op-Critical has been putting out covers of old hits fondly remembered by baby boomers, For What It’s Worth and Paradise most recently. Now that they’ve got footage of a process server and cops that they can use, maybe they will favor us with their version of Indiana Wants Me. One of the members would be a natural for the lead vocal.

frontporch

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Justice Through Music Project has posted another music video on YouTube. It’s a sorta/kinda cover of John Prine’s Paradise. It’s an anti-natural-resource-extraction propaganda piece aimed at the Keystone XL pipeline. In fact, the band calls themselves the Keystone Pipeline Kops instead of Op-Critical.

Now, if I were Brett Kimberlin, I would avoid having anything to do with any song from John Prine’s first album lest I remind listeners of other songs from that album that might have unfortunate references to drug dealing, porn, etc.

Sam Stone: “There’s a hole in daddy’s arm where all the money goes.”

Your Flag Decal Won’t Get You Into Heaven Anymore: “While digesting Reader’s Digest in the back of a dirty book store …”

Illegal Smile: “Won’t you please tell the man I didn’t kill anyone …”

Just sayin’ …

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The most popular of the hundreds of posts about Brett Kimberlin here at Hogewash! was not about his lawfare or his Dread Piracy. It was about his musicianship. It’s time to recycle it again with an update at the end—

bkepoxyBack in 2002, Brett Kimberlin fronted a band named Epoxy and released a CD called Nothing Else. The story he spun promoting the album was that it contained songs that he had written while he was being held as a political prisoner in the federal prison system.

The band consisted of Brett Kimberlin on guitar and vocals, Wade Matthews on Bass, and Robbie White on Drums. The genre of the album is someplace between grunge and punk, neither of which are among my favorite musical forms.

Let me first comment on Mr. Kimberlin’s voice. I had heard his speaking voice in court, and I understand why some people refer to it as whinny. His singing voice reminds me of the silly voice that Weird Al uses on tracks such as Eat It. Mrs. Hoge, who listened through the CD with me, said, “Eddie Haskell.” On most of the tracks his voice was off key, usually flat.

Most of the songs could have been filler tracks on a generic grunge album. Some of the alienation in them seems to be more appropriate for a 17 year old, not someone 30 years older. Mr. Kimberlin was in his late 40s when the recording was made. However, three of the songs stood out. Vicegrip was actually interesting musically. Donuts had clever lyrics. It’s about lousy prison food and would probably get a nod of approval from G. Gordon Liddy.

Then there’s the last cut Keyhole. It was outstandingly bad. Mrs. Hoge and I met while we were in the music business, and during her career as a recording engineer, she recorded more gold and platinum records than I did. Her comment was, “If you’re gonna mike a guitar that close, you should use a better guitar and make sure it’s in tune. And get a better guitar player.”

While he didn’t do especially well with the acoustic guitar on Keyhole, Brett Kimberlin is actually a reasonably good guitarist. He probably couldn’t cut it in Nashville or LA, but could make a living in a minor market (such as Seattle) or playing the Holiday Inn circuit. Indeed, the world would be a better place if he did ignore the usual advice and give up his day job.

Nothing Else by Epoxy (Pollen Records, $16.04 from Amazon) is interesting because of who recorded it, but I can’t honestly recommend it for the musical experience it offers.

UPDATE—Aaron Walker’s review of music videos by Op-Critical, The Dread Pirate Kimberlin’s latest band, can be found here. Another Op-Critical video can be found here. On 5 December, TDPK and Op-Critical released a new music video called “Coal Miner’s Family.” It’s lurking on YouTube, and it deserves a review.

First, a decade of practice has not made any significant improvement in TDPK’s musicianship. The song is supposed to be about a family caught up in the Upper Big Branch mining disaster of 2010. The band seems to be striving to sound like an Appalachian folk group, but it doesn’t seem to have the chops to get there. Instead, it hits that level of mediocrity one hears from urban local bands at East Coast bluegrass festivals.

Second, the choice of subject matter is interesting. Op-Critical is the house band for Justice Through Music Project, an organization with the stated purpose of using “famous musicians and bands to organize, educate and activate young people about the importance of civil rights, human rights and voting.” How a mining disaster relates to that escapes me, but I notice that over the past year, JTMP has promoted anti-natural-resource-development causes such as the Tour de Frack. And now it’s taking on coal mining. And it has a major donor with possible connections to the environmentalist wackos who put Brandon Darby on a hit list. Hmmmm.

Third, listening to a Brett Kimberlin song’s treatment of the loving relationships among family members reminded me of Bruno Graz’s brilliant performance in Downfall. I don’t mean the scene that has been the subject of all those parodies. Graz’s performance showed a view of a man who was throughly evil and yet was kind to many around him. Mark Singer’s portrait of TDPK in Citizen K shows a similar, albeit less powerful, personality.

I’m Not Making This Up, You Know


Brett Kimberlin fancies himself a great musician. (H/T, Kimberlin Unmaksked)

The term “delusions of adequacy” comes to mind.

UPDATE—Here’s a statement made by a Justice Through Music Project spokesman (not Brett Kimberlin) about the time this video was released:

We want videos that have staying power, that make a cultural statement, and that have an emotional component to them so that they will influence youth. Politicians spend hundreds of millions if not billions of dollars on ads to influence middle class America, and they basically ignore young people totally; and we feel like the music videos are like the cultural statements or the ads for young people, so we hope to get them involved and influence them to make the right decision in November.

Uh, huh.

Dread Musician #BrettKimberlin: Year in Review


The most popular of the hundreds of posts about Brett Kimberlin was not about his lawfare or his Dread Piracy. It was about his musicianship. Here it is with an update at the end—

Back in 2002, Brett Kimberlin fronted a band named Epoxy and released a CD called Nothing Else. The story he spun promoting the album was that it contained songs that he had written while he was being held as a political prisoner in the federal prison system.

The band consisted of Brett Kimberlin on guitar and vocals, Wade Matthews on Bass, and Robbie White on Drums. The genre of the album is someplace between grunge and punk, neither of which are among my favorite musical forms.

Let me first comment on Mr. Kimberlin’s voice. I had heard his speaking voice in court, and I understand why some people refer to it as whinny. His singing voice reminds me of the silly voice that Weird Al uses on tracks such as Eat It. Mrs. Hoge, who listened through the CD with me, said, “Eddie Haskell.” On most of the tracks his voice was off key, usually flat.

Most of the songs could have been filler tracks on a generic grunge album. Some of the alienation in them seems to be more appropriate for a 17 year old, not someone 30 years older. Mr. Kimberlin was in his late 40s when the recording was made. However, three of the songs stood out. Vicegrip was actually interesting musically. Donuts had clever lyrics. It’s about lousy prison food and would probably get a nod of approval from G. Gordon Liddy.

Then there’s the last cut Keyhole. It was outstandingly bad. Mrs. Hoge and I met while we were in the music business, and during her career as a recording engineer, she recorded more gold and platinum records than I did. Her comment was, “If you’re gonna mike a guitar that close, you should use a better guitar and make sure it’s in tune. And get a better guitar player.”

While he didn’t do especially well with the acoustic guitar on Keyhole, Brett Kimberlin is actually a reasonably good guitarist. He probably couldn’t cut it in Nashville or LA, but could make a living in a minor market (such as Seattle) or playing the Holiday Inn circuit. Indeed, the world would be a better place if he did ignore the usual advice and give up his day job.

Nothing Else by Epoxy (Pollen Records, $16.04 from Amazon) is interesting because of who recorded it, but I can’t honestly recommend it for the musical experience it offers.

UPDATE—Aaron Walker’s review of music videos by Op-Critical, The Dread Pirate Kimberlin’s latest band, can be found here. On 5 December, TDPK and Op-Critical released a new music video called “Coal Miner’s Family.” It’s lurking on YouTube, and it deserves a review.

First, a decade of practice has not made any significant improvement in TDPK’s musicianship. The song is supposed to be about a family caught up in the Upper Big Branch mining disaster of 2010. The band seems to be striving to sound like an Appalachian folk group, but it doesn’t seem to have the chops to get there. Instead, it hits that level of mediocrity one hears from urban local bands at East Coast bluegrass festivals.

Second, the choice of subject matter is interesting. Op-Critical is the house band for Justice Through Music Project, an organization with the stated purpose of using “famous musicians and bands to organize, educate and activate young people about the importance of civil rights, human rights and voting.” How a mining disaster relates to that escapes me, but I notice that over the past year, JTMP has promoted anti-natural-resource-development causes such as the Tour de Frack. And now it’s taking on coal mining. And it has a major donor with possible connections to the environmentalist wackos who put Brandon Darby on a hit list. Hmmmm.

Third, listening to a Brett Kimberlin song’s treatment of the loving relationships among family members reminded me of Bruno Graz’s brilliant performance in Downfall. I don’t mean the scene that has been the subject of all those parodies. Graz’s performance showed a view of a man who was throughly evil and yet was kind to many around him. Mark Singer’s portrait of TDPK in Citizen K shows a similar, albeit less powerful, personality.

Well, that’s 2012 in review for TDPK. Tomorrow is New Year’s Day, and it will be another day off. Tune in on Wednesday for new material for the New Year.

Where Does #BrettKimberlin’s Music Get Publicity?


There seems to be a dearth of coverage, except at one website in particular.

The brass knuckle publicity management doesn’t seem to work any more, does it? We are controlling transmission. If we wish to make it louder, we will bring up the volume. If we wish to make it softer, we will tune it to a whisper.

Justice through blogging. And then the courts.

#BrettKimberlin and Op-Critical


Tuesday night, I posted a review of the CD released by Brett Kimberlin’s previous band Epoxy. His most recent music group is called Op-Critical. The band has a website, a rather stale one that doesn’t appear to have been updated for several years.

While nosing about the site, I found these lyrics as part of a song called Fork

I am losing all control and I just don’t know what to do …

Yep, we are controlling transmission. If we wish to make it louder, we will bring up the volume. If we wish to make it softer, we will tune it to a whisper. We will control the horizontal. We will control the vertical. We can roll the image, make it flutter. We can change the focus to a soft blur or sharpen it to crystal clarity.

You have gone past the outer limit of what you might have been able to control, but the truth will bring clarity. But clarity may not be your friend.