Hubble Versus My Backyard Telescope


ngc7027N7027lredsgNGC 7027 is one of the brightest nebulae in the sky, but it has never been given a common name. In a 6-in telescope at around 50x it appears as a relatively bright bluish star. I didn’t take the picture on the right, but it’s the sort of view I get with my backyard telescope. The Hubble image above shows a bit more detail.

Before being studied via Hubble, NGC 7027 was thought to be a proto-planetary nebula with the central star too cool to ionize any of the gas. It is now known to be a planetary nebula in the earliest stage of its development with a central star is believed to have been about 3 to 4 times the mass of the Sun.

Image Credit: NASA

NGC 7027


NGC 7027 is a very young and dense planetary nebula about 3,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Cygnus Only a few hundred years old, it’s a tiny infant. Indeed, it’s one of the smallest planetary nebulae, only 0.2 by 0.1 light-year. Most planetary nebulae are around 1 light-year across. NGC 7027 has a very complex structure, consisting of inner elliptical region of ionized gas inside of a large cloud of neutral gas.

The white dwarf at the core of the nebula has a mass about 70 percent of the Sun’s. The expanding halo has roughly three times the mass of the Sun.

Image Credit: NASA / ESA

A Nebula Without a Name


ngc7027N7027lredsgNGC 7027 is one of the brightest nebulae in the sky, but it has never been given a common name. In a 6-in telescope at around 50x it appears as a relatively bright bluish star. This Hubble image above shows a bit more detail.

Before being studied via Hubble, NGC 7027 was thought to be a proto-planetary nebula with the central star too cool to ionize any of the gas. It is now known to be a planetary nebula in the earliest stage of its development with a central star is believed to have been about 3 to 4 times the mass of the Sun.

Image Credit: NASA

NGC 7027


NGC 7027 is a very young (only about 600 years old) and dense planetary nebula located roughly 3,000 light-years away in the constellation Cygnus. NGC 7027 is one of the visually brightest planetary nebulae. In a 6-in telescope at 50x it appears as a relatively bright bluish star. At magnifications around 180x it has a vaguely ursine shape which has led to the nickname “Gummy Bear Nebula”. It is best viewed with the highest magnification possible. This image was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope.

Image Credit: NASA

A Nebula With No Name


ngc7027N7027lredsgNGC 7027 is one of the brightest nebulae in the sky, but it has never been given a common name. In a 6-in telescope at around 50x it appears as a relatively bright bluish star. This Hubble image above shows a bit more detail.

Before being studied via Hubble, NGC 7027 was thought to be a proto-planetary nebula with the central star too cool to ionize any of the gas. It is now known to be a planetary nebula in the earliest stage of its development with a central star is believed to have been about 3 to 4 times the mass of the Sun.

Image Credit: NASA