Meanwhile, at the SPLC …


… there’s been a bit of a shakeup. The left-wing hate group has fired its founder and airbrushed his bio from their website. Morris Dees’ sudden transition to unpersonhood has been met with smiles for the karmic irony by some, including my podcasting partner Stacy McCain.

Newsbusters reports that SPLC internal emails have surfaced that contain “complaints regarding sexual harassment and racial biases in promotion and hierarchy.” Of course, such complaints are grounds for firing in the current SJW environment, but in Dees’ case they’re not new. Similar allegations appeared in the Montgomery Advertiser in 1994.

Why fire Dees now?

Discovery. The SPLC settled one lawsuit for over 3,000,000 bucks rather than go through the discovery process and trial. There are other suits pending, and the discovery process can be messy, especially if one has something to hide. It may be that they think that throwing their founder under the bus will appease their critics and moderate their losses. If that’s the case, they don’t understand how people on the right think.

Stay tuned.

Twenty Years Ago This Week


It was twenty years ago that Bill Clinton was impeached for lying under oath during a deposition in a civil suit related to a sexual harassment claim. The 1995 Blog takes a look back at that process and comes to the conclusion that it looks better now than it did twenty years ago.

Clinton lied under oath, and sought to impede justice in a sexual harassment lawsuit in which he was the defendant. The lawsuit was brought by Paula Jones, a former employee of the state of Arkansas who said that Clinton, while he was the state’s governor, crudely propositioned her at a hotel room in Little Rock.

During his deposition in the Jones lawsuit, Clinton was asked about Lewinsky. He denied having had sexual relations with her; he denied having been alone with her. Presiding at Clinton’s deposition, taken in January 1998, was a federal judge, Susan Webber Wright.

She was there at Clinton’s request, and she later found that Clinton had given “intentionally false” testimony at the “tainted deposition” and that his “false, misleading and evasive answers … were designed to obstruct the judicial process.”

The judge found Clinton in contempt, and the House of Representatives wound up impeaching him on one count of perjury and one count of obstruction of justice.

One may argue whether or not the Senate did the right thing by failing to convict, but looking back, it seems the House did the right thing by censuring Clinton’s lawless behavior.

Democrats Win Control Of The House As #MeToo Loses


She Guevara will be going to the House of Representatives to provide comic relief, and as of 6:30 am ET, the Democrats have flipped at least one more seat than they need to take control of the House. They’ll use the coming two years of divided government to be as disruptive as possible.

Meanwhile, the #MeToo movement has suffered two serious setbacks.

First, as Jim Geraghty put it, “Once again, Keith Ellison beat someone.” Over a million Democrats voted for him to be the Attorney General of Minnesota, refusing to believe a woman whose claims of abuse were backed up by evidence.

Second, as of 6:30 am ET, the only Democrat senator who faced a serious challenge to reelection and who has won was Manchin—who was the only one who voted for the Kavanaugh nomination. Donnelly, Heitkamp, McCaskill, and Nelson have bitten the dust in Indiana, North Dakota, Missouri, and Florida, and Tester is behind in Montana. Political movements that can’t deliver votes have little clout. Those that are a liability on election day have none.

Politicians Acting Bad


So what did the Canadians think they were getting when the gave the Liberals a majority and allowed Trudeau to form a government?

He’s not the first person with the kind of ego needed to be a national-level politician who has felt entitled to take what he wants when he wants it. He won’t be the last.