Team Kimberlin Post of the Day

Brett Kimberlin is still trying to find a way to get out of his Speedway Bombing conviction. He’s petitioning the Supreme Court to review the Seventh Circuit’s denial of his latest appeal. He was convicted over 40 years ago.

The TKPOTD for nine years ago today looked at Mark Singer’s conclusion about Kimberlin’s guilt. Singer spend several years in the ’90s researching and writing Kimberlin’s authorized biography.

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Mark Singer spent four years researching Brett Kimberlin while writing Citizen K. One of his conclusions was that Kimberlin exploited the tiniest perceived crack in the details of a story in order to spin things his way. On page 323, Singer reviews Kimberlin’s defense during his third bombing trial.

[I]t was those flaws that empowered Brett Kimberlin to obscure the truth. He did his cleverest  work in the interstices, and I spent months wandering through his disclaimers and prevarications before deciding, finally, that this was a case of homework, along with truth, being eaten by the dog, pissed on by the cat, and buried in the backyard. In Kimberlin’s case, the scenario was: I didn’t do the bombings; my brother Scott did, or else his friend Scott, or maybe my brother’s friend Joe. Besides, it wasn’t really bombings that put me in prison, but a right-wing political conspiracy. The government is corrupt, and I’ve always been a prisoner of war. If the eyewitness, Lynn Coleman, lied, then everybody else is a perjurer. If hypnosis witnesses were impeachable, the entire case is a dishonest confection.

When Kimberlin delivered a similarly sanctimonious oration at his sentencing hearing, he apparently believed in his innocence. At the end of the day, I decidedly did not.

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The government has filed is opposition brief to Kimberlin’s petition. His reply brief would normally be due 14 days after the opposition, but the 14th day is Thanksgiving. The court is closed for the holiday and the day after, so he has until Monday to file a reply.

Stay tuned.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day

I’ve noted from time to time that Brett Kimberlin is a liar. Of course, I’m not the first person to say so. Six years ago today, I published this post titled Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin and the Persistence of Memory.

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the_persistence_of_memory_-_1931_salvador_daliWhen Mark Singer began writing his book Citizen K, he generally believed the claims made by TDPK. He learned his lesson. Chapter 35 is devoted to the differences between the stories Brett Kimberlin told and those of other witnesses.

Once I compared Kimberlin’s renderings of certain incidents with the recollections of other witnesses, the recurring theme of “jumping the connection” almost always emerged. When a dope dealer jumped a connection, he eliminated a middleman, hoping to cut his costs without increasing his risk. Now, both literally and figuratively, it seemed that Kimberlin has this same habit. Figurative instances were narratives in which he claimed center stage, though in reality he’d participated at a distant remove or not at all. Or, when it suited his purposes, he might do just the opposite, ascribing to others acts he in fact had performed himself.

Given the behavior I have personally witnessed in Maryland and Virginia courtrooms, he does not seem changed.

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And based on my experience over the past six years, I can repeat my conclusion that The Dread Deadbeat Prevaricator Kimberlin hasn’t changed.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day

Brett Kimberlin got caught lying to a federal grand jury and wound up convicted of perjury. He was asked about his dealing LSD to a two guys named John Buckley and David Pacific. He claimed, based on the fact that the Indiana State Police had busted Buckley and Pacific for attempting to operate a lab to produce psilocybin, that they were making LSD.

During a July, 1972, sentencing hearing for a cocaine bust while he was a juvenile, Kimberlin was asked:

Q. Did you ever sell any LSD to David Pacific or Jenkins, John Jenkins?
A. No, I wouldn’t be selling it to Pacific or John Buckley because they are the ones that had the laboratory, they are the ones that made it all. If I was to do anything I would get it from them. That’s my answer.

He repeated that testimony in October before a grand jury. A second grand jury was convened, and it indicted Kimberlin for perjury. He was convicted.

Through the years, Kimberlin has claimed that Buckley and Pacific lied about him as part of a deal with the feds. When he was working with his biographer Mark Singer, Kimberlin claimed that Cody Shearer, one of the people who had helped him promote his tale about selling marijuana to Dan Quayle, had confronted Buckley and Pacific and that they had acknowledge lying. When Singer checked with Shearer, Shearer said that he had never discussed LSD or perjury with them.

Beginning at the bottom of p. 316 in Citizen K, Mark Singer writes:

Sifting through this heap of mendacity , I asked myself whether Kimberlin lies for sport or whether an assortment of small lies coalesced into a gang of tar babies that encircled him. When I first heard about Pacific and Buckley, they amounted to an interesting brick in my wall; their role in Kimberlin’s life never rose to a sinister level. Ultimately, they signified his willingness to stay wedded to a falsehood despite black-and-white evidence to the contrary. My metaphor metamorphosed. The Pacific-Buckley factoid—the news report of their arrest, along with Kimberlin’s claim of their perjury to frame him for same—was no longer a constructive brick but one of many blind turns in a labyrinth of misinformation.

Or to put it more simply: Brett Kimberlin tells lies, and he seems to do so even when he knows there is documentary evidence proving him a liar.