Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


One thing for sure about Team Kimberlin is that they’re a bunch of liars—and incompetent liars who wind up easily caught. Indeed, Brett Kimberlin’s first conviction was for perjury about his LSD dealing. It was seven years ago today that this post about A Liar Selling Drugs first ran.

* * * * *

Continuing with our recent Dread Pirate Kimberlin v. Reality theme, let’s take another look into Chapter 35 of Citizen K by Mark Singer. The Gentle Reader who is familiar with TDPK knows that his first jail term was for perjury during grand jury testimony related to selling LSD.

In 1992, when Kimberlin told me that he trafficked only in marijuana and hashish—besides cocaine just that once—he stated emphatically that he had never sold LSD. “I don’t remember ever selling any hallucinogens. I mean, it’s possible, like, five hits of this or that. But it’s not in my memory base.” He also said, “I’ve never even seen amphetamines.” Yet the same court transcript contained his testimony that he had dealt in small quantities of LSD and methamphetamine. He had bought amphetamines and given them to this girlfriend, he said, because she was trying to lose weight.

Kimberlin exploited the fact that [David] Pacific and [John] Buckley were arrested on drug charges in October 1971, when according to a report in the Indianapolis News, more than $20,000 worth of laboratory equipment was confiscated. But in a 1994 meeting, Pacific told me the “laboratory equipment” was actually vegetable-canning paraphernalia plus a few flasks and petri dishes … the by-product of his and Buckley’s failed experiment to synthesize psilocybin. They had never, he maintained, tried to manufacture LSD. Why go to the trouble when the finished product was so accessible at the cost of about seven cents a hit?

“So you and Buckley weren’t making acid?”

“Oh, no. Good heavens, no,” said Pacific—a quaint-sounding denial that encouraged me to check with the prosecutor, Scott Miller, a former assistant U. S. attorney who’d headed the Bureau of Narcotics “strike-force grand jury,” stated that Pacific and Buckley weren’t manufacturers of LSD but mere jobbers. Though Miller suspected that Kimberlin was one of their suppliers, he opted to pursue a perjury indictment rather than a drug indictment. The government’s general impression was corroborated by Tim Young, who told me that Brett was his source in several “multithousand-hit deals.”

“I probably sold fifty to seventy-five thousand hits of acid in my life, over a year and a half period,” Young said. “Purple microdot and orange sunshine are the two I remember. How much of it from Brett? All of it. I don’t remember buying acid from anyone but Brett. He sold it to me about ten thousand hits at a time. If he said he never sold acid, he’s a lying [redacted]. Guarantee.”

Isn’t it amazing how much of TDPK’s narrative seems to be contradicted by other witnesses, court transcripts, and the like?

* * * * *

I used to work in Indiana. FWIW, I met both David Pacific and John Buckley on separate occasions before the Speedway Bombings occurred. Based on my personal knowledge of them and what I have also learned from mutual acquaintances, I’d be much more inclined to believe them, especially David Pacific, that The Dread Deadbeat Perjurer Kimberlin.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


I’m not the only person who views The Dread Deadbeat Prevaricator Kimberlin as a liar. Mark Singer, the author of Citizen K, Kimberlin’s authorized biography, believes he was lied to by his subject. The TKPOTD from five years ago today deals with one of the lies Singer caught. It relates to Kimberlin’s drug dealing in Bloomington and his perjury conviction. As you’ll see below, my own research verified Singer’s.

* * * * *

Brett Kimberlin got caught lying to a federal grand jury and wound up convicted of perjury. He was asked about his dealing LSD to a two guys named John Buckley and David Pacific. He claimed, based on the fact that the Indiana State Police had busted Buckley and Pacific for attempting to operate a lab to produce psilocybin, that they were making LSD.

During a July, 1972, sentencing hearing for a cocaine bust while he was a juvenile, Kimberlin was asked:

Q. Did you ever sell any LSD to David Pacific or Jenkins, John Jenkins?
A. No, I wouldn’t be selling it to Pacific or John Buckley because they are the ones that had the laboratory, they are the ones that made it all. If I was to do anything I would get it from them. That’s my answer.

He repeated that testimony in October before a grand jury. A second grand jury was convened, and it indicted Kimberlin for perjury. He was convicted.

Through the years, Kimberlin has claimed that Buckley and Pacific lied about him as part of a deal with the feds. When he was working with his biographer Mark Singer, Kimberlin claimed that Cody Shearer, one of the people who had helped him promote his tale about selling marijuana to Dan Quayle, had confronted Buckley and Pacific and that they had acknowledge lying. When Singer checked with Shearer, Shearer said that he had never discussed LSD or perjury with them.

Beginning at the bottom of p. 316 in Citizen K, Mark Singer writes:

Sifting through this heap of mendacity , I asked myself whether Kimberlin lies for sport or whether an assortment of small lies coalesced into a gang of tar babies that encircled him. When I first heard about Pacific and Buckley, they amounted to an interesting brick in my wall; their role in Kimberlin’s life never rose to a sinister level. Ultimately, they signified his willingness to stay wedded to a falsehood despite black-and-white evidence to the contrary. My metaphor metamorphosed. The Pacific-Buckley factoid—the news report of their arrest, along with Kimberlin’s claim of their perjury to frame him for same—was no longer a constructive brick but one of many blind turns in a labyrinth of misinformation.

Or to put it more simply: Brett Kimberlin tells lies, and he seems to do so even when he knows there is documentary evidence proving him a liar.

* * * * *

I was able to confirm Singer’s findings via my own personal contacts from Bloomington.

I began dating Mrs. Hoge just as she was finishing her degree in Audio Production from Indiana University in Bloomington. While she was in school, she worked part-time doing audio work at various music venues around Bloomington, often working for the sound company owned by David Pacific. I wound up meeting both Pacific and Buckley during visits with Connie almost 40 years ago. One day, it may be useful to share more of what I know through my Bloomington connections.