Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


I’ve spent a sizable portion of the past seven years dealing with absurd demands for various members of Team Kimberlin. Some of the sillies have come from The Dreadful Pro-Se Schmalfeldt. The TKPOTD for four years ago today opened with ridicule of one of the Cabin Boy’s™ demands and also posted one of the motions to dismiss I filed in LOLsuit IV: The Voyage to Oblivion.

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Now that so many other people are archiving his blogging, I no longer regularly read the Dreadful Pro-Se Schmalfeldt meanderings on his blog du jour. I’m told that he wants to charge me a license fee for using his name and and image in my reporting about him and his buddies with Team Kimberlin.

Bwahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha!

Before making such a foolish assertion, he should have talked to a lawyer who could have explained case law such as Lawrence v. A. S. Abell Co., 299 Md. 697 (1984) to him.

And in other news concerning the Cabin Boy™ …

Yesterday, I mailed a reply to his opposition to my motion to dismiss his current LOLsuit for improper venue to the court. I also served the Cabin Boy™ by mail.

The reply speaks for itself, and I do not intend to make any further substantive public statements about the motion until the court has ruled on it.

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Because the judge found that Schmalfeldt had sued me in the wrong court, she was able to dismiss the case without having to bother considering whether the Cabin Boy™ had stated a claim upon which relief could be granted.

None of the LOLsuits he’s filed against me have ever made it past a motion to dismiss for venue or lack of personal jurisdiction.

Losing losers gotta loose.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


On 17 March, 2015, Judge Hazel dismissed all but one count against one defendant of the Kimberlin v. National Bloggers Club, et al. (I) RICO Madness LOLsuit. The very next day, The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin filed a motion for reconsideration of the dismissal of the count alleging violation of the Ku Klux Klan Act against the defendants. Judge Hazel didn’t waste time deny that motion as I reported four years ago with a post In Re RICO Madness.

BTW, the marked up sentence in UPDATE 2 is from a motion that The Dreadful Pro-Se Schmalfeldt had filed in Schmalfeldt v. Hoge, et al. (II) a few days before.

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Judge Hazel has denied The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin’s motion for reconsideration of dismissal of the Ku Klux Klan Act claims against all defendants in the Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness.

Qapla’!

UPDATE—The money quote—

Kimberlin is mistaken.

UPDATE 2—FIFY:Explain_the_lawUPDATE 3—Aaron Walker compares Kimberlin’s RICO Madness to Generalissimo Franco.

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Crackpot leftists often seem to have trouble accepting a loss.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Four years ago today, Bill Schmalfeldt filed LOLsuit III: The Search for Schlock in the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland. I took notice of his action in a post titled In Re a LOLsuit.

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The Dreadful Pro-Se Schmalfeldt is at it again.

He has also filed an application to proceed in forma pauperis.

I do not plan to make any substantive comment on this suit until I have thoroughly reviewed the complaint.

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Now that the suit is long dead, I’ll offer this comment: Bwahahahahahahahahahah!

Although the suit could have been dismissed for failure to state a claim upon which relief could be granted, the judge didn’t have to get that far into the complaint. TDPS had filed in the wrong court, so the case was kicked for lack of jurisdiction. That led the Cabin Boy™ to file LOLsuit IV: The Voyage to Oblivion in the Circuit Court for Howard County, Maryland. Although that suit could have been dismissed for failure to state a claim upon which relief could be granted, the judge didn’t have to get that far into the complaint. Schmalfeldt had filed his state complaint in the wrong county, so the suit was dismissed for lack of jurisdiction.

The Cabin Boy™ left me out of his lawfare attempts until he got around to filing LOLsuit VIII: Avoiding Contact in the U.S. District Court for the District of South Carolina. Although the suit could have been dismissed for failure to state a claim upon which relief could be granted, the judge didn’t have to get that far into the complaint. The judge found that … wait for it … the court lacked personal jurisdiction over any of the defendants, so the case was dismissed for lack of jurisdiction.

Everything proceeded as I had foreseen.