Some Interesting (and Snarky) Questions


Jeff Dunetz has a post over at The Lid asking some questions about how things will go in the aftermath of the House Impeachment Hoax. This one’s my favorite.

When nasty Nancy ripped up the copy of the State of the Union Address, Speaker Pelosi broke the record for pettiness. Wouldn’t it be fun if, at next year’s SOTU, President Trump gave Pelosi the transcript of his speech on an iPad? I, for one, would love to see her struggle to break the screen when Trump’s speech was over.

Perhaps Shadow can create an app for that.

And the week isn’t over yet.

Dodging a Bullet


The Democrats just got lucky. Now that the Senate has shut down the possibility of further witnesses and testimony, they no longer face the prospect of testimony by Joe or Hunter Biden under oath in the Impeachment Hoax Trial. But that’s not their big win. Trashing the Biden presidential campaign would probably be worth it for the Democrats if they could bring down Donald Trump. What might not be worthwhile from their point of view would be the stories that would come to light in the truthful testimony of individuals such as Eric Ciaramella or Alexandra Chalupa.

There is a reasonable argument to be made for moving on from the House Impeachment Hoax and letting it fade away. That argument is reasonable, but it is also wrong. The Democrats have failed again in their effort to overturn the 2016 election, but they don’t yet seem to have grasped the fact that they’ve lost. They’ll be back for another return grudge match, and they’ll keep coming back until they are finally convinced that they’ve been defeated. (In this sense, they’re not unlike certain Germans after WWI.)

Therefore, there is a strong case to be made for going forward with vigorous investigations, both criminal by the Justice Department and political by the Senate, into the underlying crimes associated with the 2016 election and the subsequent coverups. The facts need to come out, and the bad actors should be held to account. Some politicians should be voted out of office, some bureaucrats’ careers should end, and some people should go to jail. (Note that I wrote “should.” Some corrupt constituencies will reelect corrupt politicians.)

That won’t end the competition between the Left and the Right or between populists and elitists, but it would bring the 2016 election debacle to closure.

The BBC’s Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day


The 31st of January, 2020—the day for Brexit.

Also, the day that the BBC is having to report the apparent collapse of the House Impeachment Hoax. (Assuming Senator Alexander holds firm.)

Our betters seem to be having the worst of it on both sides of the Atlantic today.

I think I’ll go get another cup of coffee and put a bag of popcorn in the microwave.

A First Class Villain?


There’s a certain comic aspect to Adam Schiff as he spews his lies while prosecuting the House Impeachment Hoax. I suppose that if he were a bit better looking,  a comparison to Snidely Whiplash might be in order. However, what Schiff is doing isn’t only comic. It’s dangerous, so these suggestions by Frank Miele in an article over at Real Clear Politics may be more apt.

Watching Schiff spin his yarns as chief House manager for the impeachment trial of Donald J. Trump reminds me of the great dissemblers of Shakespeare, such as “Honest Iago,” who is only comfortable in his own skin when he is making the skin of others crawl. The “motiveless malignity” that poet Samuel Taylor Coleridge ascribed to Iago is writ large in the perfunctory perfidy that Schiff practices with unassuming ease. He would destroy a king, but he assures us he takes no pleasure in it, wink-wink, nod-nod.

Perhaps I am giving Schiff too much credit. He might be more akin to Monsieur Parolles of “All’s Well That Ends Well,” the arrogant know-it-all whose own words come back to haunt him: “He will lie, sir, with such volubility, that you would think truth were a fool.”

Hmmmm.