Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin and Form 990


Organizations exempt from tax under sections 501(c)3 and 501(c)4 of the Internal Revenue Code are supposed to file a Form 990 with the IRS by the 15th day of the fifth month following the end of the organization’s fiscal year. The previous fillings by Justice Through Music Project and Velvet Revolution US indicate a fiscal year that is the same as the calendar year. Thus, their filings should normally due on 15 May. Two extensions of three months each are possible, so the final drop dead date for filing is 15 November.

I’ve been on the lookout for the 2011 filings from these “charities,” and they have yet to appear on the usual sites such as Guidestar or Foundation Center—even though their forms should have been filed more than a month ago. Therefore, I’ve submitted Form 4506-As asking the IRS for copies of the filings from both JTMP and VRUS.

It’ll be interesting to see the changes from 2010 to 2011.

Following The Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin’s Money Trail


When one lays out the IRS Form 990s for Justice Through Music Project from 2005 through 2010 side-by-side, some … ah … interesting things can be found. Here is a table that summarizes the total revenue and the total “occupancy” expenses claimed:

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There’s nothing especially unusual about the Revenue line. There were a couple of above average years when the economy was in better shape, and donations fell as the economy tanked.

<mockery>OTOH, the Occupancy line suggests some questions. Someone who wasn’t aware of JTMP’s history might assume that the 2005 figure was a partial year’s rent on a small office space and that the 2006 number covered a full year of the same space. The rate would be believable for Montgomery County, Maryland. The 2007 figure could be explained as growing into bigger quarters plus some moving expenses. The 2009/2010 data could be the result of a favorable rate from a landlord desperate to keep a property rented. It’s much more difficult to dream up a scenario that explains the amount claimed for 2008. Still, the casual observer might not be suspicious.

I’m very suspicious. TDPK has operated JTMP out of a corner of his mother’s basement. Perhaps one could justify paying a couple of hundred bucks a month for rent and a bit more for heat and electricity. But $80,925! As I said, I’m suspicious, especially since JTMP does not appear to have any other premises other than the Kimberlin basement.

Now if an engineer who is looking at this stuff in his spare time is suspicious, guess what might happen if a forensic account got his hands on JTMP’s books. Is it any wonder why TDPK doesn’t want to turn these records over as demanded in discovery in the Virginia Walker v. Kimberlin, et al. case?</mockery>

There’s a hearing scheduled in the case on 9 November. TDPK has filed motions to dismiss the case and for a protective order against discovery. We’ll see how the judge rules on them. It’s also possible that Aaron Walker’s lawyer may file motions that could be heard at the same time. Prepare for things to get interesting.

Meanwhile, there’s plenty of strange things to explore concerning TDPK.

Stay tuned.

UPDATE—Instalanche! Thank you, Prof. Reynolds! And welcome, Instapundit readers! There’s more coverage of the Saga of TDPK (and plenty of mockery) to be found here at Hogewash! Please click on the Home link in the menu bar and scroll around.