Team Kimberlin Post of the Day

False narratives. That’s what Brett Kimberlin called truthful reporting about him and his activities. As the TKPOTD for five years ago today noted, he used that term quite a bit in the false claims he made in his various LOLsuits.

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The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin sure does like the phrase “false narrative(s).” For example, …false narrativesNot once does he follow up on any claim that a “narrative” is “false” with specific facts proving his allegation.

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The one time The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin managed to get a case to trial, he lost because he had no specific facts to place in evidence in support of his allegations.

Choosing Not to Choose

Matthew Stewart has a post over at City Journal titled Multiculturalism, or Cultural Appropriation? in which he make a case that Progressives need to decide between one or the other. It looks at history and the facts and concludes

Another puzzling aspect of the cultural-appropriation focus is that it seems clearly to clash with another progressive imperative: the need to nurture multicultural appreciation. Multiculturalism has been a prominent cause among progressives for more than a generation, but today, admiration for other cultures apparently comes with a warning sign: look, but don’t adopt, lest you face accusations of “theft” or insensitivity.

Most reasonable people have no trouble understanding that to adopt an artifact or practice doesn’t diminish the culture from which it originates. “You can’t steal a culture,” as Columbia University linguist John McWhorter has observed. Cultural exchange is enriching, not impoverishing, and imitation remains, as in the old formulation, the sincerest form of flattery. It’s time for progressives to decide between embracing multiculturalism or policing “cultural appropriation.” They can’t have it both ways.

The Progressive position flies in the face of the logical principle that A is not not-A which our culture inherited from the ancient Greeks. But Progressives never let logic or the facts get in the way of their desire to be in control. O’Brien explained it this way—

‘You are a slow learner, Winston,’ said O’Brien gently.

‘How can I help it?’ he blubbered. ‘How can I help seeing what is in front of my eyes? Two and two are four.’

‘Sometimes, Winston. Sometimes they are five. Sometimes they are three. Sometimes they are all of them at once. You must try harder. It is not easy to become sane.’

And have you noticed that Progressives keep trying to change the meanings of words?

Like What?

That’s a question posed by Congresscritter-elect Dan Crenshaw (R-TX) when a recently elected Democrat accused Donald Trump of undermining democracy. The Democrat was unable to cite any example of democracy being undermined. Perhaps a skeptical public should begin asking that question more often.

There was “deliberate interference” with the election in Georgia.

Like what?

[crickets]

Or …

There’s evidence of Russian collusion with the Trump campaign during the 2016 elections.

Like what?

[crickets]

The lack of evidence to support a claim reasonably suggests that the claim might be fishy. John Adams once observed that facts are stubborn things, and that stubbornness can be a problem for some political arguments. I expect that we will see more appeals to Homer Simpson’s notion that “[f]acts are meaningless. You could use facts to prove anything that’s even remotely true!” Especially when those stubborn facts get in the way of The Narrative.