Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


It’s the seventh anniversary of the post that’s had the most hits here at Hogewash!Review: “Nothing Else” by Epoxy (#BrettKimberlin).

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Back in 2002, Brett Kimberlin fronted a band named Epoxy and released a CD called Nothing Else. The story he spun promoting the album was that it contained songs that he had written while he was being held as a political prisoner in the federal prison system.

The band consisted of Brett Kimberlin on guitar and vocals, Wade Matthews on Bass, and Robbie White on Drums. The genre of the album is someplace between grunge and punk, neither of which are among my favorite musical forms.

Let me first comment on Mr. Kimberlin’s voice. I had heard his speaking voice in court, and I understand why some people refer to it as whinny. His singing voice reminds me of the silly voice that Weird Al uses on tracks such as Eat It. Mrs. Hoge, who listened through the CD with me, said, “Eddie Haskell.” On most of the tracks his voice was off key, usually flat.

Most of the songs could have been filler tracks on a generic grunge album. Some of the alienation in them seems to be more appropriate for a 17 year old, not someone 30 years older. Mr. Kimberlin was in his late 40s when the recording was made. However, three of the songs stood out. Vicegrip was actually interesting musically. Donuts had clever lyrics. It’s about lousy prison food and would probably get a nod of approval from G. Gordon Liddy.

Then there’s the last cut Keyhole. It was outstandingly bad. Mrs. Hoge and I met while we were in the music business, and during her career as a recording engineer, she recorded more gold and platinum records than I did. Her comment was, “If you’re gonna mike a guitar that close, you should use a better guitar and make sure it’s in tune. And get a better guitar player.”

While he didn’t do especially well with the acoustic guitar on Keyhole, Brett Kimberlin is actually a reasonably good guitarist. He probably couldn’t cut it in Nashville or LA, but could make a living in a minor market (such as Seattle) or playing the Holiday Inn circuit. Indeed, the world would be a better place if he did ignore the usual advice and give up his day job.

Nothing Else by Epoxy (Pollen Records, $16.04 from Amazon) is interesting because of who recorded it, but I can’t honestly recommend it for the musical experience it offers.

* * * * *

This exchange from a somewhat delayed comment is a favorite of mine—

In one of his multitude of LOLsuits, The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin complained that the reporting here at Hogewash! was interfering with his business as a musician and composer. Certainly, the review above could be characterized as adverse. OTOH, the Gentle Reader can check out the Op-Critical and Justice Through Music video still lurking on YouTube and form his own opinion concerning TDPK’s talent and commercial viability as a musician.

In another of his LOLsuits, The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin claimed that part of his job description at Justice Through Music Project included filing lawsuits “seeking redress in federal court for violations of his civil and statutory rights.” Considering his track record, it may be that his day job has given up on him.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The most widely viewed post ever published here at Hogewash! was this review that Mrs. Hoge and I did in July, 2012, of the CD Nothing Else by Bret Kimberlin’s band Epoxy.

* * * * *

Back in 2002, Brett Kimberlin fronted a band named Epoxy and released a CD called Nothing Else. The story he spun promoting the album was that it contained songs that he had written while he was being held as a political prisoner in the federal prison system.

The band consisted of Brett Kimberlin on guitar and vocals, Wade Matthews on Bass, and Robbie White on Drums. The genre of the album is someplace between grunge and punk, neither of which are among my favorite musical forms.

Let me first comment on Mr. Kimberlin’s voice. I had heard his speaking voice in court, and I understand why some people refer to it as whinny. His singing voice reminds me of the silly voice that Weird Al uses on tracks such as Eat It. Mrs. Hoge, who listened through the CD with me, said, “Eddie Haskell.” On most of the tracks his voice was off key, usually flat.

Most of the songs could have been filler tracks on a generic grunge album. Some of the alienation in them seems to be more appropriate for a 17 year old, not someone 30 years older. Mr. Kimberlin was in his late 40s when the recording was made. However, three of the songs stood out. Vicegrip was actually interesting musically. Donuts had clever lyrics. It’s about lousy prison food and would probably get a nod of approval from G. Gordon Liddy.

Then there’s the last cut Keyhole. It was outstandingly bad. Mrs. Hoge and I met while we were in the music business, and during her career as a recording engineer, she recorded more gold and platinum records than I did. Her comment was, “If you’re gonna mike a guitar that close, you should use a better guitar and make sure it’s in tune. And get a better guitar player.”

While he didn’t do especially well with the acoustic guitar on Keyhole, Brett Kimberlin is actually a reasonably good guitarist. He probably couldn’t cut it in Nashville or LA, but could make a living in a minor market (such as Seattle) or playing the Holiday Inn circuit. Indeed, the world would be a better place if he did ignore the usual advice and give up his day job.

Nothing Else by Epoxy (Pollen Records, $16.04 from Amazon) is interesting because of who recorded it, but I can’t honestly recommend it for the musical experience it offers.

* * * * *

It’s still available through Amazon, but the price is now $17.51 for a new CD. Used copies are $2.05 and up.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


bkepoxyThe most viewed post here at Hogewash! is my review of the CD Nothing Else by Epoxy, a band fronted by Brett Kimberlin. It’s still available via Amazon.

The following is from Amazon’s product page and was apparently provided by Kimberlin.

Product Description
If you take the best of guitar based punk and garage rock, add vintage analog technology, replace the theatrics of most modern bands with the real pain of being a real U.S. Government political prisoner, stir well, and you have Epoxy’s Nothing Else — the definition of rock for the 21st century. People are saying that this album will define the standards and the sound of alternative rock for years to come. Here’s what some people are saying about this album.
About the Artist
Brett Kimberlin, guitar and vocal, wrote all the songs on Nothing Else while incarcerated as a political prisoner by right-wing elements opposed to his First Amendment rights to speech and political activity. Many prisoner rights groups came to his rescue, including Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, American Civil Liberties Union and Families Against Mandatory Minimums, and he was released after several years of suffering. A portion of each album sale will be contributed to these four organizations.

Have I ever mentioned that Brett Kimberlin was convicted of perjury?

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin tries to claim that my 21 codefendants and I did all sorts of mean things to him to ruin his business. This is from paragraph 265 of his second amended complaint in the Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness.ECF 135-265Now, it is true that I have written a negative review of his musicianship.

Review: “Nothing Else” by Epoxy (#BrettKimberlin)

Originally posted on 17 July, 2012

Back in 2002, Brett Kimberlin fronted a band named Epoxy and released a CD called Nothing Else. The story he spun promoting the album was that it contained songs that he had written while he was being held as a political prisoner in the federal prison system.

The band consisted of Brett Kimberlin on guitar and vocals, Wade Matthews on Bass, and Robbie White on Drums. The genre of the album is someplace between grunge and punk, neither of which are among my favorite musical forms.

Let me first comment on Mr. Kimberlin’s voice. I had heard his speaking voice in court, and I understand why some people refer to it as whinny. His singing voice reminds me of the silly voice that Weird Al uses on tracks such as Eat It. Mrs. Hoge, who listened through the CD with me, said, “Eddie Haskell.” On most of the tracks his voice was off key, usually flat.

Most of the songs could have been filler tracks on a generic grunge album. Some of the alienation in them seems to be more appropriate for a 17 year old, not someone 30 years older. Mr. Kimberlin was in his late 40s when the recording was made. However, three of the songs stood out. Vicegrip was actually interesting musically. Donuts had clever lyrics. It’s about lousy prison food and would probably get a nod of approval from G. Gordon Liddy.

Then there’s the last cut Keyhole. It was outstandingly bad. Mrs. Hoge and I met while we were in the music business, and during her career as a recording engineer, she recorded more gold and platinum records than I did. Her comment was, “If you’re gonna mike a guitar that close, you should use a better guitar and make sure it’s in tune. And get a better guitar player.”

While he didn’t do especially well with the acoustic guitar on Keyhole, Brett Kimberlin is actually a reasonably good guitarist. He probably couldn’t cut it in Nashville or LA, but could make a living in a minor market (such as Seattle) or playing the Holiday Inn circuit. Indeed, the world would be a better place if he did ignore the usual advice and give up his day job.

Nothing Else by Epoxy (Pollen Records, $16.04 from Amazon) is interesting because of who recorded it, but I can’t honestly recommend it for the musical experience it offers.

The CD is no longer reliably available on Amazon.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


bkepoxyYou know, there may be a limit to how low the Cabin Boy™ is willing to stoop.

So far as I can tell, he’s never played any of Brett Kimberlin’s “music” on any of his Internet radio feeds.

BTW, Amazon still offers a few new and used copies of The Dread Performer Kimberlin’s last album Epoxy: Nothing Else for as little as $1.08.

#Brett Kimberlin Sings?


bkepoxyBelieve it or not, Brett Kimberlin has had the audacity to release a CD. Epoxy: Nothing Else was released in 2002, after his second release from prison and before Justice Through Music Project got started. You can read my review of it here.

There are still a few copies available for sale as … ah … er … collector’s items.

Click here to order one through Amazon.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The most popular of the hundreds of posts about Brett Kimberlin here at Hogewash! was not about his lawfare or his Dread Piracy. It was about his musicianship. It’s time to recycle it again with an update at the end—

bkepoxyBack in 2002, Brett Kimberlin fronted a band named Epoxy and released a CD called Nothing Else. The story he spun promoting the album was that it contained songs that he had written while he was being held as a political prisoner in the federal prison system.

The band consisted of Brett Kimberlin on guitar and vocals, Wade Matthews on Bass, and Robbie White on Drums. The genre of the album is someplace between grunge and punk, neither of which are among my favorite musical forms.

Let me first comment on Mr. Kimberlin’s voice. I had heard his speaking voice in court, and I understand why some people refer to it as whinny. His singing voice reminds me of the silly voice that Weird Al uses on tracks such as Eat It. Mrs. Hoge, who listened through the CD with me, said, “Eddie Haskell.” On most of the tracks his voice was off key, usually flat.

Most of the songs could have been filler tracks on a generic grunge album. Some of the alienation in them seems to be more appropriate for a 17 year old, not someone 30 years older. Mr. Kimberlin was in his late 40s when the recording was made. However, three of the songs stood out. Vicegrip was actually interesting musically. Donuts had clever lyrics. It’s about lousy prison food and would probably get a nod of approval from G. Gordon Liddy.

Then there’s the last cut Keyhole. It was outstandingly bad. Mrs. Hoge and I met while we were in the music business, and during her career as a recording engineer, she recorded more gold and platinum records than I did. Her comment was, “If you’re gonna mike a guitar that close, you should use a better guitar and make sure it’s in tune. And get a better guitar player.”

While he didn’t do especially well with the acoustic guitar on Keyhole, Brett Kimberlin is actually a reasonably good guitarist. He probably couldn’t cut it in Nashville or LA, but could make a living in a minor market (such as Seattle) or playing the Holiday Inn circuit. Indeed, the world would be a better place if he did ignore the usual advice and give up his day job.

Nothing Else by Epoxy (Pollen Records, $16.04 from Amazon) is interesting because of who recorded it, but I can’t honestly recommend it for the musical experience it offers.

UPDATE—Aaron Walker’s review of music videos by Op-Critical, The Dread Pirate Kimberlin’s latest band, can be found here. Another Op-Critical video can be found here. On 5 December, TDPK and Op-Critical released a new music video called “Coal Miner’s Family.” It’s lurking on YouTube, and it deserves a review.

First, a decade of practice has not made any significant improvement in TDPK’s musicianship. The song is supposed to be about a family caught up in the Upper Big Branch mining disaster of 2010. The band seems to be striving to sound like an Appalachian folk group, but it doesn’t seem to have the chops to get there. Instead, it hits that level of mediocrity one hears from urban local bands at East Coast bluegrass festivals.

Second, the choice of subject matter is interesting. Op-Critical is the house band for Justice Through Music Project, an organization with the stated purpose of using “famous musicians and bands to organize, educate and activate young people about the importance of civil rights, human rights and voting.” How a mining disaster relates to that escapes me, but I notice that over the past year, JTMP has promoted anti-natural-resource-development causes such as the Tour de Frack. And now it’s taking on coal mining. And it has a major donor with possible connections to the environmentalist wackos who put Brandon Darby on a hit list. Hmmmm.

Third, listening to a Brett Kimberlin song’s treatment of the loving relationships among family members reminded me of Bruno Graz’s brilliant performance in Downfall. I don’t mean the scene that has been the subject of all those parodies. Graz’s performance showed a view of a man who was throughly evil and yet was kind to many around him. Mark Singer’s portrait of TDPK in Citizen K shows a similar, albeit less powerful, personality.