Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


This was the Cabin Boy’s™ take on copyright infringement a couple of weeks before I sued him for breaching the Settlement Agreement in the 2014 Hoge v. Schmalfeldt copyright lawsuit.Heh.

T-minus 5 days and counting—in more ways than one.

UPDATE—Tweets & Logins

2017 AUG 16 04:05:14 UTC Home Page
2017 AUG 16 04:10:23 UTC Home Page
2017 AUG 16 04:16:16 UTC Home Page
2017 AUG 16 04:17:18 UTC Home Page
2017 AUG 16 04:22:27 UTC 2014/09
2017 AUG 16 04:22:55 UTC 2014/09/page/2
2017 AUG 16 04:36:09 UTC search=prevarication+du+jour
2017 AUG 16 04:36:16 UTC search=prevarication+du+jour/page/2
2017 AUG 16 04:36:26 UTC search=prevarication+du+jour/page/3
2017 AUG 16 04:39:20 UTC search=prevarication+du+jour/page/2
2017 AUG 16 05:14:34 UTC Home Page

So two minutes after the first part of this post went up, the Cabin Boy™ took a look at Hogewash!, and then he tweeted that he wasn’t aware of what I intend to share this morning. And then he started searching “prevarication+du+jour.”

UPDATE 2—Everything is proceeding as I have foreseen.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


This came in yesterday’s mail—

During the hearing on 5 May, Judge Hecker directed The Dreadful Pro-Se Schmalfeldt to get access to a copy of the Maryland Rules and to start obeying them. Rule 1-332 prescribes how to go about applying for an accommodation from a court pursuant to the Americans With Disabilities Act. The following form must be filed with the court at least 30 days before the relevant hearing or trial.

If the Cabin Boy™ wanted an ADA accommodation during the Hoge v. Kimberlin, et al. trial, he should have submitted the proper paperwork over three weeks ago.

Everything is proceeding as I have foreseen.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The Scheduling Order for the Hoge v. Kimberlin, et al. lawsuit required that the parties provide certain information to the court not later than close of business last Friday. I filed this last Thursday.

Everything is proceeding as I have foreseen.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


A motion in limine is a motion filed before the start of a trial which seeks to limit the permissible range of evidence and testimony. I filed such a motion last Thursday in the Hoge v. Kimberlin, et al. lawsuit.

Everything is proceeding as I have foreseen.