Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Past performance is no guarantee of future results, but it’s the way to bet—

Dope Smuggling—caught, pleaded guilty

Serial Bombing—caught, convicted, paroled, sentence expires in 2030

Pro-Se Lawfare—four state defamation LOLsuits, one fraudulent default judgment, one directed verdict for defendants, two dismissals

Pro-Se Lawfare—six peace order petitions, all denied

Pro-Se Lawfare—five false criminal complaints, all dropped for lack of evidence

Pro-Se Lawfare—five federal LOLsuits, all dismissed

Music Career—neither of the bands Epoxy nor Op-Critical was successful

Election Protection 2016—Trump won

Dirt Digging 2017—got scammed by fake financial records

Election Protection 2020—as of 10:05 pm ET yesterday @ItsTime_2020 still didn’t have a single follower.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


This TKPOTD from six years ago today explains how Brett Kimberlin came to be referred to as The Dread Pirate Kimberlin.

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bot_logoThose Gentle Readers who haven’t been following the Saga of The Dread Pirate Kimberlin since last summer may not understand the piracy references. One of the organizations that raised money to help defray the legal expenses for the Virginia and federal Walker v. Kimberlin, et al. lawsuits last year was the Bloggers Defense Team. Team Kimberlin responded with a piracy themed website called the Bloggers Offense Team. I found Kimberlin’s choice of the pirate-related logo at left is interesting. Pirates aren’t semi-sympathetic, comedic characters from a Johnny Depp movie. They are criminals. Was the mask slipping?

That got me to thinking … While Brett Kimberlin’s unconstitutional peace order prohibiting Aaron Walker from blogging about him was in place, I had taken to referring to Kimberlin as Lord Voldemort (“He who must not be named”). Why not a piracy themed nickname? The Dread Pirate Kimberlin. I used it, and it stuck—not only with my readers, but other bloggers began using it occasionally too.

As fans of The Princess Bride know, The Dread Pirate Roberts is a pirate of near-mythical reputation, someone feared across the seven seas for his ruthlessness and swordfighting prowess, and who is well known for taking no prisoners. Ships immediately surrender and give up their cargos rather than be captured, a fate they imagine to be certain death.

The Dread Pirate Kimberlin is more like a legend in his own mind, a pretender who wishes to be feared for his ruthlessness and legal ability and to be known for vanquishing all comers in court. Critics, he thinks, should immediately stop telling the truth about him and give up their First Amendment rights at his command.

It turns out that The Dread Pirate Kimberlin’s legal acumen seems to be as fictional as The Dread Pirate Roberts’ existence. And no one is willing to surrender to The Dread Pirate Kimberlin.

UPDATE—From Bill Buckler’s The Privateer via Zero Hedge:

No tyrant on any level can handle derision, it deflates them utterly by reducing their stature to its proper level in a way which they cannot escape.

Yep.

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As part of the continuing ridicule of TDPK, his other activities also came under the banner of dreadness—The Dread Pro-Se/Prerormer/Protector/Protestor/Pedo/Publisher/etc.—but as he failed to pay the sanctions and court court due after his campaign of lawyer, Dread became Deadbeat.

He’s now the Deadbeat P______ Kimberlin. The Gentle Reader may insert his word of choice.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Note: This post was originally set for 12:02 am ET on the 4th, but I’m putting it up a few hours early.

Back in 2018, Brett Kimberlin filed a civil case in the Southern District of Indiana seeking to vacate some of his convictions related to the Speedway Bombings. Last Friday, Judge Tanya Walton Pratt denied his petition. Eugene Volokh has some commentary here.

I’ve included the judge’s order below. She quotes Kimberlin as having claimed:

For example, because these convictions bear on the issue of fraud, Petitioner is unable to apply for or receive government grants

Oh, really?

Isn’t the petitioner the same Brett Kimberlin who claimed that my codefendants and I in the Kimberlin v. National Bloggers Club, et al. (I) RICO Madness LOLsuit had interfered in his relationship with the State Department and its International Visitor Leadership Program? Yes, it is, but if you look very carefully at his filings in his LOLsuits against me, he never explicitly claims that either Justice Through Music Project or he was an actual State Department contractor, and when I filed a FOIA request for the any contracting details, the State Department said they had nothing on record.

Hmmmm.

Oh, one more thing … Kimberlin was represented by counsel in this case. Perhaps he’s been taught a lesson about his pro se skills.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


I’m informed that a news website covering the bustling megalopolis of Macomb, Illinois, has posted reporting by a certain GS-13 Editor about Western Illinois University’s new program Cannabis Biology and Production. (No, I won’t link to it.) Ag Students will be able to minor in cannabis production beginning with the upcoming Fall semester.

No former dope importers with midwestern distribution operations were available for comment.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


I was reviewing some of the convoluted connections that have turned up in my reporting of the past and present activities of The Dread Deadbeat Pusher Kimberlin, and Rube Goldberg came to mind. That, in turn, reminded me of this post from five years ago today.

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Here’s how Chapter 7 of Citizen K, Mark Singer’s biography of The Dread Pirate Kimberlin, begins:

A couple of weeks shy of his eighteenth birthday, in May 1972, Kimberlin was indicted and charged with having sold 2.3 grams of cocaine to someone who turned out to be a government informer. … The prosecutor who directed the grand jury that returned the indictment believed, because of what he’d been told by witnesses and federal drug agents, that Kimberlin was a substantial trafficker in cocaine, LSD, marijuana, and hashish. After Kimberlin’s arraignment, the prosecutor and agents were greatly surprised to learn that, legally, he was still a juvenile. In time, the government and Kimberlin found themselves in accord that the cocaine bust fit a pattern: The authorities saw a pattern of criminal behavior, while Kimberlin detected error and malice on the part of people supposedly enforcing the law. From either perspective, the episode could be regarded as a first domino—although the domino metaphor, inasmuch as it implies a linear progression, seems inexact. More fitting, perhaps, would be to think of it as a spring-activated lever in the Rube Goldberg contraption that delivered Kimberlin to his complicated destiny.

With apologies to Mr. Goldberg—Hand (A) pulls string (B) releasing hook (C) which starts small car (D) rolling down tracks (E), bumping monkey (G) who jumps in fright, causing hat (H) to fly off and land on the end of lever (I). The other end (J) of the lever rises, and rope (K) opens curtains (L) letting in sunlight through magnifying glass (M) focusing heat on joint (N). Cop (O) smells smoke (P) and applies handcuffs (Q).

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I couldn’t have made of the characters in Team Kimberlin if I’d tried.