Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


One of the ways that I’ve ridiculed Brett Kimberlin was to begin referring to him as The Dread Pirate Kimberlin after he put up a pirate-themed website called the Bloggers Offense Fund. As time went by, I also tagged him with other The Dread P_____ Kimberlin nicknames where P_____ might be  something likePerjurer or Pro-Se or Performer. Because he has yet to pay sanctions and court costs taxed against him, Dread has been changed to Deadbeat.

The TKPOTD for five years ago today was about The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin.

* * * * *

Here’s another silly claim that keeps reappearing in The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin’s LOLsuits.ECF 135-147

That’s from his second amended complaint in the Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness LOLsuit. It’s repeated word-for-word as paragraph 122 in the complaint in his Kimberlin v. Most of the Universe, et al. RICO Retread LOLsuit.

Ear-plugs“… in order to interfere with Plaintiff’s business relationships and his prospective advantage … as a musician.” Oh, please! Now, I will admit that I have published a review of one of his CDs and that it was unfavorable, i.e., honest. The Dread Performer Kimberlin’s lack of talent is the most significant impediment to his music career. This is not to say that I think he should abandon his attempt at a career in music. This is from my earlier review—

While he didn’t do especially well with the acoustic guitar on Keyhole, Brett Kimberlin is actually a reasonably good guitarist. He probably couldn’t cut it in Nashville or LA, but could make a living in a minor market (such as Seattle) or playing the Holiday Inn circuit. Indeed, the world would be a better place if he did ignore the usual advice and give up his day job.

‘Nuff said.

* * * * *

Yeah, Seattle might be just the place for Kimberlin.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Past performance is no guarantee of future results, but it’s the way to bet—

Dope Smuggling—caught, pleaded guilty

Serial Bombing—caught, convicted, paroled, sentence expires in 2030

Pro-Se Lawfare—four state defamation LOLsuits, one fraudulent default judgment, one directed verdict for defendants, two dismissals

Pro-Se Lawfare—six peace order petitions, all denied

Pro-Se Lawfare—five false criminal complaints, all dropped for lack of evidence

Pro-Se Lawfare—five federal LOLsuits, all dismissed

Music Career—neither of the bands Epoxy nor Op-Critical was successful

Election Protection 2016—Trump won

Dirt Digging 2017—got scammed by fake financial records

Election Protection 2020—as of 10:05 pm ET yesterday @ItsTime_2020 still didn’t have a single follower.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin has failed at a great many more things than his attempts to use lawfare to silence people who have written truthful things about him and his activities. He’s tried to make a go of using music as a tool for left-wing activism, and failed as The Dread Deadbeat Performer/Producer/Promoter/Protester Kimberlin as well. Consider this post from seven years ago today titled Justice Through Music Project, Soooper Promoters.

* * * * *

Gentle Reader, I’ll bet you didn’t know how critical having their music on the Justice Through Music Project has been for so many recording artists. What follows is from a press release dated in 2006. The subject of Craig Gillette’s PR release was the work JTMP was doing to promote a Neal Young album. I really liked this bit:

Justice Through Music has been a pioneer for the past five years in using famous bands and artists to promote civil rights. More and more artists are coming to JTM to get out their political message, including recently, Pink, Eminem, the Dixie Chicks, and many others.

JTMP’s incorporation papers show a start up date in 2003 but I suppose that Brett Kimberlin could have be operating the organization as an unincorporated entity for a couple of years. He was released from prison in 2001.

And I’m gratified to know how JTMP was so helpful to struggling acts like Pink, Eminem, the Dixie Chicks. Who knows? Maybe one day Brett Kimberlin will put that same powerful soooper promotion behind his own musical career.

* * * * *

It’s been over a year and a half since there has been any new material posted to the Justice Through Music Project website. Indeed, when Kimberlin put up a post promotion the most recent music project he’d been associated with, he published it on his Ukrainian site empr dot media.

Perhaps Justice Through Music and the band Op-Critical are now abandoned failures.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Today is the eight anniversary of the most popular post I’ve published—Review: “Nothing Else” by Epoxy (#BrettKimberlin).

* * * * *

Back in 2002, Brett Kimberlin fronted a band named Epoxy and released a CD called Nothing Else. The story he spun promoting the album was that it contained songs that he had written while he was being held as a political prisoner in the federal prison system.

The band consisted of Brett Kimberlin on guitar and vocals, Wade Matthews on Bass, and Robbie White on Drums. The genre of the album is someplace between grunge and punk, neither of which are among my favorite musical forms.

Let me first comment on Mr. Kimberlin’s voice. I had heard his speaking voice in court, and I understand why some people refer to it as whinny. His singing voice reminds me of the silly voice that Weird Al uses on tracks such as Eat It. Mrs. Hoge, who listened through the CD with me, said, “Eddie Haskell.” On most of the tracks his voice was off key, usually flat.

Most of the songs could have been filler tracks on a generic grunge album. Some of the alienation in them seems to be more appropriate for a 17 year old, not someone 30 years older. Mr. Kimberlin was in his late 40s when the recording was made. However, three of the songs stood out. Vicegrip was actually interesting musically. Donuts had clever lyrics. It’s about lousy prison food and would probably get a nod of approval from G. Gordon Liddy.

Then there’s the last cut Keyhole. It was outstandingly bad. Mrs. Hoge and I met while we were in the music business, and during her career as a recording engineer, she recorded more gold and platinum records than I did. Her comment was, “If you’re gonna mike a guitar that close, you should use a better guitar and make sure it’s in tune. And get a better guitar player.”

While he didn’t do especially well with the acoustic guitar on Keyhole, Brett Kimberlin is actually a reasonably good guitarist. He probably couldn’t cut it in Nashville or LA, but could make a living in a minor market (such as Seattle) or playing the Holiday Inn circuit. Indeed, the world would be a better place if he did ignore the usual advice and give up his day job.

Nothing Else by Epoxy (Pollen Records, $16.04 from Amazon) is interesting because of who recorded it, but I can’t honestly recommend it for the musical experience it offers.

* * * * *

There’s good news, and there’s bad news. First, the bad news: Nothing Else is still available at Amazon. Now, the good news: As of 9 pm ET last night, the price had dropped to $5.64.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Last week, this site had a post about a music video which employed Brett Kimberlin as one of its producers and as rhythm guitar player. It turns out that Hogewash! in not the only website to take notice. This was published at empr dot media on 3 June.The Gentle Reader may remember that Protect Our Elections/EMPR Inc. is The Dread Deadbeat Performer/Protector Kimberlin’s organization which was formerly known as Velvet Revolution US. The IRS has revoked its 501(c)(4) not-for-profit status.

Note: In the past, I have avoided referring to Miss Kimberlin by name when she was a part the narrative in a post because she was a minor child. However, she is now 21 and promoting herself as a performer. I now feel free to write about her to the extent that she makes herself a public person. She has had a rough start in life as a child. I wish her well and hope that she finds a happy, rewarding, and productive future as an adult.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


A commenter to yesterday’s TKPOTD asks if Lobotomy, the song in the music video referenced in the post, is a recycled Op-Critical tune. I believe so. Here’s a song list from op-critical dot com, the website for what used to be the house band for The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s not-for-profit Justice Through Music Project. Lobotomy is one of the titles listed.That website doesn’t appear to have had any maintenance for several years. All of the links are broken.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


I stumbled upon a link to a music video posted on YouTube last week that had the following information included in the credits—

I’ll make a couple of comments.

First, this explains what The Dread Deadbeat Protector Kimberlin has been doing instead of focusing on his Protect Our Elections/EMRP Inc. not-for-profit.

Second, I once remarked that while I would normally advise someone with The Dread Deadbeat Performer musical talent not to give up his day job, I was willing to make an exception in Kimberlin’s case. I’ll stand by that exception for Kimberlin.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Anyone who has had the misfortune of listening to one of Brett Kimberlin’s music videos will understand why it is so easy to make fun of them. The TKPOTD from five years ago today did just that.

* * * * *

One of The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin’s complaints in his Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness is that telling the truth about him has hurt his efforts in the music business. OTOH, it has come to my attention that the publicity has suggested another possible market for his music videos.MST3K_BK

* * * * *

I suppose another possible use for The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s music would be in Room 101.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin included me as a defendant in four of the many LOLsuits he filed over the past few years. The third suit that included me was his RICO Retread LOLsuit which tried to revive the state law claims from his first RICO case. The TKPOTD from four years ago was one of the early reports on the process of defeating that third lawsuit.

* * * * *

During the motions hearing last week in the Kimberlin v. Most of the Universe, et al. RICO Retread LOLsuit, Judge Mason was well prepared. He said this to The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin while dealing with my motion to dismiss for improper venue.

THE COURT: And I’ve looked through your 52-page complaint a couple of times and again just this morning before coming out on the bench because I wanted to make sure that I understood precisely what is being alleged here.

The judge then proceeded to explain to TDPK some of the deficiencies in his pleading concerning me. I’d share some of that with you, but I don’t want to refresh the midget’s memory. TDPK has this to say to the judge:

MR. KIMBERLIN: I wanted to limit this case to the swatting. That’s what I’ve done. You know, if I have to refile against Mr. Hoge in Carroll County or in this county, you know, it would be another massive lawsuit. I would like to keep him in this case, whether through an amendment or whatever and let a jury decide, you know, what he’s done with regard to the swatting. You know, part of what the whole Everybody Blog About Brett Kimberlin Day was to portray me as a criminal swatter to silence conservative bloggers, you know, which was not the case. I have nothing at all to do with any swattings at all.

movie popcornAnother massive LOLsuit? Really? I suppose that means that TDPK has not yet figured out that there are some people who aren’t soft targets for lawfare. If he has learned anything about tangling with me, he’ll wise up and fail to amend his LOLsuit by the 18th, or, if he really comes to his senses, he’ll dismiss the entire LOLsuit for all the remaining defendants.

I wouldn’t bet on his acting wisely, so the Gentle Reader may want to lay in a good stock of popcorn. Here’s a deal from Amazon.

Stay tuned.

* * * * *

The Gentle Readers will note that I often suggest that they stay tuned. I’d offer the same suggestion to The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s guitar, but …

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Today is the fifth anniversary of the start of the Kimberlin v. Walker, et al. trial, the first of four LOLsuits the Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin lost against me. My publication of the graphic shown in the TKPOTD from six years ago today was part of the bases for his claim that I had defamed him.

* * * * *

DredPedoKmbrlnHere’s how Brett Kimberlin described his musical ambitions to his biographer Mark Singer as Kimberlin was being release from prison in 1994 (Citizen K, p. 354).

I’m doing this for the money. I’m doing it for fun and creativity too, but it’s mainly for the money. It’s like vengeance. I can go out there and say things and reach a huge audience, and it’s a kind of revenge on all the people who hate me. Can you imagine if I have a number-one hit and I’m all over the radio—every time [former U. S. Attorney] Jack Thar turns on the radio, there’s Brett Kimberlin? Success is the best revenge. These people who wished me ill, who lied about me, made up these stories, turned me into this monster, will just turn green with envy. Every quote from Thar over the years has been “God! How can you believe this guy!” All this publicity I’ve gotten will now be working for me. My lyrics are very potent, and they’ll touch a lot of people. I see myself as being in the Phil Collins mold more than, say, in the Michael Jackson mold. I can’t be fake that way. I have to be real.

Uh, huh.

It may be that more and more people are beginning to see a certain similarity to Michael Jackson after all.

* * * * *

TDPK lost that LOLsuit because he presented no evidence (“Not one scintilla,” was the phrase Judge Johnson used.) that any thing I had said or written about him was false.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


One of the most persistent wastes of Internet bandwidth inflicted on the Universe by Team Kimberlin is the op-critical dot com website that allegedly promotes The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s band Op-Critical. Seven years ago, I posted #BrettKimberlin and Op-Critical which noted … oh, I’ll let it speak for itself.

* * * * *

Tuesday night, I posted a review of the CD released by Brett Kimberlin’s previous band Epoxy. His most recent music group is called Op-Critical. The band has a website, a rather stale one that doesn’t appear to have been updated for several years.

While nosing about the site, I found these lyrics as part of a song called Fork

I am losing all control and I just don’t know what to do …

Yep, we are controlling transmission. If we wish to make it louder, we will bring up the volume. If we wish to make it softer, we will tune it to a whisper. We will control the horizontal. We will control the vertical. We can roll the image, make it flutter. We can change the focus to a soft blur or sharpen it to crystal clarity.

You have gone past the outer limit of what you might have been able to control, but the truth will bring clarity. But clarity may not be your friend.

* * * * *

Yep. The result of The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberli’s lawfare campaign of brass knuckles reputation management was that he lost control of his public persona.

Oh, and as for the op-critical dot com website, it doesn’t seem to have been updated since my post was published in 2012. Here’s a snapshot of it from yesterday evening.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


It’s the seventh anniversary of the post that’s had the most hits here at Hogewash!Review: “Nothing Else” by Epoxy (#BrettKimberlin).

* * * * *

Back in 2002, Brett Kimberlin fronted a band named Epoxy and released a CD called Nothing Else. The story he spun promoting the album was that it contained songs that he had written while he was being held as a political prisoner in the federal prison system.

The band consisted of Brett Kimberlin on guitar and vocals, Wade Matthews on Bass, and Robbie White on Drums. The genre of the album is someplace between grunge and punk, neither of which are among my favorite musical forms.

Let me first comment on Mr. Kimberlin’s voice. I had heard his speaking voice in court, and I understand why some people refer to it as whinny. His singing voice reminds me of the silly voice that Weird Al uses on tracks such as Eat It. Mrs. Hoge, who listened through the CD with me, said, “Eddie Haskell.” On most of the tracks his voice was off key, usually flat.

Most of the songs could have been filler tracks on a generic grunge album. Some of the alienation in them seems to be more appropriate for a 17 year old, not someone 30 years older. Mr. Kimberlin was in his late 40s when the recording was made. However, three of the songs stood out. Vicegrip was actually interesting musically. Donuts had clever lyrics. It’s about lousy prison food and would probably get a nod of approval from G. Gordon Liddy.

Then there’s the last cut Keyhole. It was outstandingly bad. Mrs. Hoge and I met while we were in the music business, and during her career as a recording engineer, she recorded more gold and platinum records than I did. Her comment was, “If you’re gonna mike a guitar that close, you should use a better guitar and make sure it’s in tune. And get a better guitar player.”

While he didn’t do especially well with the acoustic guitar on Keyhole, Brett Kimberlin is actually a reasonably good guitarist. He probably couldn’t cut it in Nashville or LA, but could make a living in a minor market (such as Seattle) or playing the Holiday Inn circuit. Indeed, the world would be a better place if he did ignore the usual advice and give up his day job.

Nothing Else by Epoxy (Pollen Records, $16.04 from Amazon) is interesting because of who recorded it, but I can’t honestly recommend it for the musical experience it offers.

* * * * *

This exchange from a somewhat delayed comment is a favorite of mine—

In one of his multitude of LOLsuits, The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin complained that the reporting here at Hogewash! was interfering with his business as a musician and composer. Certainly, the review above could be characterized as adverse. OTOH, the Gentle Reader can check out the Op-Critical and Justice Through Music video still lurking on YouTube and form his own opinion concerning TDPK’s talent and commercial viability as a musician.

In another of his LOLsuits, The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin claimed that part of his job description at Justice Through Music Project included filing lawsuits “seeking redress in federal court for violations of his civil and statutory rights.” Considering his track record, it may be that his day job has given up on him.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


This appeared in my Twitter Notifications yesterday—I went over to MySpace (yes, it’s still on the web) and checked out the Op-Critical (Brett’s most recent band) songs posted there. While I was able to see the web pages for them, I couldn’t get any of them to play. All were posted during the 2003 to 2012 period supposed to be affected.

BTW, the times played listed for every one other of the songs I checked were all the same. Karma seems to be catching up with The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Lying liars gotta lie, and that explains the bulk of the nonsense that The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin has put out in support of his lawfare. The TDPOTD from four years ago today cataloged this set of lies.

* * * * *

Here’s an interesting claim from one of Exhibit 7 of The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin’s omnibus opposition to the motions to dismiss his Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness. ECF 231 EX7-9The SAC (that’s the second amended complaint) alleges that the mythical RICO enterprise began picking on Brett in August, 2010, although it doesn’t mention any specific acts occurring until October. So what sort of “social causes” was The Dread Performer Kimberlin “highlighting” before August, 2010? Well, in March of that year he was promoting teenage love with werewolves.Op-Crit Tweets

As for TDPK’s claim that he was unable to produce songs and videos after August, 2010, Freakin Frackin was posted to YouTube on 12 January, 2011; Occupy Music Video: Anonymous was posted to YouTube on 17 June, 2011; Coal Miner’s Family was posted to YoutTube on 5 December, 2012; and that’s not a complete list of TDPK’s work published online since 2010.

The most amazing things about Brett’s lying is how clumsy he is with it. You’d think that after all those years of practice, … oh, never mind.

* * * * *

The Twilight Angel video is still up on YouTube. I don’t recommend listening to it unless you have a large quantity of industrial-strength weapons-grade ear bleach available.

The Gentle Reader who is familiar with The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s background may draw his own conclusions about why Op-Critical might put out a music video related to a movie targeted at underage girls.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Brett Kimberlin’s 501(c)3 not-for-profit, Justice Through Music Project, and his 501(4), VelvetRevoliution dot US Protect Our Elections/EMPR Inc., are among the least transparent “charities” when it come to their finances. The following is part of a post called Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin Sells DVDs that ran six years ago today. The reference to discovery relates to the first round of lawsuits between the Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin and Aaron Walker.

* * * * *

Among the information sought from TDPK in the discovery process of the Virginia Walker v. Kimberlin, et al. civil suit are the financial records of his 501(c)(3), Justice Through Music Project, and his 501(c)(4), Velvet Revolution US.

TDPK asserted that he is immune from discovery, citing the Fifth Amendment among other reasons. Judge Potter’s response boils down to No, now get on with answering the questions put to you and produce the documents called for.

What is it about JTMP’s books, for instance, that TDPK wants to keep hidden? Does he have some trade secret for raising money for his “charities”? Or could it be that he really has a reasonable apprehension of criminal liability based on what those records would reveal?

Consider this: The IRS Form 990s filed by JTMP for 2005 through 2008 show revenue of $1,364,443 and total expenditures of $610,460 for “Printing and publication.” The JTMP website says that they produce DVDs and that they give ten away for each one that they sell.

However, none of the Form 990s for 2005 through 2008 show any income for the sale of DVDs or anything else. Neither does the Form 990 for 2010. Where are the records of the sales?

For that matter, are there any records to audit? JTMP has chronically asked for extensions of time to file with the IRS because “Taxpayer needs more time to gather records.” Really? Is the operation that lax? After all, the Executive Director is a lawyer and the returns have been prepared by an accountant.

* * * * *

I’ve never seen one of the Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s JTMP DVDs. I’m not really sure they ever existed. I’d like to get may hands on one, so I’m offering a $100 credit for merchandise at The Hogewash Store to the first person who sends me a Rock Your Rights DVD that can be authenticated.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Back in 2012, a legal fund called the Bloggers Defense Fund was set up to support Aaron Walker in his court cases involving Brett Kimberlin. Kimberlin responded by setting up the Bloggers Offense Fund with a pirate-themed website. It’s because of that fund and website that he became laughingly referred to as The Dread Pirate Kimberlin. This post from six years ago today contrasted Kimberlin with Dread Pirate Roberts.

* * * * *

The Dread Pirate Roberts, so the story goes, is a pirate of near-mythical reputation, someone feared across the seven seas for his ruthlessness and swordfighting prowess, and who is well known for taking no prisoners. Ships immediately surrender and give up their cargos rather than be captured, a fate they imagine to be certain death.

The Dread Pirate Kimberlin is more like a legend in his own mind, a pretender who wishes to be feared for his ruthlessness and legal ability and to be known for vanquishing all comers in court. Critics, he thinks, should immediately stop telling the truth about him and give up their First Amendment rights at his command.

It turns out that Dread Pirate Kimberlin’s legal acumen seems to be as fictional as Dread Pirate Roberts’ existence. And no one will surrender to Dread Pirate Kimberlin.

* * * * *

And no defendant loses to The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin. And no one listens to The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin, And no one reads the websites fo the Dread Deadbeat Publisher Kimberlin. And no one …

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


From time to time, I repost information about how Brett Kimberlin came to be known as The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin. This is what I posted on the subject four years ago today.

* * * * *

bot_logoSome of the newer followers of The Saga of The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin may wonder why he is called that. The nickname descends from an earlier one—The Dread Pirate Kimberlin. That came about after he put up a spectacularly unsuccessful pirate-theme fundraising website called Bloggers Offense Team. I found Kimberlin’s choice of the pirate-related logo at left is interesting. Pirates aren’t semi-sympathetic, comedic characters from a Johnny Depp movie. They are criminals. Was the mask slipping?

That got me to thinking … While Brett Kimberlin’s unconstitutional peace order prohibiting Aaron Walker from blogging about him was in place, I had taken to referring to Kimberlin as Lord Voldemort (“He who must not be named”). Why not a piracy themed nickname? The Dread Pirate Kimberlin. I used it, and it stuck—not only with my readers, but other bloggers began using it occasionally too.

As fans of The Princess Bride know, The Dread Pirate Roberts is a pirate of near-mythical reputation, someone feared across the seven seas for his ruthlessness and swordfighting prowess and who is well known for taking no prisoners. Ships immediately surrender and give up their cargos rather than be captured, a fate they imagine to be certain death.

TDPKThe Dread Pirate Kimberlin is more like a legend in his own mind, a pretender who wishes to be feared for his ruthlessness and legal ability and to be known for vanquishing all comers in court. Critics, he thinks, should immediately stop telling the truth about him and give up their First Amendment rights at his command.

It turns out that The Dread Pirate Kimberlin’s legal acumen seems to be as fictional as The Dread Pirate Roberts’ existence. And no one is willing to surrender to The Dread Pirate Kimberlin.

* * * * *

Kimberlin’s repeated failure to pay the judgments and sanctions he owes have led to Dread being struck through and replaced with Deadbeat. His failures at almost everything he’s tried have led to other words being used in place of Pirate and Pro-Se. As a musician, he’s The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin. Given his string of unread websites, he’s The Dread Deadbeat Publisher Kimberlin. As a result of all the false narratives he’s tired to spin against his enemies, he’s The Dread Deadbeat Prevaricator Kimberlin. And so it goes.

Failing failures gotta fail.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


One common characteristic among the members of Team Kimberlin is a lack of musical talent. Rather than admit his inadequacy, The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin has tried to sue some of us who have commented on his musicianship. The TKPOTD from four years ago today dealt with his claim in his RICO Madness LOLsuit that my codefendants and I had tried to ruin his career.

* * * * *

The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin tries to claim that my 21 codefendants and I did all sorts of mean things to him to ruin his business. This is from paragraph 265 of his second amended complaint in the Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness.ECF 135-265Now, it is true that I have written a negative review of his musicianship.

Review: “Nothing Else” by Epoxy (#BrettKimberlin)

Originally posted on 17 July, 2012

Back in 2002, Brett Kimberlin fronted a band named Epoxy and released a CD called Nothing Else. The story he spun promoting the album was that it contained songs that he had written while he was being held as a political prisoner in the federal prison system.

The band consisted of Brett Kimberlin on guitar and vocals, Wade Matthews on Bass, and Robbie White on Drums. The genre of the album is someplace between grunge and punk, neither of which are among my favorite musical forms.

Let me first comment on Mr. Kimberlin’s voice. I had heard his speaking voice in court, and I understand why some people refer to it as whinny. His singing voice reminds me of the silly voice that Weird Al uses on tracks such as Eat It. Mrs. Hoge, who listened through the CD with me, said, “Eddie Haskell.” On most of the tracks his voice was off key, usually flat.

Most of the songs could have been filler tracks on a generic grunge album. Some of the alienation in them seems to be more appropriate for a 17 year old, not someone 30 years older. Mr. Kimberlin was in his late 40s when the recording was made. However, three of the songs stood out. Vicegrip was actually interesting musically. Donuts had clever lyrics. It’s about lousy prison food and would probably get a nod of approval from G. Gordon Liddy.

Then there’s the last cut Keyhole. It was outstandingly bad. Mrs. Hoge and I met while we were in the music business, and during her career as a recording engineer, she recorded more gold and platinum records than I did. Her comment was, “If you’re gonna mike a guitar that close, you should use a better guitar and make sure it’s in tune. And get a better guitar player.”

While he didn’t do especially well with the acoustic guitar on Keyhole, Brett Kimberlin is actually a reasonably good guitarist. He probably couldn’t cut it in Nashville or LA, but could make a living in a minor market (such as Seattle) or playing the Holiday Inn circuit. Indeed, the world would be a better place if he did ignore the usual advice and give up his day job.

Nothing Else by Epoxy (Pollen Records, $16.04 from Amazon) is interesting because of who recorded it, but I can’t honestly recommend it for the musical experience it offers.

The CD is no longer reliably available on Amazon

.* * * * *

The original publication of that review resulted in Hogewash!‘s first Instalanche. There were probably more hits on that review over the next couple of days than on the jtmp dot org website for the next year.

The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin’s plan for brass knuckles reputation management wasn’t any better than his music.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Failing musicianship is a common characteristic among many members of Team Kimberlin. Very Ordinary Seaman Ferguson has never had much success peddling his sub-aetha schtick. Cabin Boy Bill Schmalfeldt’s song parodies are usually the low point of his podcast demo du jour. And, as the TKPOTD from four years ago today noted, The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s lack of talent has stunted his musical ambitions.

* * * * *

Brett Kimberlin has wanted a successful music career for decades. The Gentle Reader can find his music videos lurking on YouTube and see why success has eluded him. On page 354 of Citizen K: The Deeply Weird American Journey of Brett Kimberlin, Mark Singer quotes Brett Kimberlin as saying:

My lyrics are very potent, and they’ll touch a lot of people. I see myself as being in the Phil Collins mold more than, say, in the Michael Jackson mold. I can’t be fake that way. I have to be real.

Certainly, Kimberlin does not rise to Michael Jackson’s stature …

* * * * *

Also, none of them seem to have had much success with a day job either.

Hmmmm.

 

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Just before he began his most recent campaign of lawfare, The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin warned Patterico that he had filed “over a hundred lawsuits,” and that one more would be a problem for him. He was wrong that further lawsuits wouldn’t be a problem—he sued the wrong folks. But it is true that he had filed lots of LOLsuits, most of them frivolous, and almost all of them losers. The TKPOTD from five years ago today dealt with one of the silliest.

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In November, 1997, Brett Kimberlin filed a complaint because the Bureau of Prisons would not allow him to play music on an electric guitar. An amendment in the Budget Act had banned the use of electric and electronic instruments in prisons except during worship services. The U. S. District Court in D. C. decided his case (in favor of the BOP) in late May, 2001, just a couple of weeks before his second release. The following is from the court’s decision [Kimberlin and Rice v. U. S. Department of Justice and Bureau of Prisons, 318 F.3d 228 (2003)]:

Plaintiffs assert that an acoustic guitar is not equivalent to an electric guitar. According to plaintiff Kimberlin, it is impossible for him to play his songs on an acoustic guitar. He is not able to make long, sustained notes. Also, he cannot perform a technique called “vibrato” because the strings on an acoustic guitar will not bend or sustain like those on an electric guitar.

Notwithstanding, BOP has not prohibited all musical expression, only the use of electrical instruments. An active music program and other informal means of musical expression still exist. Plaintiffs contend that an electric guitar is essential to their musical expression. Thus, they argue, banning this instrument is an absolute ban on their musical expression. Plaintiffs are incorrect in asserting that music created by an electric instrument is a distinct expression protected by the First Amendment. This Court has not found, and plaintiffs do not cite, any cases addressing this proposition. Accordingly, the issue is whether BOP’s policy impermissibly limits a prisoner’s First Amendment right to express himself through music by banning one of several mediums by which a prisoner can musically express himself.

Plaintiffs argue that to require them to express themselves musically on an acoustic instrument would be akin to requiring rap musicians to sing ballads, or Muslim prisoners to attend Catholic religious services. Plaintiffs insist that they cannot perform their music on acoustic instruments.

Plaintiffs are free to express themselves musically using other instruments, such as an acoustic guitar. Like the prisoners in Amatel, plaintiffs are only limited, not deprived. They can perform music written for an electric guitar on an acoustic guitar. This is not the same as expression on an electric instrument, but it is certainly an alternate to such expression. Moreover, plaintiff Kimberlin has stated that he has written a song which he can hear in his mind, but cannot perform, edit, polish, or get feedback. He may discuss the notes, lyrics, and ideas with others as a means of expressing himself through his music and getting feedback. Again, this is not the same as playing the electric guitar, but it is an alternate that allows him to express himself musically.

Well, like a group of real musicians once said:

No, you can’t always get what you want,
But if you try sometime, you just might find
You get what you need.

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Although the issue was never raised, another reason to prevent TDPK from having an electric guitar while in prison would be to forestall Eighth Amendment claims from other prisoners.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


As part of a continuing search to find a relevant cause that would motivate donors, Justice Through Music Project got involved with the anti-fracking movement. the TKPOTD from five years ago today dealt with part of that effort.

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Justice Through Music Project has posted another music video on YouTube. It’s a sorta/kinda cover of John Prine’s Paradise. It’s an anti-natural-resource-extraction propaganda piece aimed at the Keystone XL pipeline. In fact, the band calls themselves the Keystone Pipeline Kops instead of Op-Critical.

Now, if I were Brett Kimberlin, I would avoid having anything to do with any song from John Prine’s first album lest I remind listeners of other songs from that album that might have unfortunate references to drug dealing, porn, etc.

Sam Stone: “There’s a hole in daddy’s arm where all the money goes.”

Your Flag Decal Won’t Get You Into Heaven Anymore: “While digesting Reader’s Digest in the back of a dirty book store …”

Illegal Smile: “Won’t you please tell the man I didn’t kill anyone …”

Just sayin’ …

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The failure of The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s music career sounds like a real Dear Abby.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


One of the claims that The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin has made in his LOLsuits is that all of us bloggers writing truthful things about him have hurt his ability to write and produce his songs and music videos. As this post from five years ago demonstrates, some folks might view a reduction in The Dread Deadbeat Performers output to be a good thing.

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Brett Kimberlin fancies himself a great musician. (H/T, Kimberlin Unmaksked)

The term “delusions of adequacy” comes to mind.

UPDATE—Here’s a statement made by a Justice Through Music Project spokesman (not Brett Kimberlin) about the time this video was released:

We want videos that have staying power, that make a cultural statement, and that have an emotional component to them so that they will influence youth. Politicians spend hundreds of millions if not billions of dollars on ads to influence middle class America, and they basically ignore young people totally; and we feel like the music videos are like the cultural statements or the ads for young people, so we hope to get them involved and influence them to make the right decision in November.

Uh, huh.

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Kimberlin and Op-Critical really ought to do a cover of I Fought the Law (And the Law Won).