Coming Attractions


So the Democrats say that they’ll be using their new control of House committees to do some investigating. We’ll see how that works out. Meanwhile, Conrad Black makes this observation over at the National Post

Now that the president has fired the attorney general and can confirm a replacement who is not emasculated on Russian matters, the administration can proceed to the indictment of all leading members of the Clinton campaign and the Obama justice department who appear to have incriminated themselves by lying to Congress or the FISA Court, including Hillary Clinton, Loretta Lynch, and agency heads John Brennan, James Clapper, and James Comey. This may happen anyway, but it certainly will if the Waters-Nadler-Schiff faction is unleashed. Trump has been put to extreme inconvenience by these spurious investigations and he can, if he wishes, exact a terrible vengeance. His moderation should not be presumed.

I’d better buy some more popcorn futures.

Congress v. The Courts


While considering my first cup of coffee this morning, I was scrolling through teh Twitterz and found this—
—which seems to be a neat summation of the real constitutional “crisis” being played out in this week’s SCOTUS nomination hearings: Congress has been failing to do its job writing legislation for more than a century.

One obvious problem is the deferral of too much of the regulatory process to executive branch agencies such as the FCC or the EPA. Another is the lack of Congressional pushback when the courts have engaged in legislation from the bench.

If Senator Hirono is so concerned about the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade, she should introduce legislation to remove the Court’s authority to consider abortion cases. Congress has that power under Art. III, Sec. 2 of the Constitution. Of course, the fallout from the debate over such a bill might have disastrous consequences for elected officials who could lose their jobs at the next election, so it’s understandable that she might prefer to leave such questions the responsibility of government employees with better job security. Even if they might vote the wrong way. Some things aren’t worth risking your job.

Trump Obeys Constitution—Democrats Hardest Hit


The Constitution specifically forbids the spending of any money from the Treasury of the United States unless the expenditure is authorized by a law passed by Congress. Congress has never authorized any Obamacare subsides, and a federal court has ruled them unconstitutional. President Trump has ordered that no further unconstitutional payments be made. The whining by the Democrats in Congress and with media bylines is interesting to watch.

The President sure is unpredictable. Why, the next thing you know, the President might do something like start acting as if treaties have to be ratified by the Senate.

Do Something!


One of the most offensive things that I’ve heard from certain quarters on the Left is that we Conservatives who say that we pray for the victims of mass shootings should “do something” instead. As someone who believes in the efficacy of prayer, I believe that praying is doing something.

Moreover, the Left also generally implies that we Conservative don’t want legislative action taken to make mass shootings or gun violence less likely, and that’s simply not true. The rejection of flawed proposals from the Left by thoughtful Conservatives is not a call to do nothing. Rather, we propose solutions which involve moving away from failed policies and repealing ineffective (or actually harmful) laws.

For example, the elimination of gun-free zones allows people to better defend themselves. A mass shooting was nipped in the bud at a church near Nashville a few days ago by a concealed carry permit holder who resisted the shooter.

So it is time to do something. Let those of us who pray do so, and let’s all of us demand that Congress repeal and replace federal laws and regulations that cannot be shown to have improved public safety and demand that Congress exercise its authority under the Fourteenth Amendment to preempt state laws which deprive citizens of their rights under the Second Amendment.

Would You Like Some Cheese With That Whine


Politico has a post up about how some bureaucrats and former bureaucrats are upset with Congress reviewing and repealing regulations under the Congressional Review Act of 1996. Toward the end of the post it has a quote from one of the regulators that shows his upside-down view of the constitution.

“I believe there’s a good chance that, in a legal challenge, that a court will overturn Congress’ actions here as an unconstitutional usurpation of the executive branch’s powers,” he said.

Uh, no. The ability of the bureaucrats to regulate does not generally flow from the President’s powers under Article II. It’s is generally derived from Congress delegating it’s Article I powers to the Executive Branch. What Congress can delegate, it can take back.