An Unintended Consequence


Hillary Clinton carried Colorado during the 2016 election, but when the state’s electors met to vote, one of them refused to vote for her. The Colorado Secretary of State replaced that elector with one who would vote for Clinton. The original elector sued the Secretary of State, claiming that his removal was illegal and that the State could not bind him to vote in a particular way. Yesterday, the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled in the elector’s favor.

One consequence of a state’s inability to bind electors to vote a particular way is that the states who are members of the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact cannot legally require their electors to cast their votes in any particular way.

The Democrats’ plan to sabotage the Electoral College may have been stopped by the action of a Democrat elector.

Don’t Get Cocky, Kid


The Denver Post reports that Republican voters seem to be getting their ballots in faster that Democrats. Colorado has gone to 100 % mail-in ballots.

As of Wednesday, the most recent day the Colorado secretary of state’s office released ballot return data, 145,824 Republican voters had mailed back their ballots while 105,401 Democrats had done the same. More than 77,000 unaffiliated voters had also returned their completed ballots.

If that trend continues, the Republican vote may exceed the margin of theft.

In Other Election News …


Six of the eleven Colorado counties that had secession referenda on their ballots yesterday voted in favor of leaving the state.Colorado SuccessionMichael Tomasky wrote about the Colorado secession movement yesterday over at The Daily Beast. He sees the referenda as a result of the “culture-ization” of politics,

the trumping of shared culture over shared political traditions and agreements that go back generations. We’ve seen it around the world. Czeckoslovakia splitting in two. Yugoslavia splitting in five.

He also points to the desire of some who live in Western Maryland to have done with the blue state follies emanating from Annapolis.

He almost gets it right.

Back in the ’70s, I spent a great deal of time in Colorado, mostly around Colorado Springs. On common theme I heard in conversation among the Colorado natives was a complaint about “Californicartion.” By that they meant the shift in the state’s culture caused by refugees from urban areas moving into the state. Many were coming to get away from the problems of big cities, but they were not assimilating into Colorado’s culture. They were expecting the natives to change and be like them.

It’s not surprising to me that the secession movement is mostly out on the Front Range, the area east of the Rockies. That’s agricultural land that hasn’t attracted out-of-state folks to same extent as Denver and the ski country.

Tomasky is correct in seeing the cultural divides that are opening up between mostly urban and mostly rural areas in some states. If the kulturkampf is decided strictly at the ballot box, then I suspect the secessionist areas will be forced into remaining inside the existing state borders, at least as long as the blue states can remain financially solvent.