Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Yesterday’s TKPOTD alluded to the connections that both Joe Biden and Brett Kimberlin have to Ukrainian interests. One of Kimberlin’s not-for-profits is Protect Our Elections/EMPR Inc. EMPR is EuroMaidan Public Relations, and empr dot media is an English-lanugauge Ukrainian news site. Kimberlin also has ties to the Chalupa sisters, Alexandra Chalupa appears to have been involved in some of the Democrats’ shenanigans related to Ukraine during the  2016 election, and Kimberlin was involved in at least one of the attempts to dig up false documents for use against the Trump administration in 2017.

The have been other uses of Kimberlin in the #I’mWithJoe meme. For example, …If the Gentle Reader doesn’t know the backstory related to that tweet, this post may help.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Seven years ago today, I published this post title Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin, Braggart. The quote from Citizen K describes Mark Singer’s take on what drives Kimberlin to spin his false narratives.

* * * * *

Mark Singer devotes Chapter 35 of Citizen K to the differences between TDPK’s tall tales and reality. He describes how TDPK told of a raid during which the narcs announced themselves by yelling, “Open up! Open up! DEA!” The raid in question occurred before the DEA was formed. Back then, the federal narcs were the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.

Mr. Singer continues:

There were similar stories whose only corroborating witnesses were dead or otherwise unavailable—Kimberlin’s tale, for instance, of being robbed by a junkie in Bloomington when he was sixteen years old. The specifics of that one never struck me as especially plausible—a hundred pound kid wrestling a .38-caliber gun from a junkie—but it was virtually impossible to prove it a fabrication. What mattered about such vignettes was their portrayal of a fearless, at times even heroic, protagonist. The tale-teller was a short fellow who needed to be looked up to, who consistently sought relationships with females much younger than himself, who could boast to an eighteen-year-old woman he’d just met on the bus that he was “one of the strongest men in the world.”

The phrase a legend in his own mind seems appropriate.

* * * * *

Yep. Singer nailed it.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


I’ve been a defendant in two RICO LOLsuits filed by The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin. The TKPOTD for three years ago today, dealt with his first RICO suit which was filed almost three decades before he sued me.

* * * * *

The two RICO LOLsuits that The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin has filed against me were not his first venture into RICO madness. This is from the section in Mark Singer’s book Citizen K about TDPK in-prison business selling porn.

In January 1987, in federal court in Madison, Wisconsin, Kimberlin sued Crest Paragon Productions, alleging false advertising, breach of contract, mail fraud, conspiracy, and violations of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO). According to the complaint, instead of thirty magazines and sixteen books Kimberlin expected when he responded to a back-of-the-book advertisement placed by Crest Paragon, he was sent “fifteen pamphlets and three paperback books of low quality.” He described this material to me as “real old four-by-six black-and-white pictures that looked like they were from the 1960s and came from England.” The tepid paperbacks had titles like Making a Score and Coed Cohabitation. When Kimberlin wrote a letter demanding the material he had originally ordered, the defendant had the temerity to offer instead “sexual aids,” including, Kimberlin noted, “a live-size inflatable doll, dildos, and a vibrating plastic vagina.”

Though Kimberlin felt conflicted because “I could have made a fortune on that stuff inside prison if it wasn’t contraband,” mainly he felt compelled to sue. He asked for compensatory and punitive damages totaling $150,000. After “a fucking Reagan appointee” dismissed the suit on procedural grounds, Brett appealed to the Seventh Circuit but was told he’d have to pay an additional filing fee. “I decided at that point I’d spent enough on this,” he said. “So I just blew if off.”

—p. 203

So far, it looks like he’ll be three for three.

* * * * *

TDPK actually went four for four.

Most of the Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness LOLsuit had been dismissed for failure to state a claim when that TKPOTD was written. The remaining count became the Kimberlin v. Frey RICO Remnant LOLsuit. Kimberlin lost that case at summary judgment, and he lost all the related appeals.

The Kimberlin v. Team Themis RICO 2: Electric Boogaloo LOLsuit was still pending three years ago. Kimberlin lost that and the related appeal as well.

A year and a day after the post was published, TDPK filed another RICO suit, Kimberlin v. Breitbart Holdings, et al. That suit was dismissed because his complaint violated the court’s protection order in the Frey case. Kimberlin appealed and lost that appeal also.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


It seems that even people who want to believe Brett Kimberlin eventually figure out that he’s a liar. This post from six years ago today titled Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin, Storyteller was taken from Kimberlin’s authorized biography.

* * * * *

From listening to him in court, reading his court filings, and viewing his web sites, it seems to me that TDPK is making stuff up as he goes along. Mark Singer came to a similar conclusion in his book Citizen K. The following is from a section that begins at the bottom of page 335.

I came to this conclusion:

The Quayle story was Kimberlin’s most successful creation, the invention that propelled him further than any other. Someone he knew, but not Kimberlin himself, had either sold or claimed to have sold pot to Quayle—and he appropriated this for himself. …

I spent four years asking questions about Kimberlin, and along the way I never met a soul who could offer genuine corroboration of the fable that brought his to my attention in the first place.

Brett Kimberlin is a storyteller, a teller of tall tales, but not a very good one. He sometimes has trouble remembering what he said to whom when. Of course, if one tells the truth, that’s less of a problem.

* * * * *

Lying liars gotta lie.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Before he was tagged with the nickname Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin, Brett Kimberlin was mocked at this blog as The Dread Pirate Kimberlin because of a pirate-themed blog he tried to operate for a few weeks in late 2012. Six years ago today I ran this post titled Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin of the Caribbean.

* * * * *

The paragraph at the bottom of page 55 of Mark Singer’s book Citizen K contains the following.

The only plane he ever owned was a single-engine Piper 235. For one six-month stretch, he leased a twin-engine Piper Navaho. The latter had a cargo capacity of two thousand pounds, but Kimberlin said the most exotic agricultural product he ever hauled was organic mangoes. He flew all over the country and in the Caribbean, occasionally doing smuggling reconnaissance, sometimes carrying cash, but never moving drugs.

Sometimes carrying cash. I wonder where. One reasonable suggestion would be to vendors to pay for the dope he was buying. Another possibility would be to a bank or banks in a jurisdiction with good privacy laws in order to have a bankroll to use if he had ever fled the country using his false passport.

Now, Gentle Reader, if you had a stash of money overseas and wanted to repatriate it without incurring any tax liability, how would you go about it? Would you consider setting up a “charity” with loose accounting that could receive “donations”?

It’s just an idea.

UPDATE–

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* * * * *

Yeah, like Hal Holbrook said when playing the role of Deep Throat, “Just follow the money.”

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


One of the reasons that I have ridiculed The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin is that his behavior has been ridiculous. It has been all along as was described in this post from six years ago today titled The Unique Criminal History of Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin.

* * * * *

brett-kimberlin-terrorist-in-security-guard-uniform1TDPK was busted by the FBI and U. S. Army CID for impersonating a Department of Defense police officer when he tried to have some documents copied at an Indianapolis print shop. It was that arrest that led to a search of the car that he was driving. That search turned up the bomb making materials that led to his being charged as the Speedway Bomber.

Mark Singer adds this on page 94 of his book Citizen K:

Halloween was still a few weeks away, but Brett was already in costume. He had on navy-blue trousers, a medium-blue short-sleeved shirt with a sew-on cloth Department of Defense Police shoulder patch, and a gray wide-brimmed felt hat. The overall effect—especially the Smokey the Bear flourish of the hat—bordered on slapstick. The eventual charges against Kimberlin were impersonating a Department of Defense officer, illegal possession of military insignia, and illegal possession of a facsimile of the Great Seal of the President of the United States. The latter two offenses were so obscure that Kimberlin said his later search of case law turned up no other criminal prosecutions under the relevant statutes—a statistic that seems to fit the novel circumstances under which he got himself busted.

Others have been convicted of terrorist crimes such as bombing, others have been convicted of impersonating government officers, but to be the first, and only, one convicted of illegal possession of the Presidential seal … Now, that’s a unique place in the annals of crime!

UPDATE—Mark Singer notes the “slapstick” appearance of TDPK in his getup. I note that his beard is a sufficiently gross violation of the grooming standards in place at the time that no DoD personnel, military or civilian, would have believed he was for real.

* * * * *

That silly costume fooled no one except The Dread Deadbeat Prevaricator Kimberlin himself.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


I first published the following six years ago today as a post titled Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin, Master Detective. The story is tells reveals a great deal about The Dread Deadbeat Prevaricator Kimberlin’s personality.

* * * * *

The Dread Pirate Kimberlin’s brother Scott was murdered while TDPK was in the Marion County Jail. Mark Singer reports the following on pages 313 and 314 in his book Citizen K:

As noted earlier, he [Kimberlin] told me that while in the Marion County Jail, he’d called acquaintances in Dayton, learned the name of the motel where Scott had been staying, persuaded the clerk to give him a list of phone numbers dialed from the room, and referred the police to an unfamiliar number, which guided them to the killer. “It was my quick detective work that solved the crime.”

One afternoon, the three of us, seated in Brett’s living quarters, downstairs in Carolyn’s [TDPK’s mother] home, talked about Scott. She cried as she described identifying her child’s corpse, and the crying continued as she recalled testifying during the trial of his killer. She told of driving to Dayton with her former husband and his second wife, of meeting on a Saturday with a homicide detective who said he couldn’t really get started until Monday. That weekend, she said, they began their own investigation. They canvassed motels along the interstate south of Dayton, and at the third stop she found Scott’s name in the guest register. She persuaded the clerk to provide the list of outgoing phone calls, which she gave to the detective. One of the numbers led directly to a material witness, and the killer, George Shingleton, was arrested within a week.

Another jumped connection. I avoided eye contact with Brett as Carolyn spoke. And I never chose to raise the subject with him again.

TDPK is a convicted perjurer. He has been known to tell lies.

* * * * *

A small-time junkie goes through his mother’s purse looking for cash to steal to support his habit. A wannabe big-time dealer goes through his mother’s hard work looking for a story to steal to tell to inflate his own importance.

#SSDD

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


I’ve noted from time to time that Brett Kimberlin is a liar. Of course, I’m not the first person to say so. Six years ago today, I published this post titled Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin and the Persistence of Memory.

* * * * *

the_persistence_of_memory_-_1931_salvador_daliWhen Mark Singer began writing his book Citizen K, he generally believed the claims made by TDPK. He learned his lesson. Chapter 35 is devoted to the differences between the stories Brett Kimberlin told and those of other witnesses.

Once I compared Kimberlin’s renderings of certain incidents with the recollections of other witnesses, the recurring theme of “jumping the connection” almost always emerged. When a dope dealer jumped a connection, he eliminated a middleman, hoping to cut his costs without increasing his risk. Now, both literally and figuratively, it seemed that Kimberlin has this same habit. Figurative instances were narratives in which he claimed center stage, though in reality he’d participated at a distant remove or not at all. Or, when it suited his purposes, he might do just the opposite, ascribing to others acts he in fact had performed himself.

Given the behavior I have personally witnessed in Maryland and Virginia courtrooms, he does not seem changed.

* * * * *

And based on my experience over the past six years, I can repeat my conclusion that The Dread Deadbeat Prevaricator Kimberlin hasn’t changed.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


I’ve been writing about the past and present activities of Brett Kimberlin and his band of followers/cohorts/enablers for over six years now. The story started out weird and has gotten progressively stranger. This post titled An Interesting Coincidence re #BrettKimberlin ran six years ago today

.* * * * *

We didn’t pick up yesterday’s mail until we were coming in from church this morning. Mrs. Hoge handed me a package that turned out to contain a copy of Citizen K: The Deeply Weird American Journey of Brett Kimberlin. A friend finally got me a personal copy via a used book seller.

The book has one of those clear plastic protective jackets that you find on library book, and, sure enough, it’s stamped as being a discarded book from a library. The Monroe County Public Library. In Bloomington, Indiana.

Bloomington is where TDPK was selling drugs when he was a teenager. It’s where the activities that led to his first conviction (for perjury) took place. Bloomington is turning out to be a real source of information. Perhaps some more follow up with personal contacts is in order.

.* * * * *

I’ve found all sorts of interesting sources of information as I’ve turned over various rocks while investigating Brett Kimberlin. I’ve published a great deal about him, but only enough to be able to confirm opinions I’ve expressed about him with publicly available information. Although I haven’t published nearly all the information I have, every thing I’ve written about him has been either a documented fact or a conclusion based on publicly available facts.

But just as Holmes told Watson the the Tale of the Giant Rat of Sumatra is a story for which the public is not yet ready, some things must still be handled with discretion.

Still, everything is proceeding as I have foreseen.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s music has been a subject of pointage, laughery, and mockification at this blog for years. The TKPOTD from five years ago today is an example.

* * * * *

Brett Kimberlin has had a desire for a career in the music business for decades. Between his first release from prison on his bombing sentence and when his parole was revoked, he tried to make it as a rock musician. Mark Singer tells of how he started Brettsongs, a publishing company, and put together a demo tape and promotional package.

Brett is American; he grew up on rock and roll in a musical family. At odds with the right-wing Administration during the 1980’s, he was jailed as a political prisoner. While there, he experienced first-hand suffering of the underclass and the cynicism of governments. He became a champion for those less fortunate and rose above the evil around him.

It was while in prison that Brett wrote 29 “Songs of Passion.” These songs will resonate in the hearts of people throughout the world because of their insight, honesty and directness. Moreover, many of them will, through controversy, raise the consciousness  of people everywhere. Brett’s combination of social conscience and anger, as represented  in the songs, brings comparisons to Lennon and Sting.

—”Song of Passion” Promotional Package quoted in Citizen K, p.306

I don’t know that I have ever heard any of those 29 song, so I can’t say how they resonate, but there were several items in that puff piece that struck a chord with me. The chord contained a flatted fifth.

Political prisoner? Not really. Brett Kimberlin was convicted of smuggling dope and bombing charges. I don’t care what country in the world you pick; get caught doing either of those things, and you’ll spend a long time in jail—if they don’t execute you.

Raise the consciousness … Oh, goodness! That’s a feminist term that was spun out of the Marxist idea of false consciousness.

Comparisons to Lennon and Sting? Perhaps, but certainly not favorable ones.

OK, it’s an advertising piece, and it’s puffery, but … oh, never mind.

* * * * *

A legend in his own mind, but a false narrative nonetheless.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


False narratives—they’re things that The Dread Deadbeat Pro-Se Kimberlin spreads. The TKPOTD from three years ago cites this example:

* * * * *

When Brett Kimberlin isn’t lying, he’s often shading the truth so as to mislead. Consider this from paragraph 43 of his omnibus opposition to the motions to dismiss his Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness.ECF 231-43Notice that Kimberlin does not say that he was involved in the production of any of those films. He says that he promoted them. Note also that he doesn’t say the his songs and videos were “award winning.” The sentence is a flimsy attempt to inflate Kimberlin’s standing in the music world. It’s all quite consistent with something reported by Mark Singer in Citizen K.

On page 310 he writes:

When I compared Kimberlin’s renderings of certain incidents with the recollections of other witnesses, the recurring theme of “jumping the connection” almost always emerged. When a dope dealer jumped a connection, he eliminated a middleman, hoping to cut his costs without increasing his risk. Now, both literally and figuratively, it seemed that Kimberlin had this same habit. Figurative instances were narratives in which he claimed center stage, though in reality he’d participated at a distant remove or not at all. Or, when it suited his purposes, he might do just the opposite, ascribing to others acts he had performed himself.

Lying liars gotta lie.

* * * * *

And TDPK keeps getting caught at it over and over again.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


CitizenKIt’s been a while since we looked back at Brett Kimberlin’s authorized biography, Citizen K:  The Deeply Weird American Journey of Brett Kimberlinby Mark Singer. Here’s something from page 184 about his time in the federal prison in Oxford, Wisconsin.

At Oxford, he was assigned as a quality-control clerk at a prison factory that manufactured cables for military aircraft and tanks. His task was to inspect the finished goods. Each day, he said, he did his work quickly and then tried to immerse himself in a book, but the prison guard who was his overseer objected to his reading on the job. When he persisted, the guard threatened to give him a “shot”—to write an incident report  that could lead to disciplinary action. So he stopped bringing a book to work, he said, and instead devoted his spare time to sabotage. “I’d run the cables through quality control,” he said. “I’d check them. I’d sign off on them. And then I’d cut some of the damn wires.”

Of course, he was in the slammer for a bombing conviction, so I suppose we shouldn’t be surprised that he would do something that would put someone’s life at risk.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The two RICO LOLsuits that The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin has filed against me were not his first venture into RICO madness. This is from the section in Mark Singer’s book Citizen K about TDPK in-prison business selling porn.

In January 1987, in federal court in Madison, Wisconsin, Kimberlin sued Crest Paragon Productions, alleging false advertising, breach of contract, mail fraud, conspiracy, and violations of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO). According to the complaint, instead of thirty magazines and sixteen books Kimberlin expected when he responded to a back-of-the-book advertisement placed by Crest Paragon, he was sent “fifteen pamphlets and three paperback books of low quality.” He described this material to me as “real old four-by-six black-and-white pictures that looked like they were from the 1960s and came from England.” The tepid paperbacks had titles like Making a Score and Coed Cohabitation. When Kimberlin wrote a letter demanding the material he had originally ordered, the defendant had the temerity to offer instead “sexual aids,” including, Kimberlin noted, “a live-size inflatable doll, dildos, and a vibrating plastic vagina.”

Though Kimberlin felt conflicted because “I could have made a fortune on that stuff inside prison if it wasn’t contraband,” mainly he felt compelled to sue. He asked for compensatory and punitive damages totaling $150,000. After “a fucking Reagan appointee” dismissed the suit on procedural grounds, Brett appealed to the Seventh Circuit but was told he’d have to pay an additional filing fee. “I decided at that point I’d spent enough on this,” he said. “So I just blew if off.”

—p. 203

So far, it looks like he’ll be three for three.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


As part of my background research on the Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin, I dug up a bunch of the reviews of his authorized biography Citizen K from when it was published in 1996. Considering that he hasn’t let the one year statute of limitations on defamation stop him from suing me over a non-defamatory blog post written more than a year before he filed suit, TDPK may want to consider adding these media outlets to the new suit he says he’s cooking up.

New York Times—

Mr. Singer began his reporting for the book in the summer of 1993, by going back to Indiana and checking up on what Mr. Kimberlin had told him. What he learned led him, almost immediately, to the conclusion that his subject was a liar of substantial proportions.

Entertainment Weekly—

Having since decided that his subject was, in fact, lying, he’s returned to the tale and fleshed out Kimberlin’s manipulative personality.

Baltimore Sun—

Citizen K lied. Brett lied. Lied about selling pot to Quayle. Lied about everything.

Publishers Weekly—

Quayle, it now seems, deserves apologies.

Los  Angeles Times—

Singer eventually found nearly all his complaints without foundation.

By the end of this complex tale you are left regretting that Singer and the New Yorker overlooked the sound advice of a New Yorker writer of an earlier time, James Thurber. One of his fables, about a feckless horse, ends with a moral all reporters should keep close to their hearts: “Get it right or let it alone. The conclusion you jump to may be your own.”

You see, Gentle Reader, Brett Kimberlin’s reputation as a liar goes a long way back.

Bonus Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The Gentle Reader who has been following the twists and turns of The Saga of The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin’s vexatious lawsuits has surely noticed the substantial disconnect between TPDK’s allegations and reality. This isn’t a new phenomenon. Mark Singer wrote his biography of Brett Kimberlin a couple of decades ago. Singer writes in Citizen K (p. 310):

Once I compared Kimberlin’s renderings of certain incidents with the recollection of other witnesses, the recurring theme of “jumping the connection” almost always emerged. When a dope dealer jumped a connection, he eliminated the middleman, hoping to cut his costs without increasing his risk. Now, both literally and figuratively, it seemed that Kimberlin had this same habit. Figurative instances were narratives in which he claimed center stage, though in reality he’d participated at a distance or not at all. Or, when it suited his purposes, he might do just the opposite, ascribing to others acts he in fact had performed.

Or simply put: Brett Kimberlin tells whatever lie he thinks is to his advantage at any given moment.

Citizen K


CitizenKBack in the ’90s, before Brett Kimberlin’s parole was revoked, Mark Singer extensively investigated Brett Kimberlin’s background and his claim to have sold marijuana to Dan Quayle. Citizen K is the saga of a master drug smuggler, convicted bomber, suspected murderer, jailhouse lawyer, and media manipulator, whose story about supplying marijuana to a future vice president is only the beginning.

Click here to buy the book through Amazon.

UPDATE—Mmmmm. Popcorn.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


In the summer of 1993, while Brett Kimberlin was still locked up on bombing and dope smuggling charges, Mark Singer began probing further into Kimberlin’s story. Because of what Singer had written in the New Yorker about Kimberlin’s claim to have sold marijuana to Dan Quayle, there were few sources in law enforcement who would speak with him, so Singer began looking for folks to talk to in Huntington, Indiana, (Dan Quayle’s hometown) and Bloomington, Indiana, where Kimberlin had claimed to have done business with Quayle. Singer writes in Citizen K (p. 310):

Once I compared Kimberlin’s renderings of certain incidents with the recollection of other witnesses, the recurring theme of “jumping the connection” almost always emerged. When a dope dealer jumped a connection, he eliminated the middleman, hoping to cut his costs without increasing his risk. Now, both literally and figuratively, it seemed that Kimberlin had this same habit. Figurative instances were narratives in which he claimed center stage, though in reality he’d participated at a distance or not at all. Or, when it suited his purposes, he might do just the opposite, ascribing to others acts he in fact had performed.

Or simply put: Brett Kimberlin tells whatever lie he thinks is to his advantage at any given moment.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Brett Kimberlin got caught lying to a federal grand jury and wound up convicted of perjury. He was asked about his dealing LSD to a two guys named John Buckley and David Pacific. He claimed, based on the fact that the Indiana State Police had busted Buckley and Pacific for attempting to operate a lab to produce psilocybin, that they were making LSD.

During a July, 1972, sentencing hearing for a cocaine bust while he was a juvenile, Kimberlin was asked:

Q. Did you ever sell any LSD to David Pacific or Jenkins, John Jenkins?
A. No, I wouldn’t be selling it to Pacific or John Buckley because they are the ones that had the laboratory, they are the ones that made it all. If I was to do anything I would get it from them. That’s my answer.

He repeated that testimony in October before a grand jury. A second grand jury was convened, and it indicted Kimberlin for perjury. He was convicted.

Through the years, Kimberlin has claimed that Buckley and Pacific lied about him as part of a deal with the feds. When he was working with his biographer Mark Singer, Kimberlin claimed that Cody Shearer, one of the people who had helped him promote his tale about selling marijuana to Dan Quayle, had confronted Buckley and Pacific and that they had acknowledge lying. When Singer checked with Shearer, Shearer said that he had never discussed LSD or perjury with them.

Beginning at the bottom of p. 316 in Citizen K, Mark Singer writes:

Sifting through this heap of mendacity , I asked myself whether Kimberlin lies for sport or whether an assortment of small lies coalesced into a gang of tar babies that encircled him. When I first heard about Pacific and Buckley, they amounted to an interesting brick in my wall; their role in Kimberlin’s life never rose to a sinister level. Ultimately, they signified his willingness to stay wedded to a falsehood despite black-and-white evidence to the contrary. My metaphor metamorphosed. The Pacific-Buckley factoid—the news report of their arrest, along with Kimberlin’s claim of their perjury to frame him for same—was no longer a constructive brick but one of many blind turns in a labyrinth of misinformation.

Or to put it more simply: Brett Kimberlin tells lies, and he seems to do so even when he knows there is documentary evidence proving him a liar.

Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin, Media Critic


Recently, TDPK has increased his notoriety (and infamy) by attempting to use lawfare to silence bloggers who write truthful things about him. Reading Mark Singer’s book Citizen K, it seems that his media relations have had their ups and downs. The attention he received for outlets such as NPR when he claimed to have sold dope to Dan Quayle is one of the high points. The coverage he received from his hometown papers at the time of the Speedway Bomber trials was a definite low. From page 174 …

Three days after the verdict, the Indianapolis Star published a story that described Kimberlin’s encounter with Ben Niehaus in Corpus Christi following his arrest in February 1979. This conversation, according to an investigative report filed by Niehaus, lasted five hours—or, according to Kimberlin, about five minutes. Niehaus noted that Kimberlin “stated that if we wanted to find out who murdered Mrs. Scyphers, we should consider Sandra Barton’s brother-in-law [Jack Crosby] in Austin, Texas, who Kimberlin said was a CIA agent.” The Star reporter, Joe Gelarden, paraphrased Niehaus’ written report: “According to sources, Kimberlin knew the [Crosbys] were helping the police with the Julia Scyphers murder probe. He once tried to get Niehause to investigate the [Crosbys], who took in Sandi Barton’s daughters after their grandmother was murdered. Informants reported Kimberlin left the bag at the [Crosby] residence to frame them for the Speedway bombing.”

The 1979 arrest was the bust for drug smuggling. Ben Niehaus was an investigator in the Speedway Bombing case. The bag in question was a trash bag containing bomb-making materials and an AR-15 rifle. Continuing from Citizen K

The treatment Kimberlin received from the Indianapolis media often provoked his outrage, and he was most offended by the Star. Gelarden, he explained, was a government stooge who would print anything the prosecution fed him. Complaining about this lack of integrity, he referred to “an article written by Gelarden saying that I had told Niehaus that the Scyphers murder weapon was buried in the Crosby’s backyard.”

This was a startling remark. I had read and indexed all the Indianapolis newspaper clippings about the murder and the bombings, but I’d never come across any reference to the murder weapon buried anywhere. A rereading of Gelarden’s clippings confirmed this for me. I had, however, recently heard from a government source that Kimberlin had indeed made the remark to Niehaus about the murder weapon. My bewilderment deepened: If I had never mentioned a buried weapon to Kimberlin, and if no such detail had ever been reported in the newspapers, what had prompted his denial? When a person claims to know where a murder weapon is buried, even if he’s trying to finger someone else, what does that imply?

Gentle Reader, that’s not the only time one of TDPK’s narratives has run aground on the shoals of reality. He tells so many stories that it seems he loses track.

Well, as Mark Twain once wrote, “If you tell the truth, you don’t have to remember what you said.”

Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin, Pacifist?


On page 173 of Citizen K, Mark Singer describes some of the testimony during one of TDPK’s Speedway Bomber trials. Sandi Barton worked at TDPK’s restaurant and was the mother of a young girl in whom he had taken … how shall I put this? … a special interest. Bixler was a guy who bought guns for TDPK who was, and is, prohibited from possessing firearms because of his felony record.

To counter Kimberlin’s claim that he was temperamentally incapable of violence (“not prone to assaultive behavior”), for instance, the government cited the array of weapons that had been seized during the drug bust in Texas. Among them a .22-caliber semiautomatic pistol equipped with a silencer. The testimony of Bixler placed this gun in Kimberlin’s hands, along with the half-dozen AR-15s he said he had bought for the defendant. To show that Kimberlin was not necessarily an unalloyed altruist who catered to the needs of children and grandmothers, the government confronted Sandi Barton with her grand jury testimony that, on at least two occasions, Brett had slapped [her daughter]. Another time, Sandi had told the grand jury, when [her daughter] refused to speak to Brett he seized her beloved dog, Snoopy.

A guy who isn’t “prone to assaultive behavior” and who slaps little girls—yeah, that’s the bundle of contradiction that seems to be TDPK.

Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin, Braggart


Mark Singer devotes Chapter 35 of Citizen K to the differences between TDPK’s tall tales and reality. He describes how TDPK told of a raid during which the narcs announced themselves by yelling, “Open up! Open up! DEA!” The raid in question occurred before the DEA was formed. Back then, the federal narcs were the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.

Mr. Singer continues:

There were similar stories whose only corroborating witnesses were dead or otherwise unavailable—Kimberlin’s tale, for instance, of being robbed by a junkie in Bloomington when he was sixteen years old. The specifics of that one never struck me as especially plausible—a hundred pound kid wrestling a .38-caliber gun from a junkie—but it was virtually impossible to prove it a fabrication. What mattered about such vignettes was their portrayal of a fearless, at times even heroic, protagonist. The tale-teller was a short fellow who needed to be looked up to, who consistently sought relationships with females much younger than himself, who could boast to an eighteen-year-old woman he’d just met on the bus that he was “one of the strongest men in the world.”

The phrase a legend in his own mind seems appropriate.

A Liar Selling Drugs


Continuing with our recent Dread Pirate Kimberlin v. Reality theme, let’s take another look into Chapter 35 of Citizen K by Mark Singer. The Gentle Reader who is familiar with TDPK knows that his first jail term was for perjury during grand jury testimony related to selling LSD.

In 1992, when Kimberlin told me that he trafficked only in marijuana and hashish—besides cocaine just that once—he stated emphatically that he had never sold LSD. “I don’t remember ever selling any hallucinogens. I mean, it’s possible, like, five hits of this or that. But it’s not in my memory base.” He also said, “I’ve never even seen amphetamines.” Yet the same court transcript contained his testimony that he had dealt in small quantities of LSD and methamphetamine. He had bought amphetamines and given them to this girlfriend, he said, because she was trying to lose weight.

Kimberlin exploited the fact that [David] Pacific and [John] Buckley were arrested on drug charges in October 1971, when according to a report in the Indianapolis News, more than $20,000 worth of laboratory equipment was confiscated. But in a 1994 meeting, Pacific told me the “laboratory equipment” was actually vegetable-canning paraphernalia plus a few flasks and petri dishes … the by-product of his and Buckley’s failed experiment to synthesize psilocybin. They had never, he maintained, tried to manufacture LSD. Why go to the trouble when the finished product was so accessible at the cost of about seven cents a hit?

“So you and Buckley weren’t making acid?”

“Oh, no. Good heavens, no,” said Pacific—a quaint-sounding denial that encouraged me to check with the prosecutor, Scott Miller, a former assistant U. S. attorney who’d headed the Bureau of Narcotics “strike-force grand jury,” stated that Pacific and Buckley weren’t manufacturers of LSD but mere jobbers. Though Miller suspected that Kimberlin was one of their suppliers, he opted to pursue a perjury indictment rather than a drug indictment. The government’s general impression was corroborated by Tim Young, who told me that Brett was his source in several “multithousand-hit deals.”

“I probably sold fifty to seventy-five thousand hits of acid in my life, over a year and a half period,” Young said. “Purple microdot and orange sunshine are the two I remember. How much of it from Brett? All of it. I don’t remember buying acid from anyone but Brett. He sold it to me about ten thousand hits at a time. If he said he never sold acid, he’s a lying [redacted]. Guarantee.”

Isn’t it amazing how much of TDPK’s narrative seems to be contradicted by other witnesses, court transcripts, and the like?

Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin, Master Detective


The Dread Pirate Kimberlin’s brother Scott was murdered while TDPK was in the Marion County Jail. Mark Singer reports the following on pages 313 and 314 in his book Citizen K:

As noted earlier, he [Kimberlin] told me that while in the Marion County Jail, he’d called acquaintances in Dayton, learned the name of the motel where Scott had been staying, persuaded the clerk to give him a list of phone numbers dialed from the room, and referred the police to an unfamiliar number, which guided them to the killer. “It was my quick detective work that solved the crime.”

One afternoon, the three of us, seated in Brett’s living quarters, downstairs in Carolyn’s [TDPK’s mother] home, talked about Scott. She cried as she described identifying her child’s corpse, and the crying continued as she recalled testifying during the trial of his killer. She told of driving to Dayton with her former husband and his second wife, of meeting on a Saturday with a homicide detective who said he couldn’t really get started until Monday. That weekend, she said, they began their own investigation. They canvassed motels along the interstate south of Dayton, and at the third stop she found Scott’s name in the guest register. She persuaded the clerk to provide the list of outgoing phone calls, which she gave to the detective. One of the numbers led directly to a material witness, and the killer, George Shingleton, was arrested within a week.

Another jumped connection. I avoided eye contact with Brett as Carolyn spoke. And I never chose to raise the subject with him again.

TDPK is a convicted perjurer. He has been known to tell lies.

Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin and Alternative Healing


There’s a whole chapter in Mark Singer’s Citizen K (Ch. 35) that deals with TDPK’s alternate version of reality as compared to the recollections of others. One story deals with an attempt at alternative healing.

When his high school girlfriend Susan Harvey, then in her early twenties, lay comatose in the hospital after a terrible car accident, he saved her life—so he said. Her doctor told the family to “pray for her to die, that she probably wouldn’t come out of it.” Kimberlin, the sole believer in recovery, “stayed by her side for literally three months.” He had mystical experiences in her hospital room, where he spent a lot of time in “meditation and affirmation.” To discourage scarring, he salved her wounds with vitamin E. …

Kimberlin advised me to speak to Susan’s mother, who he assured me was quite fond of him. “He was a nice teenager, I think, ” Darlene Harvey told me. “But my children said I didn’t know him very well.” Brett’s ministrations, she asserted, had not been beneficial. “We hired private-duty nurses so Susan wouldn’t fall out of the bed, but they were worth nothing. I went in one evening after work and found this one nurse has gone to eat and left her alone. So that was that, no more private nurses. I guess after that Brett and his mother would slip in the back door to visit her. He poured oil on her stomach, which was all cut open from surgery. It was vitamin E or something like that. The surgeon was so outraged—he read the riot act to me. Brett didn’t nurse her back. He might have thought he did. ‘Nursing her back’ is a figment of his imagination. The surgeon said if that oil had gotten into her stomach it would have killed her. Brett thinks one thing, but the doctor thinks another, and I’m sure the doctor knows more about this particular situation.” Susan Harvey refused to be interviewed, allowing only that she wanted “nothing to do with Brett Kimberlin.”

If the Rules of Civil Procedure don’t apply to TDPK, why should the rules related to medicine?

Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin and the Persistence of Memory


the_persistence_of_memory_-_1931_salvador_daliWhen Mark Singer began writing his book Citizen K, he generally believed the claims made by TDPK. He learned his lesson. Chapter 35 is devoted to the differences between the stories Brett Kimberlin told and those of other witnesses.

Once I compared Kimberlin’s renderings of certain incidents with the recollections of other witnesses, the recurring theme of “jumping the connection” almost always emerged. When a dope dealer jumped a connection, he eliminated a middleman, hoping to cut his costs without increasing his risk. Now, both literally and figuratively, it seemed that Kimberlin has this same habit. Figurative instances were narratives in which he claimed center stage, though in reality he’d participated at a distant remove or not at all. Or, when it suited his purposes, he might do just the opposite, ascribing to others acts he in fact had performed himself.

Given the behavior I have personally witnessed in Maryland and Virginia courtrooms, he does not seem changed.