HH 901


Herbig Haro 901 is a multiple light-years tall pillar of gas and dust inside the star-forming region know as the Carina Nebula. It contains several massive young stars which emit powerful jets that emerge from the cloud. Some of the jets create bow-shock patterns similar to the bow waves of a ship plowing through the ocean. Very few of these stars can be seen  because the gas and dust block starlight, but in an infrared view, more stars become visible. The visible-light colors result from the glow of different gases: oxygen (blue), hydrogen/nitrogen (green), and sulfur (red). The Carina Nebula is approximately 7,500 light years from Earth.

Video Credit: NASA / ESA / STScI

An Interstellar Monster?


carina06_hubble_960Lurking inside the head of this interstellar monster is a star that is slowly destroying it. The monster is really an inanimate pillar of gas and dust that is over a light year long. The star, which is hidden by the thick cloud of dust, is bursting out energetic beams of particles that will eventually disperse the cloud. Similar star v. dust cloud battles are being played out all over the star-forming region known as the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). The stars will win in the end, and their pillars of creation will be blown apart over the next 100,000 years or so. The result will be a new open cluster of stars. The pink dots are newly formed stars that have already freed themselves from their dust cloud nurseries.

Image Credit: NASA

Trumpler 14


Trompler 14This glittering star cluster that contains some of the brightest stars our galaxy. Trumpler 14 is located 8,000 light-years away in a large star-formation region called the Carina Nebula. Because the cluster is relatively young, only 500,000 years old, it has one of the highest concentrations of massive, luminous stars in the entire Milky Way.

The dark spot left of center is a blob of gas and dust seen in silhouette.

Image Credit: NASA / ESA

A Carina Nebula Dust Pillar


Carina Dust PillarThis cosmic pillar of gas and dust is almost a couple of light-years wide. It’s a part one of our galaxy’s largest star forming regions, the Carina Nebula, visible in southern skies. The nebula is around 7,500 light-years away. While the pillar has been shaped by the winds and radiation of the nebula’s young, hot, massive stars, it’s interior is home to stars in the process of formation. A penetrating infrared view shows the pillar is dominated by two, narrow, energetic jets blasting outward from a hidden infant star.Carina Pillar IRImage Credits: ESA / NASA

An Interstellar Monster?


carina06_hubble_960Lurking inside the head of this interstellar monster is a star that is slowly destroying it. The monster is really an inanimate pillar of gas and dust that is over a light year long. The star, which is hidden by the thick cloud of dust, is bursting out energetic beams of particles that will eventually disperse the cloud. Similar star v. dust cloud battles are being played out all over the star-forming region known as the Carina Nebula (NGC 3372). The stars will win in the end, and their pillars of creation will be blown apart over the next 100,000 years or so. The result will be a new open cluster of stars. The pink dots are newly formed stars that have already freed themselves from their dust cloud nurseries.

Image Credit: NASA