Bennu 360


This set of images shows one full revolution of the asteroid Bennu. The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft acquired an image for every 10 degrees during the asteroid’s 4 hour and 11 minute rotation from a range of just under 200 km last Friday. Bennu is approximately 200 pixels wide in the images.

Image Credits: NASA

Closing in on Bennu


This set of 16 images was taken the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft during its approach on the asteroid Bennu during the last half of October. From the 12th through the 29th, the long-range PolyCam camera took one optical navigation image per day, except on the 16th and 17th when PolyCam was not scheduled to take images. The spacecraft was roughly 44,000 km from Bennu when the first image was taken. The last image was taken from a distance of around 320 km.

Image Credits: NASA

Closing in on Bennu


OSIRIS-REx spacecraft is closing in on the asteroid Bennu. On 17 /august, the spacecraft obtained its first images of its target asteroidfrom a distance of 2.2 million km. That’s about 6X the distance from the Earth to the Moon. This cropped set of five images was obtained over the course of an hour to assist the mission’s navigation team. Bennu is visible as a moving object against the stars in the constellation Serpens.

Image Credit: NASA

Jupiter from an Unusual Vantage Point


This isn’t your typical backyard telescope view of Jupiter and three of its moons (Io, Ganymede, and Callisto). It was taken by the long range camera aboard the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft in August, 2017, when it was about 170 million km from Earth and roughly 670 million km from Jupiter.

OSIRIS-REx is now closing in on the asteroid Bennu and will land there later this year to collect a sample of its surface material. If the mission goes as planned, the spacecraft will return the sample to Earth in 2023.

Image Credit: NASA