High-Capacity Ignorance


This tweet went viral on the Twitterz yesterday evening, and there was much pointage, laughery, and mockification directed at CBS—I was left wondering what the reporter thought was an “assault revolver” and if I owned anything that might qualify. The revolver in my gun locker that probably comes closest to fitting the bill is my grandfather’s old H&R Sentinel. It’s a .22 with a 9-round cylinder.It’s a reasonable plinker, the sort of gun that old men carried in their tackle boxes when I was a kid. These days, it’s obsolete and being replaced by 10-shot .22 revolvers made of stainless steel.

AR-15s are also .22 caliber. That may be what confused the reporter.

Don’t Know Much About History


CNN’s Legal Analyst: The Founders never envisioned Supreme Court justices living past their 50s (H/T: The Washington Free Beacon)

Here’s the roster of the first six justices of the Supreme Court who were a nominated under the Judiciary Act of 1789 by George Washington and confirmed by the Senate:

John Rutledge, confirmed 1789, born 1739, age 50
John Blair, confirmed 1790, born 1732, age 58
John Jay, confirmed 1789, born 1740, age 49
William Cushing, confirmed 1790, born 1732, age 58
James Iredell, confirmed 1790, born 1751, age 39
James Wilson, confirmed 1790, born 1742, age 48

Four of the original justices lived past their 50s: Rutledge, 61; Blair, 68; Jay, 83; and Cushing, 78.

UPDATE—In fact, at least one of the Founders, the author of Federalist No. 78, explicitly stated that lifetime judicial appointments were critical to the proper functioning of the judiciary.

Upon the whole, there can be no room to doubt that the convention acted wisely in copying from the models of those constitutions which have established GOOD BEHAVIOR as the tenure of their judicial offices, in point of duration; and that so far from being blamable on this account, their plan would have been inexcusably defective, if it had wanted this important feature of good government.

Read the whole thing.

Blognet


Sergeant Friday and Officer Smith are still away helping with a case in another jurisdiction. Here’s a recycled episode.

BlognetTitleCard

MUSIC: Theme. Intro and fade under.

NARRATOR: Ladies and gentlemen, the story you are about to hear is true. The names have been changed to protect the innocent.

MUSIC: Up, then under …

NARRATOR: You’re a Detective Sergeant. You’re assigned to Internet Detail. A noted anti-First-Amendment activist is seeking a peace order against a blogger, accusing him of assault. Your job … get the facts.

MUSIC: Up then under …

ANNOUNCER: Blognet … the documented drama of an actual case. For the next few minutes, in cooperation with the Twitter Town Sheriff’s Department, you will travel step by step on the side of the good guys through an actual case transcribed from official files. From beginning to end, from crime to punishment, Blognet is the story of the good guys in action.

MUSIC: Up and out.

SOUND: Footsteps in hallway.

FRIDAY: It was Wednesday, January 11th. It was chilly in Westminster. We were working the day watch out of Internet Detail. My partner’s Liz Smith. The boss is Twitter Town Sheriff W. J. J. Hoge. My name’s Friday. It was 6:47 am when I got to Room S-140. Internet Detail.

Continue reading