I’m Not Making This Up, You Know

Really?

My rifle chambered in .17 Remington fires a 25 grain bullet with a muzzle velocity just over 4,000 ft/s. Now, my AR-15 is chambered for 7.62x39mm (It’s a long story), but I doubt that it launches one of the 123 grain bullets in the Hornady ammo I use for deer hunting at 20,000 ft/s. That would result in a muzzle energy over 100,000 ft•lb. which about 8 X the muzzle energy of a round fired from a .50 cal. M2 machine gun. My AR doesn’t seem to kick that hard.

UPDATE—FWIW, the typical muzzle velocity of a bullet fired from an AR-15 chambered for common 5.56x45mm ammunition is about 3,150 ft/s. The only combination of firearms and ammunition that I can find in my gun safe and ammo locker that could produce a muzzle velocity as low as 625 ft/s (1/5 of 3,150) would be a short-barreled revolver loaded with .22 Shorts or a muzzle-loading rifle with a dangerously low powder charge.

Hunting Deer with an AR-15?

I own a Colt AR-15 Sporter chambered in the unusual caliber (for an AR) of 7.62X39mm. I use it for hunting deer in wooded terrain. Because of the taper of the cartridge case, a magazine that would normally hold 20 rounds of 5.56mm NATO ammunition will only hold 5 rounds of 7.62x39mm. Other than being semi-automatic and having lower ammunition capacity, it’s the functional equivalent of a typical .30/30 lever action rifle.

ColtSporter-1When I first moved to Maryland in the early ’90s, I had hunting privileges in an overgrown orchard next to a 6,000 acre no-hunting environmental area and a 200 acre corn/soybean field. The woods were dense enough that the longest shot possible was less than 100 yards, so a .270 Win. or .30/06 was overkill. I used a .45/70 rifle for the first few years but decided that something like a .30/30 would make more sense. I went to a gun show looking for a deal on a Marlin 336 lever action rifle and stumbled on a dealer who had a Colt AR-15 in 7.62×39 mm that he wanted to sell cheap. The price was right, and I bought it. It’s been a nice woods gun, performing well with Winchester 123 gr. soft points. I’ve had even better results using the now-out-of-print Hornady Zombiemax and the Hornady 123 gr. Black ammo.

So, yes, you can hunt deer with an AR-15. I’ve been using mine for woodland hunting for almost 30 years.

Four Important Rules

Given the recent news of what appears to be an accidental shooting on a movie set, it may useful to remind ourselves of four important rules.

1. All firearms are always handled as if they are loaded.

2. Never point a firearm at anything you are not willing to destroy.

3. Keep your finger off the trigger until the sights are aligned with your target.

4. Be sure of your target.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day

One of the recurring lies that Brett Kimberlin has told about Aaron Walker and me is that we have ever threatened him with violence. The TKPOTD for six years ago today dealt with one of the false claims he made in the RICO Retread LOLsuit.

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This is from The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin’s Kimberlin v. Most of the Universe, et al. RICO Retread LOLsuit.ECF 1-65

popcorn4bkThese are what lawyers call conclusory allegations, that is, they are offered with no evidence to support them. TDPK makes those allegations without actually specifying when or where or how we did any of those things. Come Thursday, we’ll see what Judge Mason thinks about them as he rules on the various defendants’ motions to dismiss.

Stay tuned.

BTW, the most recent blog post that I’ve published about a trip to the range was in 2013.

* * * * *

Of course, I occasionally post pictures of targets I’ve shot. Here’s one. Deer season is coming, and this is the result of zeroing my Mossberg .243 Winchester at 200 yards with Hornady 95 gr SST ammunition.I’ve always been the worst shot in the family.

My Other AR

I’ve occasionally mentioned that I own a Colt AR15 Sporter chambered in the unusual caliber of 7.62X39mm. I use it for hunting deer in wooded terrain. Because of the taper of the cartridge case, a magazine that would normally hold 20 rounds of 5.56mm NATO ammunition will only hold 5 rounds of 7.62x39mm. Other than being semi-automatic and having lower ammunition capacity, it’s essentially the functional equivalent of a Model 1894 Winchester lever action rifle.

The Hoge household also owns another AR. It’s an AR-7, a take-down rifle that’s easy to carry packed away while backpacking or canoeing. The barrel, receiver, and magazine can be taken apart and stored in the stock. The current version made by Henry Repeating Arms will float either assembled or disassembled. It’s chambered in .22LR, so it’s cheap to shoot, and it’s accurate enough to take small game out to any range that such critters should be hunted with a .22.

UPDATE—Of course, the AR-7 does have a history in movie fiction as a sniper rifle. James Bond was issued one in From Russia With Love. I suppose that will be sufficient justification for Robert O’Rourke coming to confiscate our AR-7s as well.

High-Capacity Ignorance

This tweet went viral on the Twitterz yesterday evening, and there was much pointage, laughery, and mockification directed at CBS—I was left wondering what the reporter thought was an “assault revolver” and if I owned anything that might qualify. The revolver in my gun locker that probably comes closest to fitting the bill is my grandfather’s old H&R Sentinel. It’s a .22 with a 9-round cylinder.It’s a reasonable plinker, the sort of gun that old men carried in their tackle boxes when I was a kid. These days, it’s obsolete and being replaced by 10-shot .22 revolvers made of stainless steel.

AR-15s are also .22 caliber. That may be what confused the reporter.

A Sweet Sixteen

I usually stay away from retail stores during Thanksgiving weekend, especially on Black Friday. However, I went into a sporting goods store late yesterday to replenish some supplies. As I was walking past the gun counter, I noticed that they had a Browning A5 16-ga shotgun in stock and that it was on sale for a bit more than 25% off and there was a $200 mail-in rebate offer. I’ve always wanted a 16-ga shotgun, and now I have one.At a bit under 6 lbs, the A5 is as handy as a 20-ga, but it throws almost as much shot as a 12. I look forward to giving it a try on some upland game.

I’m Not Making This Up, You Know

There’s now a “movement” to eliminate the use of black targets in law enforcement training because of claims that “young black men are 3X more likely to be shot by trained shooters than their white peers” and a “study by University of Illinois researchers that concluded shooters were more likely to fire at a black target.” (H/T, guns.com)

aw20170219Correlation is not the same thing as causation, so statistically, there are two questions that should examined concerning that “3X more likely” claim—if it is true. First, young black men are a small subset of the population, but, as a group, they appear to be more likely that average to be involved in crime. How much more likely? 3X? More? If more likely, one is led to wonder why they would be shot less frequently than their share of dangerous interactions with police (or armed victims) would suggest. Second, how much more likely than average are young black men to be shot at (including being missed) by untrained shooters? It could be that one reason young black men are only 3X more likely to be shot by trained shooters is that training reduces the probability of an unjustified shooting.

Both of those factors may come into play. Or neither.

I’m Not Making This Up, You Know

Bearing Arms reports that Iowa sheriff Mike Johnstone, who opposed allowing “shall issue” gun permits in that state, has shot himself while trying to clean his Glock.

Johnstone removed the magazine from his pistol but failed to do a chamber check before squeezing the trigger as part of the Glock design’s standard takedown process.

While allowing citizens to carry firearms in public has not resulted in “blood in the streets,” carelessness by “highly-trained professionals” … oh, never mind.

Drafting Women

Anna Granville has a post over at Task & Purpose arguing that it’s time that women should have to register for the draft.

The picture at the top of the article shows a group of female soldiers training with the M9 pistol and it shows one of the subtile difficulties in integrating women into the combat force. The soldier in the foreground is not only left-handed, her hands are too small to properly grip the pistol. As a result her strong hand is twisted clockwise around the grip so she can reach the trigger. Such improper alignment of the hand, wrist, and arm typically allows the hand to involuntarily rotate at the wrist as the trigger is pulled causing the muzzle to move toward the weak hand (the right for a southpaw). This is a common problem for those of us with small hands. I find the Beretta 92/M9 difficult to manage. Someone with hands the size of Mrs. Hoge’s would likely find the M9 even more difficult, but she might have no trouble with a pistol with a smaller grip such as a Browning HiPower or a M1911.

This is not to say that women can’t be better integrated into combat forces, but if we are going to do so, they deserve to have equipment that fits their generally smaller physiques.

The FBI, the Army, and 9 mm

The Army is looking to replace its current stock of M9 and M11 9 mm pistols with newer, more modern weapons. One interesting twist in the request for submissions from potential vendors is that the choice of caliber has been left open. This has led to speculation that the Army may wind up joining the Coast Guard in adopting the .40 S&W round or the Marines who have partially readopted .45 ACP. Some have suggested that the .357 Sig round might be chosen.

Meanwhile, the FBI has announced that it will begin transitioning its agents from .40 S&W to 9 mm. Apparently, a significant number of Special Agents have difficulty mastering a pistol chambered for the more powerful round. Given that 9 mm ammunition has been greatly improved over the past couple of decades (and is significantly less expensive than .40 S&W), the change is not unreasonable for a large, bureaucratic organization.

If the Gentle Reader were to spend some time pursuing the comments on various sites reporting on these two stories, he will find them filled with the pontifications of a plethora of Internet arm chair experts, almost none of whom have any real world experience or practical knowledge of combat shooting with a handgun. My personal preference is for a Model 1911 pistol in .45 ACP, but that is based on my training and actual combat experience. I suspect that the FBI will wind up swapping their .40 Glocks for 9 mm Glocks or something very similar. It will be interesting to see what wins the Army’s shootout.

A Busy Signal

Yesterday, I tried to connect to Mossberg’s website. I wanted to look up some information on an old shotgun that’s been in the family since before I was born, an old pre-WWII bolt action .410. I couldn’t get through.

And then I found out that Mossberg has just released several Duck Commander models.

That explains the increased traffic. I guess I’ll wait for the rush to subside. It’s still busy this morning.

Shooting Lessons from a Governor

Texas Governor Rick Perry met with a group of bloggers at a shooting range, and Kathleen McKinley tells about her shooting lesson from him. The pistol used was the same Ruger LCP that Gov. Perry used to dispatch a coyote that attacked while he was walking his dog.

BTW, I concur with his choice of the LCP with a laser sight as a small carry gun.

Rick Perry isn’t the first politician to carry a .380 pistol for personal protection. President Theodore Roosevelt packed a Colt Model 1908. How many other current governors do you think carry for their own protection, and how many completely rely on bodyguards? I know which way I’d bet on Martin O’Malley, the Governor of Maryland.

[youtube http://youtu.be/WjKB4h8pM5Y]

A Slick Product

Rem OilRem Oil is not really a penetrating oil like good old WD-40, but it is probably a better all-purpose spray can lubricant. It was designed as a gun cleaner/lubricant, and it cleans dirt and grime from exposed metal surfaces while displacing moisture from the pores in the surface of the metal. It also contains Teflon which provides a thin, long-lasting film that keeps things working smoothly by reducing metal-to-metal wear.

Buy it via Amazon.

Why I Don’t Own a Glock

A small child managed to fire a police officer’s holstered Glock 35 pistol, wounding the policeman in the leg. More info here.

Glock pistols are probably the most common type found in police holsters now days. There are two reasons. One is that Glock is very aggressive with their pricing in a time of tight budgets. The other is that, like double action revolvers, Glocks are easy to shoot. The only external safety is on the trigger, so pulling the trigger disengages the safety, firing the pistol.

My objection to the Glock is that it’s too easy to shoot. The standard trigger requires much less force to pull than a double action revolver’s. I prefer a pistol with at least one external safety (not on the trigger) which must be manipulated in order for the weapon to fire. For example, a Model 1911 pistol requires that the thumb safety be set off and the grip safety be fully depressed before the trigger can cause the pistol to fire. The M9 pistol currently issued by the Armed Forces requires that the thumb safety be set off before it can be fired.

It appears that the cop, who is supposed to be a highly-trained SWAT officer, was openly carrying his Glock in a holster that did not cover the trigger. That looks like gross negligence to me. A small child pulled the trigger in this incident. Brushing up against a stiff branch on a bush could have done the same thing.

But remember, it’s only those highly trained government agents who can be trusted with firearms.

UPDATE—The Model 1911A1 pistol.M1911_C_A_D.001

An Afternoon at the Range

RANGE_PHOTOOur cat Bob is an indoor/outdoor cat, and he occasionally brings in fleas. This afternoon, we fogged the house. My son went to work, my wife went to a bridal shower, and I went to the range for some practice. I took Mrs. Hoge’s S&W Model 60 .38 Special, a Browning Buck Mark .22 LR target pistol, and a Kimber Model 1911 .45 ACP.

After limbering up with the .22, I practiced with the Model 60, aiming with the Crimson Trace laser grip. My results were strikingly better with the laser compared to the normal sights, but that’s not surprising given that I’m 65 years old and my eyes aren’t what they used to be.

The target above is the result of 50 rounds through the Kimber at 50 feet. I’ve always done well with a Model 1911, but this is one of the better targets I’ve shot recently.

A Derp Brain Photo

Cabin Boy Bill’s bio says he served during the Viet Nam era as Navy Medical Corpsman and that he did a tour with a Marine Corps unit. Based on that, I assume that he would have qualified with the M16 rifle and that he should still retain at least a passing familiarity with it and the Marines’ standards of safe gun handling.

Schmalfeldt has spent the past couple of days whining about an unfairly cropped photo which he says unjustly portrays him as “crazed and evil.” This image is an unedited copy of one he posted at Breitbart Unmasked.GE

The Four Rules of Gun Safety (as stated by Lt. Col. Jeff Cooper, USMC Ret.) are

1. All firearms are always handled as if they were loaded.
2. Never point a firearm at anything you are unwilling to destroy.
3. Keep your finger off the trigger until the sights are aligned on the target.
4. Be sure of your target.

This picture shows the Cabin Boy violating all four at once.

The picture clearly shows that Bill Schmalfeldt is irresponsible. The Gentle Reader may form his own opinions about “crazed” or “evil.”

Hello, Foot. Meet Gun.

I’m told that shooting oneself in the foot is a bad idea. I suppose so. I’ve never tried it, although I have been around more than my share of negligent firearm discharges.

There are four very simple rules which will make a negligent discharge unlikely.

1. All firearms are always handled as if they are loaded.
2. Never point the muzzle of a firearm at anything you are unwilling to destroy.
3. Keep your finger off the trigger until the sights are aligned on the target.
4. Be sure of your target.

Those rules are simple, and following them will keep you from negligently shooting yourself or any one or thing else. The rules and laws governing who can have a gun and under what circumstances are more complicated, and failure to attend to those rules can also be quite painful.

Here in Maryland, for instance, for almost 20 years we have had strict controls on the transfers of certain kinds of rifles and magazines. Here’s how that affects me.

I have a collector’s item WWII vintage M1 Carbine made by National Postal Meter. It isn’t on any of the state no-no lists, at least not yet. However, the 30-round magazines commonly used with M1 Carbines are restricted in that they cannot be transferred to another individual in Maryland. So if I take my Carbine to the range, I can shoot it using one of my old 30-round magazines, but if I allow someone else to shoot it (lending it is a transfer), they must use a 15-round magazine because I can’t transfer the 30-round magazine to them.

I also have a Colt AR15 Sporter Carbine. It doesn’t use the usual .223 Remington/5.56 mm NATO ammunition; it’s chambered for 7.62 X 39 mm Russian round that is legal for deer hunting in Maryland. The only magazines I have for it are the 5-round units provided by Colt. Since an AR15 is regulated firearm, I can’t just hand it to whomever I wish. So-called “gratuitous” temporary loans are OK, but anyone other than a family member, close friend, or licensed dealer can be risky. All transfers are supposed to go through a licensed dealer. However, the 5-round magazines have no restrictions whatsoever.

This is what happens when laws are cobbled together by people who have little understanding of what they are trying to regulate. When I was a federally licensed dealer a couple of decades ago, there were over 20,000 federal, state, and local gun laws in the book that the ATF sent me, some of them contradictory. There are more of ’em now.

Sigh.