Nice Court You’ve Got There—It’d Be A Shame If Something Happened To It


Senator Whitehouse (D-RI) has filed a brief with the Supreme Court in case of New York State Rifle and Pistol Association v. City of New York. In his brief he warns the court not to take up the case, lest it find itself ruling in favor of the Second Amendment claim made by the petitioner.

The Supreme Court is not well. And the people know it. Perhaps the Court can heal itself before the public demands it be “restructured in order to reduce the influence of politics,”

FDR’s threat of court packing worked 80-some-odd years ago. I hope the justices ignore this one.

BTW, Dick Durbin, Kirsten Gillibrand, Richard Blumenthal, and Mazie Hirono all signed on to Whitehouse’s threat to the court.

No, We Don’t Need Massachusetts’ Gun Laws


Bearing Arms has a post up about Rep. Seth Moulton claim that the rest of the county should adopt the gun laws of his home state Massachusetts.

No residents of Lexington or Concord were available for comment, but I will note that if Massachusetts had had the same sort of gun laws in 1775 as it has today, our national anthem would be God Save the Queen.

Interesting Times in Hong Kong


Pro-freedom demonstrations have been going on for the past few months in Hong Kong. The National Interest has a thought-provoking post about the demonstrators and their goals.

In Hong Kong, revolution is in the air. What started out as an unexpectedly large demonstration in late April against a piece of legislation—an extradition bill—has become a call for democracy in the territory as well as independence from China and the end of communism on Chinese soil.

Almost nobody thinks any of these things can happen, but they forget that Chinese rebellions and revolutions often start at the periphery and then work their way to the center. The Qing dynasty of the Manchus, the last imperial reign, unraveled from the edges, as did others.

Some of the demonstrators have been carrying signs reading, “We need the Second Amendment.” Well, yes. As the saying goes, ” You can vote your way into socialism, but you’ll have to shoot your way out.”

El Paso and Dayton … and Chicago


The past weekend had a rather high body count.

Here are some facts about may not be extensively covered by the Main Stream Media—

All three cities are run by Democrats. El Paso has a Republican mayor, but almost every other state or local politician representing the City of El Paso or El Paso County is a Democrat. Mayors Nan Whaley (Dayton) and Lori Lightfoot (Chicago) are Democrats.

The Dayton shooter was a fan of Bernie and Fauxcahontas. And a gun control advocate.

The flow of victims from the multiple shootings in Chicago was so great that one hospital’s emergency room was overwhelmed and was forced to stop accepting patients.

Talking About Something He Knows Nothing About


Breitbart has a post up about some of the more stupid ideas Eric Swalwell has advanced concerning gun control. Most of his proposals demonstrate that he has essentially no understanding of firearms in the Real World.

For example, he thinks that it’s a good idea to restrict ammunition ownership to no more than 200 rounds of any caliber. If he had walked through the ammo aisles at a Bass Pro or Cabela’s (or a Dick’s), he’d have seen that one of the most common package counts for .22LR ammo is around 500 rounds. In fact, the last box of .22LR rounds I bought contained 525, just enough for a weekend of plinking with a couple of friends.

I suppose that there are people who buy ammunition and horde it, but those of us who shoot for a hobby and/or train to maintain proficiency in shooting safely and accurately go through what we buy. Buying practice ammo in bulk saves money and makes it easier to train. Why would a thoughtful person want to make it more difficult to maintain a high level of proficiency in safe firearm handling?

BTW, given my collection of oddball firearms, I’d be able to keep over 4,000 rounds of ammunition under Swalwell’s proposed limit.

A Note on the First and Second Amendments


Journalist Andy Ngo was attacked last Saturday by a gang of AntiFa thugs because he was exercising his free press rights guaranteed by the First Amendment.

I note that while the First Amendment also grants the right to peaceable assembly, that’s not what AntifFa was doing.

AntiFa’s tactics seem to be spiraling toward ever greater violence. It’s beginning to look as if their expectation that they can act with impunity will lead them to attack someone who is willing to defend himself and prepared to do so. I suspect that they will won’t do well in such a confrontation.

I also suspect that the rank-and-file AntiFa members’ apparent ignorance of history eventually will do them in. When the Sturmabteilung became more trouble than they were worth, the long knives came out. When AntiFa is no longer useful to The Narrative, …

Democracy Dies in Derpness


WaPo has published an extremely inaccurate opinion piece about the recent Virginia Beach shooting and suppressors for firearms. In her essay, Juliette Kayyem makes the ridiculously false claim that “a suppressed gunshot can sound like a chair scraping on the floor.” It appears that she’s seen too many Hollywood movies in which the sound of suppressed gunfire on films’ soundtracks were special effects added during postproduction and recordings of real gunfire and that she has little (on no) experience with real world suppressed firearms.

(BTW, based on my experience being involved in the development of theatre sound equipment when I was VP of Engineering at JBL, I doubt that many theatre sound systems can reproduce the sound of gunfire as loud as the actual muzzle blast without being damaged.)

When Hiram Percy Maxim began marketing exhaust quieting devices for internal combustion engines and firearms over a hundred years ago, his brand name for them was Silencer. That name stuck as a generic term in Europe for engines and worldwide for firearms. In North America, we call them mufflers on engines. The generic technical term of art for them is suppressors.

A suppressor is what we engineers call an acoustical low-pass filter. It permits exhaust gas to flow through (in the case of firearm suppressor to provide thrust for the bullet) but tends to reduce the level of high-frequency components in the impulse of the exhaust. If a suppressor worked “perfectly,” there would be nothing in the exhaust except a steady, non-varying flow of exhaust gas, but in order to become more effective at low frequencies, the suppressor must become larger to allow it to attenuate longer wavelength sounds.

An unmuffled engine on a lawn mower is roughly as loud as a series of gunshots, and the size of a lawn mower muffler is roughly the same as a suppressor that can be handled on the muzzle of a firearm. The Gentle Reader should not be surprised that suppressed firearms are typically about as loud as lawn mowers. My lawn mower is noticeable louder than a chair scraping across the floor.

While I’m on the Pro-Second-Amendment side of the gun control debate, I do recognize that there are reasonable points to be made on both sides of the gun control debate. Thus, neither side should have to resort to provably false claims.

Truth is a stronger foundation than a lie.

Democracy Dies in Derpness.