An Attempted Totalitarian Twofer


A New York Senate bill would, if passed into law, require that the purchaser of any firearm

consent to have his or her social media accounts reviewed and investigated pursuant to subdivision four of this section …

Such a law would clearly violate rights secured by both the First and Second Amendments. Eugene Volokh offers an analysis of the bills constitutional deficiencies here and concludes with these words—

But remember: No-one is trying to take away your guns, or your freedom of speech.

Read the whole thing.

High-Capacity Credit Cards


Andrew Ross Sorkin has an article over at NYT reporting that some people who have used firearms in mass shooting bought their guns using credit cards.

Well, duh. Most firearms cost at least several hundred dollars, and most purchases for items that expensive are paid for using either credit or debit cards. Fifty years ago, such purchases would have likely been paid for with checks. Either method is more secure than cash, but whether an electronic or a paper transaction, the funds would have been routed through the buyer’s and seller’s banks.

Sorkin seems to think that banks should be monitoring transactions related to firearms in order to … well, someone has to do something to keep those people in flyover country from buying guns. And if the government won’t because of that pesky Second Amendment, the banks should step forward.

<sarc>Maybe Sorkin is right. It could be that we have a problem with high-capacity credit cards falling into the wrong hands. The Progressive states limit access to normal-capacity firearm magazines to specially-approved individuals. Perhaps most people should be prohibited from possessing high-capacity credit cards and only be allowed debit cards with a ten-dollar daily limit. Anyone with a legitimate need to spend a larger sum can plan ahead and withdraw cash from his bank account in a face-to-face transaction that can be subjected to a proper background check.</sarc>

If It Bleeds, It Leads


Seen at Instapundit

SEEN ON FACEBOOK: “Jesus, NBC is still wallowing in the blood. The Borderline shooting is wall-to-wall, pictures of the shooter, his full name, teary next of kin of the victims. It’s like they want copycats.”

Well, of course! Back in the ’60s when I was working in broadcasting, the film crews (this was before portable video tape recorders) would get back with their evening reels, and decisions would have to be taken (choices are taken not made) about which film to develop first. Big car crashes or other disasters would always get processed ahead of the Metro Council meetings. NBC is sticking with an ancient form which has the advantage of also supporting their anti-Second-Amendment narrative.

Gun Free Zones


As a general principle, I believe that private property owners should be able to declare their properties to be “gun free zones.” I can think of several kinds of businesses that might want to keep firearms away. For example, the muzzle flash from a firearm could cause a serious disaster in an industrial plant with volatile fumes in the air. Also, some people are hoplophobes and have an irrational fear of weapons; they should be entitled to their “safe spaces.” However, they should have to accept the consequences for doing so.

IANAL, but it seems to me that something analogous to the attractive nuisance doctrine should apply to such properties. Just as person who has an unfenced swimming pool can be held liable for a someone wandering into the pool and drowning, a property owner who invites visitors (especially, customers) into a “gun free zone” should be held liable (perhaps strictly liable) for the visitors’ safety.

Rights have responsibilities attached.

The Jacksonville Shooter and Some Facts


The shooter at the Madden 19 tournament in Jacksonville was from Maryland, and he used a handgun.

The Baltimore Sun reports that the shooter had a history of psychiatric problems that include hospitalization.

All handguns legally sold in Maryland since 1 October, 2013, have been registered with the Maryland State Police. This includes private transfers which must be run through a licensed dealer in order to create a paperwork trail for a background check.

Part of the MSP background check includes the purchaser’s mental health history. A release form for the check is part of the paperwork submitted to the MSP.

The Gentle Reader may draw what conclusions he will from these facts.