Kepler’s Supernova


In 1604, astronomer Johannes Kepler noticed a new bright object in the sky that was visible to the naked eye for the next year-and-a-half. He was seeing a supernova, the death of a star more than ten times the mass of our Sun that was 20,000 light years from Earth. This false color animation shows the remnant of Kepler’s Supernova, first in infrared, then visible light, then low energy x-rays, then high-energy x-rays, and finally all four together.

Video Credits: NASA / ESA / STScI

The Core of M100


Messier 100 is a spiral galaxy located within the southern part of constellation Coma Berenices about 55 million light-years away. It’s about 107,000 light-years in diameter and one of the brightest and largest galaxies in the Virgo Cluster. The image of the galaxy’s core shown above was taken by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2009.

Image Credits: ESA / NASA / STScI

Approaching Bennu


This series of images shows the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft’s view of Bennu during its final approach to the asteroid. They were taken beginning in mid August using the spacecraft’s PolyCam camera. The last images were taken on 27 November when the spacecraft was about 65 km away from the asteroid. During the approach, the spacecraft’s velocity with respect to Bennu slowed from around 491 m/s to about 0.04 m/s, which resulted in the seemingly slower approach speed at the end of the video.

Video Credit: NASA