Team Kimberlin Post of the Day

While I was reviewing posts for possible recycling today, the TKPOTD for 2 June, 2013, had a link to any earlier post titled Slappy McWingnut’s Surprise. That post begins by quoting a still older post.

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In December, 2011, I posted this brief article.

Christopher Hitchen’s Surprise

Allahpundit posts:

I ask this earnestly, not to troll: If Hitchens is getting a surprise, isn’t it necessarily a nasty surprise according to Christian doctrine?

Christopher Hitchens’ beliefs concerning God were nearly 180 degrees opposed to mine. Either he is in for a big surprise, or I’m not. Either he is meeting a Maker whose existence he denied, or I will pass on into nothingness when my life ends.

I greatly admired Mr. Hitchens’ talents as a writer and debater, but I believe that God is just and that, being just, God will honor the choice Mr. Hitchens took to be separated from Him.

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After listening to some of the recent preaching by Slappy McWingnut (aka Elder William, The Lord of Satire) (No, I won’t link to it.), it seems that his view of God is nearly as far out of line from mine as was Mr. Hitchen’s, but in a different direction.

McWingnut preaches that his god is a “pissed-off” god who hates being interrupted by prayers. Another part of McWingnut’s schtick seems to be that one can keep this god from being angry by giving money to support his ministry. (OK, that’s a fair parody of a lot of “religious” scam artists.) McWingnut preaches his god’s hate.

The God I serve is loving, and because He is, He grants us the freewill to choose to love or not love Him in return. If we choose to enter into a loving relationship with Him, He is delighted. If we do not, He respects our choice.

If you check out the answers in the back of the book, you’ll see that God says that at some point He will gather those of us who choose to be His to live in His presence. You’ll also see that He says that He will honor the wishes of those who have chosen not to love Him.

My God loves everyone, including Slappy McWingnut.

UPDATE—I’ve had a question about describing God’s reaction to our love for Him as “delight.” In the opening section of Ephesians, Paul writes that God’s intention for us is

… εἰς υἱοθεσίαν διὰ Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ εἰς αὐτόν κατὰ τὴν εὐδοκίαν τοῦ θελήματος αὐτοῦ …

which can be translated as

… for adoption as children through Jesus Christ according to the delight of His will …

That word in boldface, εὐδοκίαν, literally means well-seeming or, idiomatically, delight. Most English translations render it as pleasure or good pleasure, but I believe that “delight” better reflects the joy that God says He finds in loving relationships with us.

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Here endeth the lesson.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day

Brett Kimberlin is a professed atheist, and other members of Team Kimberlin have expressed hostility to religion, especially Christianity. When they’ve tried to hold people to standards of a religion they don’t understand, they’ve provided grist to be milled in posts like WWJW? from seven years ago today.

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PBT201403231858ZI doubt that He would write something like this—RadioWMS201307261636ZAnd I seriously doubt that He would have posted the picture associated with that tweet.

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What would Jesus write? Perhaps something like this:

You will know them by their fruits. Grapes are not gathered from thorn bushes nor figs from thistles, are they? So every good tree bears good fruit, but the bad tree bears bad fruit. A good tree cannot produce bad fruit, nor can a bad tree produce good fruit.Every tree that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. So then, you will know them by their fruits.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day

This site isn’t the only one on the Interwebz which has poked fun at Team Kimberlin. The TKPOTD for seven years ago reposted this—

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Kimberlin Unmasked [dead link] posted this on Saturday.KU20150110Yes, that’s an interesting connection.

Hmmmmm.

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I miss the cockroach.

Quote of the Day

The Church’s approach to an intelligent carpenter is usually confined to exhorting him not to be drunk and disorderly in his leisure hours, and to come to church on Sundays. What the Church should be telling him is this: that the very first demand that his religion makes upon him is that he should make good tables. Church by all means, and decent forms of amusement, certainly—but what use is all that if in the very center of his life and occupation he is insulting God with bad carpentry? No crooked table legs or ill-fitting drawers ever came out of the carpenter’s shop at Nazareth. Nor, if they did, could anyone believe that they were made by the same hand that made Heaven and earth.

—Dorothy L. Sayers

Quote of the Day

The point of following Jesus isn’t simply so that we can be sure of going to a better place than than this after we die. Our future beyond death is enormously important, but the nature of the Christian hope is such that it plays back into the present life. We’re called, here and now, to be instruments of God’s new creation, the world-put-to-rights which has already been launched by Jesus and of which Jesus’s followers are supposed to be not simply beneficiaries but also agents.

—N. T. Wright

You Keep Using That Word

Marie Solis has a post over at Jezebel (H/T, Memeornadum) titled Republicans Are Trying To Make Abortions Dangerous. Her article decries Gov. Kristi Noem’s executive order restricting prescribing and delivery of abortion pills. Here are a couple of quotes from the post.

As a result, Noem has banned one of the safest, easiest forms of abortion.

Studies have shown that mifepristone and misoprostol are overwhelmingly safe and effective, even when administered outside of a traditional clinic setting.

Safe? One or more (twins) of the people “treated” with these pills winds up dead as a result. Of course, what Ms. Solis and other pro-abortion folks want “safe” to mean is not causing harm to a woman whose pregnancy is being terminated (“pregnancy is being terminated” being a euphemism for “baby is being killed”). This sort of thinking requires viewing children in utero as parasites rather than human beings. But such children are human beings, innocent and deserving of protection.

Safe—I do not think it means what she think it means.

Today’s Text Is From The Book of Second Opinions

UPI has a story up titled New Texas abortion law spurs churches to espouse ‘reproductive freedom’ which reads in part—

Leaders of Just Texas: Faith Voices for Reproductive Justice announced at an Aug. 25 news conference at First Unitarian Church of Dallas that 25 churches have earned the designation of Reproductive Freedom Congregations since 2016 and about 70 more are in the process of getting it.

The program teaches clergy about reproductive healthcare and encourages them to talk about the subject, including abortion, from the pulpit and individually with members of their congregations.

There is no indication that the Reproductive Freedom Congregations will be using Exodus 20:13 as a basis for their teaching.

Quote of the Day

Who stands fast? Only the man whose final standard is not his reason, his principles, his conscience, his freedom, or his virtue, but who is ready to sacrifice all this when he is called to obedient and responsible action in faith and in exclusive allegiance to God — the responsible man, who tries to make his whole life an answer to the question and call of God. Where are these responsible people?

—Dietrich Bonhoeffer

Updating An Earlier Post

On Monday, I put up a post about getting The Right Answer from the Wrong Argument. I received this comment in a email from one of the Gentle Readers named Mary Pat Campbell, and I believe it’s worth sharing:

I am happy that you address what Stacy wrote. I have the same perspective as you, being a run-of-the-mill Catholic. My own degrees are in math & physics, and I loved quantum mechanics… and some asked me how I could reconcile that with being a believing Catholic. My response: who am I to tell God how to order the universe?

We were given reason to figure out how God has ordered creation, not to make aesthetic critiques of those choices.

Separately, I do find it grimly amusing that those who take the (translated) words of Genesis literally usually don’t do the same thing when considering Jesus saying “This is my body”.

Ms. Campbell and I most likely have different understandings of what Jesus meant when He said, “This is my body,” but I bet we both are thankful that God is doing something wonderful for us in ways we can’t completely understand.