Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


As part of a continuing search to find a relevant cause that would motivate donors, Justice Through Music Project got involved with the anti-fracking movement. the TKPOTD from five years ago today dealt with part of that effort.

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Justice Through Music Project has posted another music video on YouTube. It’s a sorta/kinda cover of John Prine’s Paradise. It’s an anti-natural-resource-extraction propaganda piece aimed at the Keystone XL pipeline. In fact, the band calls themselves the Keystone Pipeline Kops instead of Op-Critical.

Now, if I were Brett Kimberlin, I would avoid having anything to do with any song from John Prine’s first album lest I remind listeners of other songs from that album that might have unfortunate references to drug dealing, porn, etc.

Sam Stone: “There’s a hole in daddy’s arm where all the money goes.”

Your Flag Decal Won’t Get You Into Heaven Anymore: “While digesting Reader’s Digest in the back of a dirty book store …”

Illegal Smile: “Won’t you please tell the man I didn’t kill anyone …”

Just sayin’ …

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The failure of The Dread Deadbeat Performer Kimberlin’s music career sounds like a real Dear Abby.

I’m Not Making This Up, You Know


What’s Up With That? reports that Los Angeles is spending $40,000 per mile to paint streets white in order to fight global warming.

Two points—

First, tires are abrasive. How long do they think the paint will last?

Two, most highway-grade paint is petrochemical-based. Did they consider the carbon footprint of the project from manufacturing the paint all the way through to application and maintenance?

Oh, one more thing … there are 6,700 miles of roadways in LA. Doing the whole network would cost something north of a quarter-of-a-billion bucks. What if that money were spent on something like schools or housing for the homeless?

UPDATE—The Daily Mail reports that the product being smeared on LA’s streets is CoolSeal. (H/T, Stephen Green). According to the manufacturer’s website, it is a water-based asphalt sealant designed “for lightly trafficked areas,” so it’s not exactly highway-grade. They may need to find something else to use on roads such as Century Boulevard.

UPDATE 2—Won’t this make the white lines between lanes and defining crosswalks hard to see?