Who Won?


When I first checked this poll, Biden was ahead with about 56 %. I checked it again about an hour after the debate ended and found this.

BTW, abc7 dot com is the website for KABC-TV in Los Angeles. That suggests these poll numbers are mostly driven by California voters.

UPDATE— As I was about to hit the PUBLISH button, I checked the poll again. Trump was up to 56 %, and the percentage of vote switchers was up to 6 %.

Hmmmmm.

I’m So Old …


… I remember when CBS aspired to have a credible news department as part of their operation.

I doubt that either Fred Friendly or Edward R. Murrow would have voted for Donald Trump, but I’m also reasonably certain that neither would have tolerated the sort of shoddy journalism displayed by Leslie Stahl in her recent interview with the President.

Quote of the Day


Early in life I have noticed that no event is ever correctly reported in a newspaper, but in Spain, for the first time, I saw newspaper reports which did not bear any relation to the facts, not even the relationship which is implied in an ordinary lie. … I saw, in fact, history being written not in terms of what happened but of what ought to have happened according to various ‘party lines’.

—George Orwell

Open Mouth, Insert Foot, …


Fox News reports that Brian Stelter may have breached the confidentiality agreement that is part of the settlement of the defamation lawsuit Nicholas Sandmann brought against CNN. Sandmann’ lawyer is quoted as saying, “This retweet by @brianstelter may have cost him his job at @CNN. It is called breach of confidentiality agreement. Brian Stelter is a liar. I know how to deal with liars.” The retweet in question speculated on the amount paid by CNN in the settlement.

Pro tip: “For everything there is a season, and a time for every purpose under heaven: … a time to keep silence, and a time to speak …”

Well, Its Name Is Cable *News* Network


Jon Gabriel has a post over at Ricochet suggesting that CNN might do well to change its format back to news reporting.

If CNN wants to survive our fractured media landscape, they need to take desperate action: abandon their failed politics-only format and return to news and information. …

You know, actual news and information. Families who keep the TV on all day would just leave it on CNN. Those taking a break from the home office would dip in every few hours for the latest. Over time, the network could replace high-priced pontificators with calm newsreaders. The public would be better informed and perhaps further mitigate the pandemic.

Yeah, and with better ratings, ad revenue would increase.

BTW, tonight is the anniversary of the most important news story I was ever involved in reporting. It was in 1968 when I was 20 years old. As the evening newscaster on a clear channel AM station I had a cumulative 2,000,000 listeners that evening—more than almost any CNN program.

Good Advice—From China


My training as a military officer included reading Sun Tzu’s The Art of War. The most famous quote from that ancient Chinese classic is probably

是故勝兵先勝而後求戰,敗兵先戰而後求勝。Victorious warriors win first and then go to war, while defeated warriors go to war first and then seek to win.

Patricia McCarthy has a post over at The American Thinker titled The unbearable pettiness of the Washington press corps which looks at the disrespectful manner in which the press treats Donald Trump at the manner in which the President turns their futile behavior back on them, especially during the Wuhan virus pandemic briefings. Throughout her piece, she quotes Sun Tzu.

What makes these briefings so entertaining is when the president calls them out for their dishonesty.  He has a steel-trap mind and remembers what he has said.  When they twist or edit his words, he knows it and humiliates them.  But they seem not to realize they are being humiliated.

President Trump has been teaching us all.  It is only the men and women of the media who fail to learn.  Donald Trump, as John Perazzo has written, is a superb and unappreciated president.

“Engage people with what they expect; it is what they are able to discern and confirms their projections. It settles them into predictable patterns of response, occupying their minds while you wait for the extraordinary moment — that which they cannot anticipate.” —Sun Tzu

This is that moment.

Read the whole thing. I’ll add this—

上兵伐謀 What is of supreme importance in war is to attack the enemy’s strategy.

The Art of War is available from Amazon.