Choosing Not to Choose


Matthew Stewart has a post over at City Journal titled Multiculturalism, or Cultural Appropriation? in which he make a case that Progressives need to decide between one or the other. It looks at history and the facts and concludes

Another puzzling aspect of the cultural-appropriation focus is that it seems clearly to clash with another progressive imperative: the need to nurture multicultural appreciation. Multiculturalism has been a prominent cause among progressives for more than a generation, but today, admiration for other cultures apparently comes with a warning sign: look, but don’t adopt, lest you face accusations of “theft” or insensitivity.

Most reasonable people have no trouble understanding that to adopt an artifact or practice doesn’t diminish the culture from which it originates. “You can’t steal a culture,” as Columbia University linguist John McWhorter has observed. Cultural exchange is enriching, not impoverishing, and imitation remains, as in the old formulation, the sincerest form of flattery. It’s time for progressives to decide between embracing multiculturalism or policing “cultural appropriation.” They can’t have it both ways.

The Progressive position flies in the face of the logical principle that A is not not-A which our culture inherited from the ancient Greeks. But Progressives never let logic or the facts get in the way of their desire to be in control. O’Brien explained it this way—

‘You are a slow learner, Winston,’ said O’Brien gently.

‘How can I help it?’ he blubbered. ‘How can I help seeing what is in front of my eyes? Two and two are four.’

‘Sometimes, Winston. Sometimes they are five. Sometimes they are three. Sometimes they are all of them at once. You must try harder. It is not easy to become sane.’

And have you noticed that Progressives keep trying to change the meanings of words?

Don’t Know Much About History


As this tweet demonstrates,  should never be considered an authoritative source for Real World information—While it is true that Speaker Pelosi is next in line after the Vice President in the order of succession, Section 2 of the 25th Amendment specifies that the President (i.e., President Pence if Donald Trump were removed from office) “shall nominate a Vice President who shall take office upon confirmation by a majority vote of both Houses of Congress.” Note the use of the word shall. President Pence would be required to nominate a new Vice President subject to the approval of both houses of Congress. When the new VP was sworn in, the Speaker would move back to her proper place in line.

Section 2 has been triggered twice. When Vice President Agnew resigned, President Nixon nominated Gerald Ford to replace him. Congress confirmed that nomination. When President Nixon resigned and Gerald Ford became President, President Ford nominated Nelson Rockefeller as VP, and Congress confirmed him.

Perhaps the kids over at Vox think that Mike Pence couldn’t think of a sufficiently non-controversial nominee for VP and that the office would remain vacant until after the next election. Or maybe they’re too young and too ignorant of History to remember or know what happened 45 years ago.

Or both.

Peanuts and Space Pilots


There’s a post up over at NewsBusters about how Charles Schultz stood firm when he was told by CBS executive that “you can’t read the Bible on television” and insisted on keeping the closing scene in A Charlie Brown Christmas during which Linus quotes from Luke 2.

That one small step for an animated character set the stage for larger steps by three space pilots, Frank Borman, Jim Lovell, and Bill Anders, three years later. During the 40th Anniversary celebration for the Apollo 8 mission in 2008, Frank Borman recalled, “We were told that on Christmas Eve we would have the largest audience that had ever listened to a human voice, and the only instructions that we got from NASA was to do something appropriate.” Jim Lovell added, “The first ten verses of Genesis is the foundation of many of the world’s religions, not just the Christian religion. There are more people in other religions than the Christian religion around the world, and so this would be appropriate to that and so that’s how it came to pass.”

Merry Christmas!

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


One thing for sure about Team Kimberlin is that they’re a bunch of liars—and incompetent liars who wind up easily caught. Indeed, Brett Kimberlin’s first conviction was for perjury about his LSD dealing. It was seven years ago today that this post about A Liar Selling Drugs first ran.

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Continuing with our recent Dread Pirate Kimberlin v. Reality theme, let’s take another look into Chapter 35 of Citizen K by Mark Singer. The Gentle Reader who is familiar with TDPK knows that his first jail term was for perjury during grand jury testimony related to selling LSD.

In 1992, when Kimberlin told me that he trafficked only in marijuana and hashish—besides cocaine just that once—he stated emphatically that he had never sold LSD. “I don’t remember ever selling any hallucinogens. I mean, it’s possible, like, five hits of this or that. But it’s not in my memory base.” He also said, “I’ve never even seen amphetamines.” Yet the same court transcript contained his testimony that he had dealt in small quantities of LSD and methamphetamine. He had bought amphetamines and given them to this girlfriend, he said, because she was trying to lose weight.

Kimberlin exploited the fact that [David] Pacific and [John] Buckley were arrested on drug charges in October 1971, when according to a report in the Indianapolis News, more than $20,000 worth of laboratory equipment was confiscated. But in a 1994 meeting, Pacific told me the “laboratory equipment” was actually vegetable-canning paraphernalia plus a few flasks and petri dishes … the by-product of his and Buckley’s failed experiment to synthesize psilocybin. They had never, he maintained, tried to manufacture LSD. Why go to the trouble when the finished product was so accessible at the cost of about seven cents a hit?

“So you and Buckley weren’t making acid?”

“Oh, no. Good heavens, no,” said Pacific—a quaint-sounding denial that encouraged me to check with the prosecutor, Scott Miller, a former assistant U. S. attorney who’d headed the Bureau of Narcotics “strike-force grand jury,” stated that Pacific and Buckley weren’t manufacturers of LSD but mere jobbers. Though Miller suspected that Kimberlin was one of their suppliers, he opted to pursue a perjury indictment rather than a drug indictment. The government’s general impression was corroborated by Tim Young, who told me that Brett was his source in several “multithousand-hit deals.”

“I probably sold fifty to seventy-five thousand hits of acid in my life, over a year and a half period,” Young said. “Purple microdot and orange sunshine are the two I remember. How much of it from Brett? All of it. I don’t remember buying acid from anyone but Brett. He sold it to me about ten thousand hits at a time. If he said he never sold acid, he’s a lying [redacted]. Guarantee.”

Isn’t it amazing how much of TDPK’s narrative seems to be contradicted by other witnesses, court transcripts, and the like?

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I used to work in Indiana. FWIW, I met both David Pacific and John Buckley on separate occasions before the Speedway Bombings occurred. Based on my personal knowledge of them and what I have also learned from mutual acquaintances, I’d be much more inclined to believe them, especially David Pacific, that The Dread Deadbeat Perjurer Kimberlin.