A Similarity and a Difference


Both the 1972 and 2016 presidential elections were plagued with irregularities committed by persons associated with the party that was in the White House during the election.

However, IIRC none of the criminal acts committed during the 1972 election (as opposed to the 1973/74 coverup) were perpetrated by currently serving law enforcement officials.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Ridicule has been on of the most effective (and quite satisfying) weapons to use on Team Kimberlin. Four years ago, I poked fun at Bill Schmalfeldt with an I’m Not Making This Up, You Know post.

* * * * *

PP201605262016ZPP201605262016Za

The Cabin Boy™ was trying to write something clever about politics and succeeded in showing how little he knows about The Little Corporal. Of course, it was Napoleon who was tagged with that nickname because of his supposedly short stature and a rumor that corporal was his pre-revolutionary rank. Actually, he was of average height and had been commissioned as a Second Lieutenant of Artillery in 1785. Adolph Hitler, OTOH, was referred to as The Bohemian Corporal, originally by the Paul von Hindenburg, the last German president to serve before the Nazi takeover. Hitler had served as corporal in WWI, and “Bohemian” referred to his supposed lifestyle.

#SMH. This just another example of something the Cabin Boy™ knows that isn’t so.

* * * * *

This has been in many ways a battle of wits with unarmed men.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Eight years ago was Everybody Blog About Brett Kimberlin Day. Lots of websites participated, including one that was then known as Breitbart Big Government. I linked to their coverage in a post titled I’m Shocked, Shocked …

* * * * *

Big Government reports that Mr. Kimberlin’s 501c3 funders are “stunned” to be supporting him.

Uh, huh.

I’m reminded of Captain Louis Renault.

* * * * *

Many of the usual suspects no longer associate with Kimberlin. Openly.

Fighting the Last War


There’s an old adage which states that most armies are prepared to fight the last war. It has a deep basis in Reality. After our 1892 medium-power Krag rifles were outclassed by the full-power Mausers used by the Spanish in 1898, we adopted the Mauser-clone 1903 Springfield for World War I. The lessons learned about firepower in that war led to the adoption of the M1, which would have been a superior weapon in WW1, but was outclassed by the German Strumgewehr 44 (the original assault rifle) by the end of WW2. We entered the Viet Nam War armed with the M14, which would have been a great weapon for WW2, only to be outgunned by the other side’s AK47s, true assault rifles. I went through basic training with an M14, but was finally issued an M16 in Viet Nam.

Armies aren’t the only bureaucracies that cling to outdated “solutions.” The public health response to the Wuhan virus pandemic is a case in point.

The 1918 influenza pandemic was worse than it had to be, in part, because of the failure of some communities to take proper measures to prevent rapid spreading. The proper lesson from that pandemic is that dangerous communicable diseases must be contained by reducing interpersonal contact until other means of fighting it are available.

The initial restrictions imposed as public health measures dealing with Covid-19 were reasonable and cautious responses to a potentially catastrophic situation. They would have been excellent in combating the 1918 flu, but it appears that they’ve been overkill in vast swaths of America with disastrous unintended (I hope) consequences. For many the cure is worse than the disease.

Most Real World situations don’t track well with our attempt to model them because we never seem to be able to understand all of the ways that things interact. Experience and common sense and a willingness to take risks are necessary live in the Real World. Credentials are not the same thing as experience, and non-expert expertise has failed. It’s time to get back to living in the Real World. That will require that public health concerns take their rightful place among other factors to balances with economic realities and civil rights.