Requiring a License to Exercise a Constitutional Right

Let’s say that you wanted to petition the legislature in your state and that when you delivered your petition you were told that it would be accepted until you were photographed and fingerprinted, took a training course, passed a background check, and paid a license fee. How would you react?

Let’s say that you wanted to buy a copy of the scriptures of your religious faith and when you went make your purchase the bookseller told you that you could not pick up your book until you were photographed and fingerprinted, took a training course, passed a background check, and paid a license fee. How would you react?

Let’s say that you wanted to register to vote and that when you went to do so you were told that you could not do so until you were photographed and fingerprinted, took a training course, passed a background check, and paid a license fee. How would you react?

Let’s say that you wanted to start a website to publish you ideas and that you went to an Internet service provider to set up an account and were told that you could not have web access until you were photographed and fingerprinted, took a training course, passed a background check, and paid a license fee. How would you react?

Beginning next Tuesday, if you wish to buy a handgun in Maryland you will be told that you cannot do so until you are photographed and fingerprinted, take a training course, pass a background check, and pay a license fee. How should a citizen react to that?

16 thoughts on “Requiring a License to Exercise a Constitutional Right


      • Tennessee is a good choice, and very pretty. I visited Memphis a while ago, and liked the countryside around it; the only thing I didn’t care for was the shocking (to a Californian) humidity.


      • I still cannot fathom why one would stay in the”People’s Republic of Maryland” when one is fully aware of the freedom one may enjoy in the State of one’s birth.


  1. Sounds like Connecticut. And after you’ve taken the course, and paid the first fee, they lose the paperwork. Of course now they’ve decided that you have to do almost as much to get a long gun too. And none of these costly laws would have done a damn thing to prevent Lanza from shooting up that grade school. CT apparently was the only state to have negative GDP last year (or so I heard on the radio this morning). Not surprised. When my youngest finishes high school in a few years, we’ll be looking to relocate someplace south and/or west of here.


  2. My spouse and I are thinking the same thing – relocation. We have drawn up a chart with the top five contenders. Among many other things, such as climate, we look at gun freedom, income taxation, sales tax, property taxes and debt+pension liabilities to GDP. Why all of this? Besides the obvious, states that are in bad financial straights will not have the luxury of printing more money. They will make money the old fashioned way, which is over-taxing and stealing it from their residents.


  3. It’ll be interesting to see if it survives the inevitable constitutional challenge. Hope they budgeted for the legal bills when passing the law. Now that the SC has finally upheld (AFAIK) the 2nd amendment as an individual as well as a collective right, specifically with respect to handguns, it’ll be interesting to see where they place the outer limits on ‘how much regulation does it take for regulation to become restriction?’


  4. The state I reside in has a uniform law for obtaining a concealed carry permit. Every county Sheriff is bound by those laws. Unfortunately in several counties, including my own, the Sheriff has decided to add several steps to the process in contradiction of the law. There is a movement afoot to bring lawsuits against Sheriff’s that will not issue the permits based on the requirements of state law. We’ll see how that turns out.

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