Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


As part of my background research on the Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin, I dug up a bunch of the reviews of his authorized biography Citizen K from when it was published in 1996. Considering that he hasn’t let the one year statute of limitations on defamation stop him from suing me over a non-defamatory blog post written more than a year before he filed suit, TDPK may want to consider adding these media outlets to the new suit he says he’s cooking up.

New York Times—

Mr. Singer began his reporting for the book in the summer of 1993, by going back to Indiana and checking up on what Mr. Kimberlin had told him. What he learned led him, almost immediately, to the conclusion that his subject was a liar of substantial proportions.

Entertainment Weekly—

Having since decided that his subject was, in fact, lying, he’s returned to the tale and fleshed out Kimberlin’s manipulative personality.

Baltimore Sun—

Citizen K lied. Brett lied. Lied about selling pot to Quayle. Lied about everything.

Publishers Weekly—

Quayle, it now seems, deserves apologies.

Los  Angeles Times—

Singer eventually found nearly all his complaints without foundation.

By the end of this complex tale you are left regretting that Singer and the New Yorker overlooked the sound advice of a New Yorker writer of an earlier time, James Thurber. One of his fables, about a feckless horse, ends with a moral all reporters should keep close to their hearts: “Get it right or let it alone. The conclusion you jump to may be your own.”

You see, Gentle Reader, Brett Kimberlin’s reputation as a liar goes a long way back.

Bonus Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The Gentle Reader who has been following the twists and turns of The Saga of The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin’s vexatious lawsuits has surely noticed the substantial disconnect between TPDK’s allegations and reality. This isn’t a new phenomenon. Mark Singer wrote his biography of Brett Kimberlin a couple of decades ago. Singer writes in Citizen K (p. 310):

Once I compared Kimberlin’s renderings of certain incidents with the recollection of other witnesses, the recurring theme of “jumping the connection” almost always emerged. When a dope dealer jumped a connection, he eliminated the middleman, hoping to cut his costs without increasing his risk. Now, both literally and figuratively, it seemed that Kimberlin had this same habit. Figurative instances were narratives in which he claimed center stage, though in reality he’d participated at a distance or not at all. Or, when it suited his purposes, he might do just the opposite, ascribing to others acts he in fact had performed.

Or simply put: Brett Kimberlin tells whatever lie he thinks is to his advantage at any given moment.

Citizen K


CitizenKBack in the ’90s, before Brett Kimberlin’s parole was revoked, Mark Singer extensively investigated Brett Kimberlin’s background and his claim to have sold marijuana to Dan Quayle. Citizen K is the saga of a master drug smuggler, convicted bomber, suspected murderer, jailhouse lawyer, and media manipulator, whose story about supplying marijuana to a future vice president is only the beginning.

Click here to buy the book through Amazon.

UPDATE—Mmmmm. Popcorn.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


In the summer of 1993, while Brett Kimberlin was still locked up on bombing and dope smuggling charges, Mark Singer began probing further into Kimberlin’s story. Because of what Singer had written in the New Yorker about Kimberlin’s claim to have sold marijuana to Dan Quayle, there were few sources in law enforcement who would speak with him, so Singer began looking for folks to talk to in Huntington, Indiana, (Dan Quayle’s hometown) and Bloomington, Indiana, where Kimberlin had claimed to have done business with Quayle. Singer writes in Citizen K (p. 310):

Once I compared Kimberlin’s renderings of certain incidents with the recollection of other witnesses, the recurring theme of “jumping the connection” almost always emerged. When a dope dealer jumped a connection, he eliminated the middleman, hoping to cut his costs without increasing his risk. Now, both literally and figuratively, it seemed that Kimberlin had this same habit. Figurative instances were narratives in which he claimed center stage, though in reality he’d participated at a distance or not at all. Or, when it suited his purposes, he might do just the opposite, ascribing to others acts he in fact had performed.

Or simply put: Brett Kimberlin tells whatever lie he thinks is to his advantage at any given moment.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


Brett Kimberlin got caught lying to a federal grand jury and wound up convicted of perjury. He was asked about his dealing LSD to a two guys named John Buckley and David Pacific. He claimed, based on the fact that the Indiana State Police had busted Buckley and Pacific for attempting to operate a lab to produce psilocybin, that they were making LSD.

During a July, 1972, sentencing hearing for a cocaine bust while he was a juvenile, Kimberlin was asked:

Q. Did you ever sell any LSD to David Pacific or Jenkins, John Jenkins?
A. No, I wouldn’t be selling it to Pacific or John Buckley because they are the ones that had the laboratory, they are the ones that made it all. If I was to do anything I would get it from them. That’s my answer.

He repeated that testimony in October before a grand jury. A second grand jury was convened, and it indicted Kimberlin for perjury. He was convicted.

Through the years, Kimberlin has claimed that Buckley and Pacific lied about him as part of a deal with the feds. When he was working with his biographer Mark Singer, Kimberlin claimed that Cody Shearer, one of the people who had helped him promote his tale about selling marijuana to Dan Quayle, had confronted Buckley and Pacific and that they had acknowledge lying. When Singer checked with Shearer, Shearer said that he had never discussed LSD or perjury with them.

Beginning at the bottom of p. 316 in Citizen K, Mark Singer writes:

Sifting through this heap of mendacity , I asked myself whether Kimberlin lies for sport or whether an assortment of small lies coalesced into a gang of tar babies that encircled him. When I first heard about Pacific and Buckley, they amounted to an interesting brick in my wall; their role in Kimberlin’s life never rose to a sinister level. Ultimately, they signified his willingness to stay wedded to a falsehood despite black-and-white evidence to the contrary. My metaphor metamorphosed. The Pacific-Buckley factoid—the news report of their arrest, along with Kimberlin’s claim of their perjury to frame him for same—was no longer a constructive brick but one of many blond turns in a labyrinth of misinformation.

Or to put it more simply: Brett Kimberlin tells lies, and he seems to do so even when he knows there is documentary evidence proving him a liar.

Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin, Media Critic


Recently, TDPK has increased his notoriety (and infamy) by attempting to use lawfare to silence bloggers who write truthful things about him. Reading Mark Singer’s book Citizen K, it seems that his media relations have had their ups and downs. The attention he received for outlets such as NPR when he claimed to have sold dope to Dan Quayle is one of the high points. The coverage he received from his hometown papers at the time of the Speedway Bomber trials was a definite low. From page 174 …

Three days after the verdict, the Indianapolis Star published a story that described Kimberlin’s encounter with Ben Niehaus in Corpus Christi following his arrest in February 1979. This conversation, according to an investigative report filed by Niehaus, lasted five hours—or, according to Kimbelin, about five minutes. Niehaus noted that Kimberlin “stated that if we wanted to find out who murdered Mrs. Scyphers, we should consider Sandra Barton’s brother-in-law [Jack Crosby] in Austin, Texas, who Kimberlin said was a CIA agent.” The Star reporter, Joe Gelarden, paraphrased Niehaus’ written report: “According to sources, Kimberlin knew the [Crosbys] were helping the police with the Julia Scyphers murder probe. He once tried to get Niehause to investigate the [Crosbys], who took in Sandi Barton’s daughters after their grandmother was murdered. Informants reported Kimberlin left the bag at the [Crosby] residence to frame them for the Speedway bombing.”

The 1979 arrest was the bust for drug smuggling. Ben Niehaus was an investigator in the Speedway Bombing case. The bag in question was a trash bag containing bomb-making materials and an AR-15 rifle. Continuing from Citizen K

The treatment Kimberlin received from the Indianapolis media often provoked his outrage, and he was most offended by the Star. Gelarden, he explained, was a government stooge who would print anything the prosecution fed him. Complaining about this lack of integrity, he referred to “an article written by Gelarden saying that I had told Niehaus that the Scyphers murder weapon was buried in the Crosby’s backyard.”

This was a startling remark. I had read and indexed all the Indianapolis newspaper clippings about the murder and the bombings, but I’d never come across any reference to the murder weapon buried anywhere. A rereading of Gelarden’s clippings confirmed this for me. I had, however, recently heard from a government source that Kimberlin had indeed made the remark to Niehaus about the murder weapon. My bewilderment deepened: If I had never mentioned a buried weapon to Kimberlin, and if no such detail had ever been reported in the newspapers, what had prompted his denial? When a person claims to know where a murder weapon is buried, even if he’s trying to finger someone else, what does that imply?

Gentle Reader, that’s not the only time one of TDPK’s narratives has run aground on the shoals of reality. He tells so many stories that it seems he loses track.

Well, as Mark Twain once wrote, “If you tell the truth, you don’t have to remember what you said.”

Dread Pirate #BrettKimberlin, Pacifist?


On page 173 of Citizen K, Mark Singer describes some of the testimony during one of TDPK’s Speedway Bomber trials. Sandi Barton worked at TDPK’s restaurant and was the mother of a young girl in whom he had taken … how shall I put this? … a special interest. Bixler was a guy who bought guns for TDPK who was, and is, prohibited from possessing firearms because of his felony record.

To counter Kimberlin’s claim that he was temperamentally incapable of violence (“not prone to assaultive behavior”), for instance, the government cited the array of weapons that had been seized during the drug bust in Texas. Among them a .22-caliber semiautomatic pistol equipped with a silencer. The testimony of Bixler placed this gun in Kimberlin’s hands, along with the half-dozen AR-15s he said he had bought for the defendant. To show that Kimberlin was not necessarily an unalloyed altruist who catered to the needs of children and grandmothers, the government confronted Sandi Barton with her grand jury testimony that, on at least two occasions, Brett had slapped [her daughter]. Another time, Sandi had told the grand jury, when [her daughter] refused to speak to Brett he seized her beloved dog, Snoopy.

A guy who isn’t “prone to assaultive behavior” and who slaps little girls—yeah, that’s the bundle of contradiction that seems to be TDPK.