Shameless Commerce


The easiest way to discredit Bill Schmalfeldt is to quote Bill Schmalfelt.

—Stacy McCain

Yep. And the easiest way to quote him wholesale is make his latest book more widely available. Why not let him embarrass himself in his own words?animus_nocendiYou can buy a copy from Amazon by clicking on this link. Of course, the Cabin Boy™ will make a few bucks on each sale, but so will I—and I’ll pass all the earnings through to the Bomber Sues Bloggers fund.

UPDATE—The purpose of promoting this book is not to embarrass the Cabin Boy™. To do that, he would need to have a sense of shame, so embarrassment is clearly off the table. No, the purpose is to discredit him.

One of These Things is Not Like The Others


comparisonTwo of the items shown above are from genuine U. S. District Court documents and are in the public domain. One is from a computer file used to create a document filed with a court, but it is not the court document itself. It is not in the public domain.

Can you tell which is which?

Hint: Look for the Clerk’s acceptance stamps and the PACER legends across the the top of the real court documents.

UPDATE—Here’s the significance of the above lesson. If a copyrighted work is included in a court paper, the court document may be reproduced with the copyrighted material included. However, the copyrighted material is not in the public domain, so it can only reproduced without infringement in the context of the public record. (Aside: The entire first issue of Action Comics was reproduced in a court filing. Guess what kind of lawsuit one would face if one published that material outside of the context of the related court filing without getting the permission of the copyright holder. You don’t tug on Superman’s cape.)

The Cabin Boy™ has included material from Hogewash! in his latest book that does not appear to be from what he filed with the court but from copies of the computer file(s) used create what he filed. If that be the case, he has again infringed multiple copyrights.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


My copy of Animus Nocendi, Bill Schmalfeldt’s latest cut-and-paste opus, arrived Thursday afternoon. I’ve read it. It uses some of his old blog posts and various court papers stitched together with a bit of connective text to attempt to tell his side of “the story.” I can’t really recommend it as an accurate, nothing-but-the-truth, recounting of the interactions between him and me over the past couple of years.

He does share one interesting anecdote. At the very beginning of the book, he relates a conversation he had with Brett Kimberlin in which the subject of Kimberlin’s claim of being Dan Quayle’s dope dealer came up. He quotes Kimberlin as saying, “Of all the things I’ve been charged with, that’s the one thing I DID do!” That summarizes the factually challenged nature of the book. Brett Kimberlin was never charged with selling marijuana (or any other drug) to Dan Quayle, and, if Mark Singer’s research for Citizen K, Kimberlin’s authorized biography, is to be believed, he never sold Dan Quayle any dope either. Similarly, many of the events discussed in the book did not actually transpire as Schmalfeldt describes them.

As I said, I can’t recommend Animus Nocendi. Howerver, if you insist on buying a copy, may I suggest that you use the Amazon shopping link on the Home page? I’ll get a cut of the action, and any earnings from sales of the book will be sent to Bomber Sues Bloggers to help with the expense of defending against The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin’s vexatious lawsuit aimed at suppressing the First Amendment rights of bloggers.

One more thing … animus nocendi is Latin for “intending to harm.” That appears to be an accurate description of the purpose of the book.

In Re Animus Nocendi


Animus Nocendi is the name of the Cabin Boy™ latest cut-and-paste opus. I haven’t read it yet, but Amazon says that I should have a copy tomorrow. I may give it a review in a few days.

Speaking of reviews … The Dreadful Pro-Se Schmalfeldt™ is squawking about “false reviews” and warning that they are violations of law. The law he cites is 15 USC § 1125 which is part of the Lanham Act. It deals with trademark infringement, false labeling of country of origin, and false advertising. It will be interesting to see how far he gets trying to sue anyone over a bad review using that statute.

ACME LEGALI’m sure he is getting the very finest of advice from Acme Legal.

Meanwhile, the Gentle Reader may wish to stock up on popcornJujubesRaisinetsJunior MintsMilk Duds, or Red Twizzlers available via Amazon.

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The most recent member of Team Kimberlin to be stuck with the job of editing Kimberlin’s propaganda website Breitbart Unmasked (No, I won’t link to it.) is Matt Osborne. Since a principal duty of that gig seems to be helping Team Kimberlin dig even deeper holes for themselves in their lawfare, Bunny Boy has been assigned as the Team Kimberlin grave digger and is carried on the roster as 57F Osborne.

While I was reviewing the 50+ posts mentioning me over at Breitbart Unmasked, I found one from 3 September, 2013, that is a wonderful example of Osborne’s cocksure wrongheadedness. He called it We Are Criswell, and it made wildly inaccurate predictions about the lawsuit that The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin had filed against Aaron Walker, Stacy McCain, Ali Akbar, Kimberlin Unmasked, and me in Montgomery County Circuit Court. Back in the ’50s, the real Amazing Criswell was a local TV huckster in LA who sold “Criswell’s Family Vitamins” on infomercials during which he claimed to be a psychic. He was best known for his wildly inaccurate predictions. However, the real Criswell, who occasionally got something right, had a much better record than Osborne—who got everything wrong.

My codefendants and I did not wind up facing “numerous lawsuits in the months to come.” TDPK has tried for a second bite of the apple with his RICO Madness, but that is now looking to be an even bigger disaster for him.

We haven’t had our “asses hauled before a judge and jury to examine their fund raising frauds, tax violations, schemes, and scams.” TDPK hasn’t alleged any tax violations in either suit, and he has been unable to show any of the elements of fraud in either case.

When the case did come to court, we didn’t “lose because they have given Mr. Kimberlin more than enough evidence to prove malice.” TDPK was way short of enough evidence; indeed, the judge told him that he essentially had none.

OTOH, 57F Osborne assuming the Criswell personality for his predictions makes some ironic sense when one considers that The Amazing Criswell is probably best known for his appearance in the worst movie ever made, Plan 9 from Outer Space.