A Busy Signal


Yesterday, I tried to connect to Mossberg’s website. I wanted to look up some information on an old shotgun that’s been in the family since before I was born, an old pre-WWII bolt action .410. I couldn’t get through.

And then I found out that Mossberg has just released several Duck Commander models.

That explains the increased traffic. I guess I’ll wait for the rush to subside. It’s still busy this morning.

Shooting Lessons from a Governor


Texas Governor Rick Perry met with a group of bloggers at a shooting range, and Kathleen McKinley tells about her shooting lesson from him. The pistol used was the same Ruger LCP that Gov. Perry used to dispatch a coyote that attacked while he was walking his dog.

BTW, I concur with his choice of the LCP with a laser sight as a small carry gun.

Rick Perry isn’t the first politician to carry a .380 pistol for personal protection. President Theodore Roosevelt packed a Colt Model 1908. How many other current governors do you think carry for their own protection, and how many completely rely on bodyguards? I know which way I’d bet on Martin O’Malley, the Governor of Maryland.

A Slick Product


Rem OilRem Oil is not really a penetrating oil like good old WD-40, but it is probably a better all-purpose spray can lubricant. It was designed as a gun cleaner/lubricant, and it cleans dirt and grime from exposed metal surfaces while displacing moisture from the pores in the surface of the metal. It also contains Teflon which provides a thin, long-lasting film that keeps things working smoothly by reducing metal-to-metal wear.

Buy it via Amazon.

Why I Don’t Own a Glock


A small child managed to fire a police officer’s holstered Glock 35 pistol, wounding the policeman in the leg. More info here.

Glock pistols are probably the most common type found in police holsters now days. There are two reasons. One is that Glock is very aggressive with their pricing in a time of tight budgets. The other is that, like double action revolvers, Glocks are easy to shoot. The only external safety is on the trigger, so pulling the trigger disengages the safety, firing the pistol.

My objection to the Glock is that it’s too easy to shoot. The standard trigger requires much less force to pull than a double action revolver’s. I prefer a pistol with at least one external safety (not on the trigger) which must be manipulated in order for the weapon to fire. For example, a Model 1911 pistol requires that the thumb safety be set off and the grip safety be fully depressed before the trigger can cause the pistol to fire. The M9 pistol currently issued by the Armed Forces requires that the thumb safety be set off before it can be fired.

It appears that the cop, who is supposed to be a highly-trained SWAT officer, was openly carrying his Glock in a holster that did not cover the trigger. That looks like gross negligence to me. A small child pulled the trigger in this incident. Brushing up against a stiff branch on a bush could have done the same thing.

But remember, it’s only those highly trained government agents who can be trusted with firearms.

UPDATE—The Model 1911A1 pistol.M1911_C_A_D.001

An Afternoon at the Range


RANGE_PHOTOOur cat Bob is an indoor/outdoor cat, and he occasionally brings in fleas. This afternoon, we fogged the house. My son went to work, my wife went to a bridal shower, and I went to the range for some practice. I took Mrs. Hoge’s S&W Model 60 .38 Special, a Browning Buck Mark .22 LR target pistol, and a Kimber Model 1911 .45 ACP.

After limbering up with the .22, I practiced with the Model 60, aiming with the Crimson Trace laser grip. My results were strikingly better with the laser compared to the normal sights, but that’s not surprising given that I’m 65 years old and my eyes aren’t what they used to be.

The target above is the result of 50 rounds through the Kimber at 50 feet. I’ve always done well with a Model 1911, but this is one of the better targets I’ve shot recently.