The Free State?


Some state nicknames make sense. Tennessee is called “The Volunteer State” because of its response to the call for troops during the War of 1812, and the state still provides more than its share of soldiers.

Other state nicknames make no sense these days. Consider Maryland—”The Free State.” Not only is the state among the most heavily over-regulated, it is among the least respectful of the rights on its residents. It is certainly unfriendly to the Bill of Rights. For example, the state’s highest court has ruled that the Second Amendment does not apply in Maryland outside of one’s home.

Jeffrey Goldberg has a piece at The Atlantic about an abuse of a “Free Stater’s” First Amendment rights. A middle school teacher has been ordered to undergo an emergency psych evaluation because he wrote a novel about a school shooting.

Read the whole thing.

Perhaps it’s time for a new nickname. How about “The Democratic Peoples’ Republic”?

Team Kimberlin Post of the Day


The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin feigns fear of Aaron Walker and me. This is from paragraph 76 of his second amended complaint in his Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness.ECF 135-76

 

TDPK strikes me as a bit disingenuous with his worry about people who own firearms. After all, his authorized biography Citizen K tells of how he possessed several AR15s, a silenced pistol, a shotgun, and other weapons back in his drug dealing days. He was barred from possessing any firearm back then because of a previous felony conviction.

RANGE_PHOTOI, OTOH, am a law-abiding gun owner, and, although my 66 year old eyes ain’t what they used to be, I’m still a reasonable shot. The target on the left was shot rapid fire with a .45 at 50 feet.

I’ve never threatened anyone on Team Kimberlin with violence. However, anyone who wishes to threaten me or my family may draw whatever conclusion he will based on what he knows about me.

An “Assault Weapon” in New Jersey?


The New Jersey legislature has passed a bill that would classify any semi-automatic rifle with a fixed magazine that hold more than 10 rounds as an “assault weapon.” That would include such evil firearms as my old .22, a Remington Nylon 66.1959_remington_nylon_66My brother’s little .22 pump action rifle would be covered too if it were a semiauto. But it’s OK because he has to rack the slide between shots.Rossi62<sarc>I’m sure New Jersey will be much safer if Gov. Christie signs the bill.</sarc>

A Very Stupid “Smart Gun”


A German company called Armatix is trying to peddle a very stupidly designed “smart gun.” It’s a small .22 caliber pistol of the sort that might be useful for plinking at tin cans but is underpowered for any serious self-defense application. Strike one.

iP1The gun uses RFID technology to enable operation. The user must have a companion wrist watch, and the watch must be within 10 inches of the pistol in order for it to be fired.

As soon as the gun loses radio contact with the watch – e.g. if it is knocked out of the shooter’s hand or in case of loss, theft, etc. – it automatically deactivates itself.

Since most of us wear our watches on the left wrist, the pistol would have to be fired from the left hand (as shown in the Armatix picture above) or using a two-handed grip. While that wouldn’t be a problem for me, I’m ambidextrous, it’s could be a real issue for the roughly 90% of shooters who are right-handed and might not have both hands free in a self-defense situation. Strike two.

Using RFID means that the gun could be subject to jamming—and I don’t mean failure to feed the next round. Strike three.

I’ll believe that “smart guns” are a good idea when the security details of the politicians who want to force them on the public are carrying them—and no conventional firearms for backup.

Undue Burden Analysis


I’m on record as supporting a ban on high-capacity magazines. No one has any legitimate need for a copy of Mother Jones or Time with more than ten pages. Sebastian has an excellent piece over at Shall Not Be Questioned on how a related, but broader, proposed common sense regulation on reading materials might survive judicial scrutiny.

One might argue there’s no governmental interest, but suppose it’s saving trees? You can have as many e-books as you want, but you’re strictly limited in paper books. The surplus books can be recycled and put back in to supply existing paper needs.

Read the whole thing.