In Four Freedoms Park


Olivia Nuzzzi has a piece over at The Daily Beast about Hillary Clinton’s opening campaign event: Welcome to Hillary Island, a Pleasant Little Police State. This paragraph struck me.

Here would be Hillary Island—formerly Roosevelt Island—a strip of land located in the middle of the East River between Manhattan and Queens that some 10,000 New Yorkers call home. More specifically, here is Four Freedoms Park—a grassy island enclave named for the Four Freedoms FDR spelled out in his 1941 State of the Union speech: Freedom of speech, of worship, from want, and from fear—where the Clinton team has assembled a red and blue stage, in the shape of an H, for her to pace on as she delivers her first major campaign speech.

Read the whole thing. That captures a bit of the Orwellian nature of so much of the Left’s politics these days.

Freedom of speech? The Left now wants to partially repeal the First Amendment in order to correct the Supreme Court’s Citizens United ruling. (I probably I should have included a trigger warning for some Progressives.)

Freedom of worship? Ask the Little Sisters of the Poor about that. Or a former pizza shop owner. For many, worship extends beyond a meeting house and throughout their lives.

Freedom from want? Ask one of the structurally unemployed who can’t find a place in a stagnant economy.

Freedom from fear? Ask that question tonight in one of several Baltimore neighborhoods—if you’re not afraid to go.

BTW, those first two freedoms are about what the government isn’t supposed to be able to take from us. The second pair are gimmes Progressives imagine government can provide. There’s much to be said about the differences between them. The comments are open. Discuss among yourselves.

One Person, One Vote


The Supreme Court has agreed to hear a case from Texas that would seek to allow legislative and congressional districts apportioned based on equal numbers of registered voters instead of equal population. As tempting as that might be to some politicians, it doesn’t seem to comply with the Constitution. Ken Jost explains why.

To be true to the Framers, however, the court perhaps should settle the issue by insisting that states must count all people, not just those eligible to vote under rules subject to political manipulation. “One person, one vote” means just that.

Read the whole thing.

BTW, Ken and I are friends from high school. Our class just celebrated its 50th reunion.