Obamanesia


American Thinker reports that Obama voters seem to be in the first stage of grief—denial. According to polls conducted by USA Today, fewer voters in five of six states with toss up senate races say they voted for the President that actually did.

In 2012, Obama carried three of the states surveyed by USA TODAY and Suffolk University’s Political Research Center with more than 50% of the vote. But now just 47% of likely voters in Iowa, 46% in Colorado and 48% in Michigan say they voted for him.

Of the six states, only in Kansas did the percentage who remember voting for Obama match the actual election returns, at 38%. His standing slid 5 points in North Carolina and 2 in Arkansas.

Hmmm.

Organizational Incompetence


There’s a bit of a buzz about a significant portion of the crowd walking out on a speech by Barack Obama yesterday. While people walking out on the President of the United States is, and should be, news, it may not be the important part of the story.

The event where the President spoke was a campaign rally for Anthony Brown, the Democrats’ candidate for governor of Maryland. Last night, I happened to meet a young person who had been a volunteer campaign worker at the rally. The event had been disorganized, and the level of mismanagement soured that volunteer on politics. The volunteer bitterly expressed a desire not to get involved again.

Given that one of the main campaign issues that Brown faces is his mismanagement of Maryland’s disastrous rollout of its Obamacare website, a disorganized high-profile campaign event reinforces the impression that Brown is a lightweight bumbler.

In a couple of weeks, we will find out if that will be enough to overcome the Democrats’ registration advantage in Baltimore, Prince George’s County, Montgomery County, and their cemeteries.

Tyranny Checked


Bryan Preston reports over at PJ Media that Houston Mayor’s Annise Parker’s subpoenas seeking sermons and other communications by church pastors related to resistance to the Houston “equal rights” ordinance allowing, among other things, men to use women’s restrooms will be “clarified.” In other words, the PR cost of her heavy-handed thuggery is too great.

Actually, asking for sermons should not be a problem. After all, sermons are generally public proclamations. The real problem is that internal church communications are also sought, and that may cross the line defined by pastoral counseling privilege.

When the people in the gay rights movement were essentially focused on their right to be left alone to do things in private, their cause had some traction with folks who didn’t agree with their private behavior. Now that some LGBTQs demand that their public behavior be allowed or even endorsed, there is increasing resistance. The need to resort to bullying such as Mayor Parker’s subpoenas shows the inherent weakness of their cause.

UPDATE—Stacy McCain has some comments here.