Religious Freedom Restoration Act


The Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) is a federal law that was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1993 and signed into law by President Bill Clinton. It was sponsored by then-Congresscritter Chuck Schumer of New York.

Since the federal law was passed, the following states have passed essentially identical laws: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, 
Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, 
Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.

Alabama has enacted a RFRA constitutional amendment.

Additionally, these states have state supreme court decisions that essentially implement the terms of the federal legislation through case law: Alaska, Hawaii, Ohio, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, North Carolina, Washington, and Wisconsin.

So the courts in Massachusetts and Hawaii, the same courts that found gay marriage a constitutional right, have also found in favor of RFRA-like protections for religious people. The suggestion has been made that the whole flap over Indiana’s law is really a bunch of progressives yelling, “Squirrel!” during an unfavorable news cycle.

Could be.

Starbucks


I don’t like Starbucks’s coffee. Like so many west coast coffee purveyors, they use over-roasted beans. I don’t mind some of what I refer to as their “candy drinks” where the bad coffee is buffered by other flavors. Still, for the price of a few visits to Starbucks, I can buy a week’s supply of properly roasted Kona or Blue Mountain coffee and brew it properly at home.

Since I don’t frequent their stores, I haven’t been accosted by one of their baristas with a gratuitous discussion of race from a kid whose parents probably weren’t alive when I was covering the civil rights movement as a broadcaster in the South in the ’60s.

For that I’m thankful.

Running Against the Press


Andrew Klavan has a piece up at PJ Media suggesting that the Republican who can win the next presidential election is the one who realizes that he is running against the press. He uses his answers to four “gotcha” questions as examples of how to respond to a press corps that is a bunch of Democrat operatives with bylines.

Do you believe in evolution? Is Barack Obama a Christian? Does Barack Obama love America? And soon to come: Do you believe in abortion in cases of rape and incest?

His answers to the questions about Barack Obama hit the bullseye. However, I believe that his answer on evolution could be punched up a bit and that his answer on abortion, while defensible, needs work.

Do you believe in evolution? Of course, and I’m concerned about harmful mutations such as [fill in the blank with the liberal cause du jour].

Do you believe in abortion in cases of rape and incest? Neither rape nor incest is a capital crime any more, so we should not allow the death penalty for one of the victims.

Read the whole thing.