Another Brick in the Wall


Celina Durgan reports at NRO that the Secular Coalition of America is asking folks to knit bricks to show their outrage over the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby decision. The knitwits at the SCA want to send hundreds yarn bricks to the Court to express concern for the “wall of separation” between church and state being breached.

Uh, huh.

If the knitwits had ever read Thomas Jefferson’s letter to the Danbury Baptists (the source of the phrase), they would know that he intended it to mean that the government should keep its nose out of the business of religion and not the other way around. I doubt that Jefferson would approve of a law or regulation that mandates that one must violate his conscience.

 

When the Hunters Become the Hunted


M. D. Kittle reports that the Wisconsin prosecutors who have been running the politically inspired John Doe investigations against various conservative organizations are not having a good time.

Some say the prosecutors, not used to being on the defensive, are sounding a little nervous these days, maybe even hostile. Their filings in federal court of late come across as condescending, and testy.

Read the whole thing.

Holder’s Batting Average


While I was researching cases to cite as authorities in a motion to dismiss that I’ve been writing this weekend, I found a useful case that lists Eric Holder as one of the parties. It turns out be a case where he came out ahead.

The Attorney General has taken a real drubbing in the Supreme Court. In a piece in the NY Post John Fund and Hans A. von Spakovsky point out that if Holder were a baseball player, he’d have been benched or cut from the team a long time ago. Holder not only loses cases in the Supreme Court, but he’s lost many 9-0.

Holder and Obama have argued that we as Americans don’t have the right to free speech, the right to privacy, the right to due process or the freedom of religion.

Thankfully, the Supreme Court has become the last defense for those who still believe in those rights.

Read the whole thing.

Speaking of 501(c)(3)


The Gentle Readers who have been following the progress of the Kimberlin v. The Universe, et al. RICO Madness will remember that a big chunk of The Dread Pro-Se Kimberlin’s allegations rest on his claim that the National Bloggers Club never applied for recognition of its 501(c)(3) status by the IRS. Given the fact of NBC now being listed by the IRS as a 501(c)(3) entity, one can safely assume that such an application was made.

Indeed, it was. In 2012.

The Gentle Reader may also recall that back in 2012/2013 some organizations experienced unusual delays with the processing of their 501(c)(3) paperwork. NBC’s took almost two years to get through.

So as I spend a bit of this holiday weekend working on court papers for the RICO Madness, I’m pleased to learn that there are some IRS lawyers who may also be spending time prepping for court cases related to 501(c)(3). Stephen F. Hayes reports:

On July 10, IRS lawyers will appear in federal district court to explain why they never reported the emails missing in the context of a lawsuit brought by Judicial Watch. And the following day, the IRS legal team is expected to try to block outside access to the evidence that Lois Lerner’s computer crashed—if such evidence exists.

Heh.

It’s not the crime that gets you … it’s the cover up.

—Richard Nixon

UPDATE—Nixon only lost 18 minutes worth of data.

 

Quote of the Day


We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.—That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, —That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness.

—Declaration of Independence

Hubris and Nemesis


As time goes by, there will be more fallout from the Administration’s decision to issue a regulation requiring coverage for contraception under Obamacare. (And that was done by regulation. It’s not part of the Affordable Care Act.) That overreach in violation of the Religious Freedom Restoration Act was famously smacked down by the Supreme Court this week.

It looks like the next big religious freedom brouhaha will be over LGBT employment “rights” created by executive fiat. The Atlantic reports:

Last week, the administration announced it would issue an executive order banning federal contractors from discriminating on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity, a reform long sought by gay-rights groups. Such an order would essentially impose on contractors the provisions of the proposed Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which passed the Senate but hasn’t been taken up by the House.

But the text of the order has not yet been released, so it is not known whether it will include a religious exemption.

Not many people practice the idolatrous religion of the ancient Greeks, but after multiple losses in the Supreme Court, it’s almost as if Nemesis is spending a lot of time at the White House.

And In Other Court News


The Supreme Court delivered its 12th and 13th unanimous rebukes of former Constitutional Law professor Barack Obama’s administration.

One decision explains the meaning of the recess appointment clause of Article II, Section 2 to Prof. Obama.

The other explained that the First Amendments protections of free speech and free assembly trump laws such as the Massachusetts statute which banned peaceful protests around abortion clinics. The Administration agued in support of the law.

#TheCountry’sInTheBestOfHands

Disaster Du Jour


Bret Stephens discusses the fruits of Obama’s foreign policy over at WSJ.

Yet when it comes to leadership, we have our very own Clement Attlee at the top, eager to subtract the burdens of international responsibility so he can get on with the only thing that really animates him, which is building social democracy at home. Actually, that’s unfair to Attlee, who could count on a powerful ally to pick up England’s dropped reins, rescue Europe, stop the Soviets. Mr. Obama’s method is to ignore a crisis for as long as possible, give a speech, impose a sanction, and switch the subject to climate change or income inequality.

Read the whole thing.

I’m Not Making This Up, You Know


WaPo reports that the White House has blown the cover of the CIA top officer in Afghanistan.

The CIA’s top officer in Kabul was exposed Saturday by the White House when his name was inadvertently included on a list provided to news organizations of senior U.S. officials participating in President Obama’s surprise visit with U.S. troops.

The White House recognized the mistake and quickly issued a revised list that did not include the individual, who had been identified on the initial release as the “Chief of Station” in Kabul, a designation used by the CIA for its highest-ranking spy in a country.

Just wait until this bunch is in charge of your healthcare.

Oh …

Plus Ça Change …


It turns out that the data used to support the conclusions in French economist Thomas Piketty’s book Capital in the Twenty-First Century has been fudged. This undermines the credibility of yet another bit of “research” that bolstered a progressive political meme, increasing economic inequality.

I’m reminded of Michael Bellesiles’s Arming America.

plus c’est la même chose.

VA Healthcare


John Fund takes a look at government run healthcare as typified by the VA and other single-payer systems.

The veterans’ hospital scandals now in the news in the United States show just how bad things can get when the pressure of patient demand and waiting lists affects bureaucratic behavior.

The efficiency of the Post Office and the bedside manner of the IRS maybe a best-case scenario for Obamacare.

Read the whole thing.

Undue Burden Analysis


I’m on record as supporting a ban on high-capacity magazines. No one has any legitimate need for a copy of Mother Jones or Time with more than ten pages. Sebastian has an excellent piece over at Shall Not Be Questioned on how a related, but broader, proposed common sense regulation on reading materials might survive judicial scrutiny.

One might argue there’s no governmental interest, but suppose it’s saving trees? You can have as many e-books as you want, but you’re strictly limited in paper books. The surplus books can be recycled and put back in to supply existing paper needs.

Read the whole thing.