Nuclear or Asymmetrical?


Jonathan V. Last has a piece over at The Weekly Standard called The Culture War Goes Nuclear. He notes that campaigns such as #GamerGate and Sad Puppies and the reaction to Honey Maid’s my-two-dads commercial signal a change in the Culture War.

Pile Honey Maid on top of #GamerGate, and Anthony Stokes, and Brendan Eich, and the UVA rape epidemic-not to mention Indiana and the Little Sisters of the Poor-and eventually you understand that the culture war isn’t just about abortion anymore. Or even gay marriage. It’s about everybody and everything.

Read the whole thing.

I disagree with his characterization of the conflict as going nuclear. From this old soldier’s point of view it looks more like the sort of asymmetrical warfare the Left used to glorify as a “war of national liberation.”

Religious Freedom Restoration Act


The Religious Freedom Restoration Act (RFRA) is a federal law that was passed by the U.S. Congress in 1993 and signed into law by President Bill Clinton. It was sponsored by then-Congresscritter Chuck Schumer of New York.

Since the federal law was passed, the following states have passed essentially identical laws: Arizona, Arkansas, Connecticut, Florida, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, 
Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, 
Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia.

Alabama has enacted a RFRA constitutional amendment.

Additionally, these states have state supreme court decisions that essentially implement the terms of the federal legislation through case law: Alaska, Hawaii, Ohio, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, North Carolina, Washington, and Wisconsin.

So the courts in Massachusetts and Hawaii, the same courts that found gay marriage a constitutional right, have also found in favor of RFRA-like protections for religious people. The suggestion has been made that the whole flap over Indiana’s law is really a bunch of progressives yelling, “Squirrel!” during an unfavorable news cycle.

Could be.

On Decorum


I’ve been informed that Bill Schmalfeldt has made a claim that I have stated that avatars depicting relatives of members of Team Kimberlin are not permitted here at Hogewash!. I have no recollection of such a rule, and a search of the entire blog history using multiple keywords confirms my memory. Thus far, I have not exercised any editorial control over the avatars used by commenters. I find some avatars very inappropriate, but I have limited my censorship to the words or images contained within comments.

The Cabin Boy™ is threatening to allow publication of inappropriate avatars using Mrs. Hoge’s likeness. Since I’m not sure that the Gentle Readers grasp the level of filth that might be involved, I’ve decided to post this link to a sample of some of the milder images of my family members that I’ve received from Team Kimberlin over the past month. Even if the Cabin Boy™ limits himself to those sorts of images, he’ll still be digging himself a deeper hole.

I’ve been advised by several friends to ban commenters with inappropriate avatars. I’m not inclined to do so. I hope that I don’t have to change my mind.

UPDATE—I’ve been sent a link to a comment that has been posted on the Cabin Boy’s™ latest blog. The comment consists of a link to an image of the sort I don’t let through moderation or trash as soon as I find it.

It’s no surprise that Schmalfeldt is letting more of his depraved ugliness show.

UPDATE 2—I’m informed that the comment discussed above has been deleted. That was a wise choice.