A Liar Selling Drugs


Continuing with our recent Dread Pirate Kimberlin v. Reality theme, let’s take another look into Chapter 35 of Citizen K by Mark Singer. The Gentle Reader who is familiar with TDPK knows that his first jail term was for perjury during grand jury testimony related to selling LSD.

In 1992, when Kimberlin told me that he trafficked only in marijuana and hashish—besides cocaine just that once—he stated emphatically that he had never sold LSD. “I don’t remember ever selling any hallucinogens. I mean, it’s possible, like, five hits of this or that. But it’s not in my memory base.” He also said, “I’ve never even seen amphetamines.” Yet the same court transcript contained his testimony that he had dealt in small quantities of LSD and methamphetamine. He had bought amphetamines and given them to this girlfriend, he said, because she was trying to lose weight.

Kimberlin exploited the fact that [David] Pacific and [John] Buckley were arrested on drug charges in October 1971, when according to a report in the Indianapolis News, more than $20,000 worth of laboratory equipment was confiscated. But in a 1994 meeting, Pacific told me the “laboratory equipment” was actually vegetable-canning paraphernalia plus a few flasks and petri dishes … the by-product of his and Buckley’s failed experiment to synthesize psilocybin. They had never, he maintained, tried to manufacture LSD. Why go to the trouble when the finished product was so accessible at the cost of about seven cents a hit?

“So you and Buckley weren’t making acid?”

“Oh, no. Good heavens, no,” said Pacific—a quaint-sounding denial that encouraged me to check with the prosecutor, Scott Miller, a former assistant U. S. attorney who’d headed the Bureau of Narcotics “strike-force grand jury,” stated that Pacific and Buckley weren’t manufacturers of LSD but mere jobbers. Though Miller suspected that Kimberlin was one of their suppliers, he opted to pursue a perjury indictment rather than a drug indictment. The government’s general impression was corroborated by Tim Young, who told me that Brett was his source in several “multithousand-hit deals.”

“I probably sold fifty to seventy-five thousand hits of acid in my life, over a year and a half period,” Young said. “Purple microdot and orange sunshine are the two I remember. How much of it from Brett? All of it. I don’t remember buying acid from anyone but Brett. He sold it to me about ten thousand hits at a time. If he said he never sold acid, he’s a lying [redacted]. Guarantee.”

Isn’t it amazing how much of TDPK’s narrative seems to be contradicted by other witnesses, court transcripts, and the like?

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